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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After tons of researching and found a couple great sites for an axillary Circuit Motorcycle Sealed Fuse box Kit, I decided to go with a state-site vendor 'Cycle Terminal'.

Couldn't be happier; first Joe explained to me what a 'Can Bus' is and does, and if I need to have a diode in the relay to depress the switching off power spikes. So now my 9er is safe from power spikes -thanks buddy :)
I received his really awesome premium handmade kit (sharp looks, neat and super pro) after only 4 days, yes.. he got the order Monday Feb 24 and I got it today Friday the 28th for only $5.99 shipping. Darn you Joe.. you are to good for us :cool:

Here is what I received (soooo happy)
CycleTerminalFuseKit.jpg

So now my Oxford heated gripz, usb and aux are nicely professional cleanly connected.. thanks again Joe Mr. Cycle Terminator aka Terminal :evil6:
 

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Fuzeblocks, as I understand, needs a lot of snipping of accessory wires and not using their in-built fuses. I like to keep accessory wires as they are, just in case I need to return them or something like that.
Th cycle terminal seems like the Eastern Beaver system- but I was wondering how does one add the power terminals to these? Do we have to make new connectors?
 

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Fuzeblock. SAE cables are a dime a dozen, with or without the inline fuze. I plug most stuff into SAE cables with the exception of my Tapp Lite USB port which the guys at 3BR will make any way you like.
 

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I am not sure what you mean. Do you mean accessories that have the SAE cables? Or do we convert the cables to SAE?
You will have to dumb it down a bit for me to understand.

So far I have fixed heated grips, heated gloves harness, USB/Cig lighter charger unit and a gorilla alarm- all have the positive and negative wires that need to be hooked up to the battery. I have been using a Powerlet Termin 8- almost like a extension cord for the battery with it's own fuse- for these connections. Do I convert all these connectors into SAE? Ideally,some sort of a relay switch on this terminal would be great- I like that this takes such little space and thats why I though the sealed box fuse cycle terminal would work well without taking too much space.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Fuzeblocks, as I understand, needs a lot of snipping of accessory wires and not using their in-built fuses. I like to keep accessory wires as they are, just in case I need to return them or something like that.
The cycle terminal seems like the Eastern Beaver system- but I was wondering how does one add the power terminals to these? Do we have to make new connectors?
You are correct that the harnesses are like Eastern Beaver system, however I found that;
- I'm supporting state-site (Cycle Terminal is in NJ)
- Shipping was only $5.99 vs +$20 and I had it in 4 days (a custom made fuse block woww)
- and the most important part for me... Joe from Cycle Terminal responded to my emails right away, the others didn't.

Ok ok.. with all Fuse harnesses - blocks you have to cut-snip to connect to it, in my case for the oxford heaters I had to snip above the red in-line fuse.
BTW, either cut or not if accessories have been installed you cannot return them. A different story is with warranty, if defective I was able to return the accessories within the time period.
 

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SAE cables are what many battery charger and now a bunch of other stuff use. The inline fuse on many cables is the easy way to determine the Positive wire. I use a pair of wire terminal pliers, snip it off, strip the wire (same pliers), put a band of red electrical tape around the positive wire for reference, and I am done. If you are freaked out about loosing the inline fuse, they sell them at all parts stores. This works for every single wiring application that I can think of. The fuzeblock allows me to have anything switched (key on) or unswitched just by moving the fuse inside the block. This whole system allows me to have only one set of ring terminals connected to my bike battery.
 

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motorock, i'd advise brushing up on the fundamentals of electrical circuits. the circuits on the bike are low voltage so for the most part there's not much chance of hurting yourself seriously, but connecting things wrong can do damage to the bike and even start fires if you're really unlucky.

here are some links to get you started:

Volume I - DC : All About Circuits
Electrical basics, DC Circuits.
Direct Current (DC) Electrical Circuits by Ron Kurtus - Succeed in Understanding Physics: School for Champions
 

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Thank you everyone for your inputs. I have asked Powerlet about possibility of a relay with their system- if nothing else works, will get the Cycle Terminals. The Fuzeblock looks good but it looks like it will take a lot of space- going by pictures that others have posted. I need the underseat area to keep my disc lock and some other things. The area under the tank next to the battery, is taken by the Gorilla alarm and other wiring. That leaves me with barely any space!

Bobby walnuts, that's a really long read. I don't think I will be doing very complicated installs but if I do, I will surely refer to that. Or just hand it over to a professional! But beyond what I have, I don't think I am tapping into the battery any more. But never say never!
 

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I went and ordered myself a set from Cycle Terminal as well even when Im in Australia...Joe was really helpful and quick on the email.

I went the posilock option - posilocks/taps are near impossible to get here in Australia and they are one of the easiest methods of tapping/linking cables so it seems like a great option.

Also took the opportunity to order a bunch of other posi-options.

Looking forward to hooking this up to my oxford grips and USB charger!
 

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After tons of researching and found a couple great sites for an axillary Circuit Motorcycle Sealed Fuse box Kit, I decided to go with a state-site vendor 'Cycle Terminal'.

Couldn't be happier; first Joe explained to me what a 'Can Bus' is and does, and if I need to have a diode in the relay to depress the switching off power spikes. So now my 9er is safe from power spikes -thanks buddy :)
I received his really awesome premium handmade kit (sharp looks, neat and super pro) after only 4 days, yes.. he got the order Monday Feb 24 and I got it today Friday the 28th for only $5.99 shipping. Darn you Joe.. you are to good for us :cool:

Here is what I received (soooo happy)
View attachment 2980

So now my Oxford heated gripz, usb and aux are nicely professional cleanly connected.. thanks again Joe Mr. Cycle Terminator aka Terminal :evil6:
Proud is definitely not the right word for describing the feeling I've got when I'm the dumbest in the thread : )

I have purchased an auxiliary HID Xenon from Touatech and a powerful horn from Wolo (each upgraded with original wiring kit added to the purchase) and just learned everything I can by going through the 'Electricity 101' lessons online. Now that I ended up with the following question:
As long as I use each particular product's original relay & in-line fuse kit, I think I can make them work (i.e. in an electrically-safe manner) by directly wiring each of the two relays into the battery, separately. However, I am not sure (i) if I still need a distribution box and (ii) if I need more fuses in the picture. If I get the expected answers to these two questions as "yes" and "no", respectively, then I think I can go for two unfused distribution blocks (i.e. one for power and another for ground). If the answers are "yes" and "yes", then I suppose each fuse in the distribution unit will be identical to the in-line fuse came with the relevant original accessory kit.

Should you feel like I've started getting things right about motorcycle electricity (partially or fully), please help me further understand what to do with my pending installations.

I will appreciate, if you could explain the followings, briefly of course:
- why I might need distribution box?
- does a "fuse block" mean a fused distribution block?
- are Fuzeblocks.com's products sophisticated examples of fused distribution blocks with added switches, relays, etc. (I will read Fuzeblocks.com's FAQ section though)?
- could there be a problem if I just pick the best cable & blocks on the market with the highest AWG/SWG measures - would going for the excessively high xWG numbers help me avoid problems?
- and why exactly a battery terminal is needed when I have fuse/distribution block(s)?
 

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Not 100% sure I understand your question but here are some rules about fuses and relays:

1) You need a fuse on the 12+ supply wire of every circuit to prevent excess current draw if some failure in that circuit causes excess current draw such as a wire rubbing bare and shorting to ground (the frame of the bike). The fuses are mounted in a fuse block.

2) You need a relay between the battery and the 12+ supply terminal to the fuse block so that the power to the fuseblock can be switched on and off with the ignition key.

The relay has 2 sides: the armature which causes the relay to change from on and off and the switched terminals that actually connect the power between the battery 12+ terminal and the fuse block.

The armature or windings of the relay need very little power and can be connected to ground on the frame anywhere on the ground armature terminal and the other armature terminal is connected to a switched 12+ source like the taillight. Thus whenever the taillight is on, the relay is switched on and connecting the battery 12+ terminal to the fuse block.

The switched terminals must have a current rating at least as great as the projected current draw on your fuse block. For example, if you have a maximum current draw of 15 amps in the circuits connected to your fuseblock, then the switched terminals must be rated for supplying 15 amps or more. A relay with switched terminals rated at 30 amps is $5 at any autoparts store. Such relays are often referred to as fog lamp or accessory relays.

In operation, a small current draw from the taillight circuit causes the relay to switch on. When the relay is switched on, it is capable of delivering a relatively large current from the battery to the fuse block. Using the 30 amp accessory relay discussed above, the relay can deliver 30 amps from the battery to the fuse block.

The fuse block distributes the incoming current to each of the different circuits.
 
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Proud is definitely not the right word for describing the feeling I've got when I'm the dumbest in the thread : )

I have purchased an auxiliary HID Xenon from Touatech and a powerful horn from Wolo (each upgraded with original wiring kit added to the purchase) and just learned everything I can by going through the 'Electricity 101' lessons online. Now that I ended up with the following question:
As long as I use each particular product's original relay & in-line fuse kit, I think I can make them work (i.e. in an electrically-safe manner) by directly wiring each of the two relays into the battery, separately. However, I am not sure (i) if I still need a distribution box and (ii) if I need more fuses in the picture. If I get the expected answers to these two questions as "yes" and "no", respectively, then I think I can go for two unfused distribution blocks (i.e. one for power and another for ground). If the answers are "yes" and "yes", then I suppose each fuse in the distribution unit will be identical to the in-line fuse came with the relevant original accessory kit.
no, you don't need a distribution box to wire those particular accessories directly to the battery, and no you don't need additional fuses if the accessories already have inline fuses.


- why I might need distribution box?
it cleans things up a bit and keeps the wiring simpler, especially if you're wiring up a lot of accessories.


- could there be a problem if I just pick the best cable & blocks on the market with the highest AWG/SWG measures - would going for the excessively high xWG numbers help me avoid problems?
no, going overkill on the wire gauge won't really help things. if say your electrical accessory only needs 1-2 amps, 10 awg is massive overkill. thicker wiring is harder to work with/more difficult to route.
 

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no, you don't need a distribution box to wire those particular accessories directly to the battery, and no you don't need additional fuses if the accessories already have inline fuses.




it cleans things up a bit and keeps the wiring simpler, especially if you're wiring up a lot of accessories.




no, going overkill on the wire gauge won't really help things. if say your electrical accessory only needs 1-2 amps, 10 awg is massive overkill. thicker wiring is harder to work with/more difficult to route.
Thanks for detailed information!! ?
 

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Good questions:

I've got a 'Centech AP-2' Aux Fuse Panel sitting around in my 'misc motorcyle parts box'; and am thinking about adapting it to the Zed-9r.

Currently, I have two additional connections coming off the battery: one for the battery charger and the other for a cable to the tankbag (A third seems like too many wires culminating off the battery posts (looks clumsy & the battery post screws are to damn short to accommodate)).

I'm adding a Valintine-1 lead, Sena bluetooth charger, and i-Phone charger (all of which pull minimal amps).

I'm thinking the 15 amp lead to the tankbag should be fine as long as you step-down in amperage with the inline cables povided by each of the individual manufacturers.

!Wait a minute!, thats not gunna work. It will make a mess of my tankbag ...

- just had an epiphany: step-down the inline fuse to the tankbag from 15 amps to 3 amps!

Problem solved, me thinks- thanks for the ear, FZ09.org!

Loving the information sharing here
 

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After tons of researching and found a couple great sites for an axillary Circuit Motorcycle Sealed Fuse box Kit, I decided to go with a state-site vendor 'Cycle Terminal'.

Couldn't be happier; first Joe explained to me what a 'Can Bus' is and does, and if I need to have a diode in the relay to depress the switching off power spikes. So now my 9er is safe from power spikes -thanks buddy :)
I received his really awesome premium handmade kit (sharp looks, neat and super pro) after only 4 days, yes.. he got the order Monday Feb 24 and I got it today Friday the 28th for only $5.99 shipping. Darn you Joe.. you are to good for us :cool:

Here is what I received (soooo happy)
View attachment 2980

So now my Oxford heated gripz, usb and aux are nicely professional cleanly connected.. thanks again Joe Mr. Cycle Terminator aka Terminal :evil6:
Cool. I have a Fuzeblock and couldn't be happier.
@DevilsThorn - are you sure CanBus matters for FZs? What did Joe say about it? I was just about to put an order for the sealed, unswitched and no-CanBus version of your 3-circuit setup; now I'm a bit confused.

And @DNFDOUG - what do you think?

I think both Eastern Beaver's Power Center 8 and Fuzeblocks' FZ-1 are cool stuff. But I will go for Eastern Beaver's ready-to-go sealed 3-circuit solution as it's easier to install and I don't think I will ever need to install more than four auxiliaries (i.e. three circuits thanks to Eastern Beaver and one fused-MT090 connector in the fake air scoop.)

I liked E.B.'s ready-to-go approach (i.e. which required almost zero initiative from me) as I hate (even thinking about) risking a destructive fire in my bike, for example, due to a soldering/taping mistake I could make for a phone charger!
 

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...
The fuse block distributes the incoming current to each of the different circuits.
...
no, going overkill on the wire gauge won't really help things. if say your electrical accessory only needs 1-2 amps, 10 awg is massive overkill. thicker wiring is harder to work with/more difficult to route.
Good questions:
...
!Wait a minute!, thats not gunna work. It will make a mess of my tankbag ...

- just had an epiphany: step-down the inline fuse to the tankbag from 15 amps to 3 amps!
Thank you guys for valuable input that helped so much in making up my mind.

So, I've got the original & sealed wiring harnesses ready for two pending installations: The horn (Wolo Bad Boy Model 419) and the external high-beam driving light (Touratech Auxiliary HID). I bought the original sealed harnesses for each of them because I never believed that my DIYs could be any better. So we can assume that the wiring is reliable & ready-to-go at the parts' ends.

On the battery's end (i.e. from the battery to the harnesses) I didn't like the idea of forcing connecting (1) the horn's harness, (2) the auxiliary light's harness and (3) the Battery Tender's pigtail's ring terminals into the battery’s relatively-small positive and negative heads. So I decided to go for Eastern Beaver's 3CS three-circuit solution (the sealed heavy-duty version), which I believe would be as reliable as the original harnesses. So, when 3CS meets the original harnesses, things will not only be reliable but also good-looking, from the battery end to the parts’ ends. But I still have some final doubts just before I actually start working on the bike:

Q.1. Each of the two original harnesses at the parts' ends has its own fuse (in accordance with the products max amperage, in-line) and its own relay (reliable relay units to connect to the horn switch and high-beam switch). So, could there be any benefit of ordering the switched version of the 3CS at the battery's end? If so, the parts will be double-switched.

Q.2. If there could be any benefit for ordering the switched version of 3CS, I will have to order one of the circuits unswitched anyways - so that I can always keep the battery charged with Battery Tender when bike is not in use. And in order to trigger 3CS’s switch for the remaining two switched circuits, I plan to use the factory-switched & fused MT090 female connector in the fake air scoop. Would that be too much for a simple power source switch? Do you think that I Should use a simpler cable, such as license plate running light, as switched power source - or should I even forget about a switched battery-end, as referred to in Q.1.? If I use a simpler switched power source, then the factory-switched & fused connector in the fake air scoop will stay as a joker for next mod (e.g. a power commander).

Q.3. What is your suggestion for calculating the amperage of the fuses? Wouldn’t make sense simply putting each individual circuit of 3CS a fuse in the same amperage, i.e. equal to the in-line fuse of relevant part’s original harnesses (i.e. same amperage for the in-line fuse in the horn’s original harness and for the fuse of the corresponding circuit in 3CS, same amperage for the in-line fuse in the auxiliary driving light’s original harness and for the fuse of the corresponding circuit in 3CS, and same amperage for the in-line fuse in the Battery Tender’s pigtail and for the fuse of corresponding circuit in 3CS)? Could there be any other calculation for added security??

Q.4. I think FZs are not CanBUS bikes but I keep seeing references in the forum and I'm confused about including a CanBUS protective diode option in ignition switched lead (i.e. for preventing a possible reverse EMF flow back to the bike, as sellers say). Other than an additional monetary cost of five Dollars, is there any downside of still having them in-line for each switched power source?

Q.5. Final one: I plan using Posi-Lock branded products especially for connecting the 3CS’s circuits to the harnesses and for connecting the switched power sources of the relays. I searched for Posi-Lock’s patents over patents.google.com and they seemed quite reliable; but do you think these plastic parts will perform as good as Sumitomo’s SL sealed connectors? Note: If I don’t opt for Posi-Lock, I plan to use the sealed connectors without soldering (because I don’t have any experience & hardware) – needless to say, unsoldered tabs may not perform as good as soldered ones. See a comparison of unsoldered & soldered tabs as follows:
mp630-3_1752.jpg
 

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On the battery's end (i.e. from the battery to the harnesses) I didn't like the idea of forcing connecting (1) the horn's harness, (2) the auxiliary light's harness and (3) the Battery Tender's pigtail's ring terminals into the battery’s relatively-small positive and negative heads. So I decided to go for Eastern Beaver's 3CS three-circuit solution (the sealed heavy-duty version), which I believe would be as reliable as the original harnesses. So, when 3CS meets the original harnesses, things will not only be reliable but also good-looking, from the battery end to the parts’ ends.
adding the fuse block won't make it more reliable vs. simply connecting the harnesses for your light, horn, and battery tender directly to the battery. in fact, you're increasing complexity (for no useful reason, as your accessory harnesses already have relays and fuses) and adding points of potential failure, which makes it less reliable.

the fuse block makes more sense if you've got accessories that don't already have switches and/or fuses.

for your specific application, personally i'd wire the harnesses directly to the battery. you might need to get longer battery bolts, but that's about it. only real disadvantage is that you've got a bunch of wires coming from the battery terminals which makes it more tedious if the battery needs to come out, but how often will you be doing that?

that said, if your mind is set on buying the fuse block:


Q.1. Each of the two original harnesses at the parts' ends has its own fuse (in accordance with the products max amperage, in-line) and its own relay (reliable relay units to connect to the horn switch and high-beam switch). So, could there be any benefit of ordering the switched version of the 3CS at the battery's end? If so, the parts will be double-switched.
no benefit of getting the switched version for your current application.


Q.3. What is your suggestion for calculating the amperage of the fuses? Wouldn’t make sense simply putting each individual circuit of 3CS a fuse in the same amperage, i.e. equal to the in-line fuse of relevant part’s original harnesses (i.e. same amperage for the in-line fuse in the horn’s original harness and for the fuse of the corresponding circuit in 3CS, same amperage for the in-line fuse in the auxiliary driving light’s original harness and for the fuse of the corresponding circuit in 3CS, and same amperage for the in-line fuse in the Battery Tender’s pigtail and for the fuse of corresponding circuit in 3CS)? Could there be any other calculation for added security??
for simplicity you can use the same sized fuse as on the accessory harnesses and you'll likely be okay.


Q.4. I think FZs are not CanBUS bikes but I keep seeing references in the forum and I'm confused about including a CanBUS protective diode option in ignition switched lead (i.e. for preventing a possible reverse EMF flow back to the bike, as sellers say). Other than an additional monetary cost of five Dollars, is there any downside of still having them in-line for each switched power source?
diode won't hurt, but it's not strictly necessary (09 doesn't use canbus).


Q.5. Final one: I plan using Posi-Lock branded products especially for connecting the 3CS’s circuits to the harnesses and for connecting the switched power sources of the relays. I searched for Posi-Lock’s patents over patents.google.com and they seemed quite reliable; but do you think these plastic parts will perform as good as Sumitomo’s SL sealed connectors? Note: If I don’t opt for Posi-Lock, I plan to use the sealed connectors without soldering (because I don’t have any experience & hardware) – needless to say, unsoldered tabs may not perform as good as soldered ones. See a comparison of unsoldered & soldered tabs as follows:
View attachment 14061
i've used posilock connectors in the past and they work well. just be aware that the standard posi-locks are not sealed (they do sell 'posi-tite' connectors that are), and they do take up a bit of space.

http://www.posi-products.com/index.html
 
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