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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I should have guessed that the way the bike squirmed sideways when hitting a bump was a clue that the wheels were not aligned.
Well that is fixed now, until the next tire change.
I'm not so sure that using the marks is a good idea unless you can get perpendicular to the frame notches - huh, what... read on















Oh and please do not ask me how to explain the "String method". I have heard people rave over it, tried it once, but I fail to see how it works :)
I have always liked the eclipsing tire method - but as I got older, my eyes can't focus over that distance anymore and glasses introduce errors, so the gauge helps with the eclipsing tire method. Specially as modern rear tires are so much wider than the fronts. Then the straight edge takes out the error factor of using your eyes.
Where did I get the straight edge??? I think it was Home Despot, but I'm not sure - could have been one of the other home supply stores it drove out of business.

Another weekend project for you :)
 

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Anybody that owns a bike for more that a year knows that ALL the axle adjustment marks are off. Some bikes are close...some bikes are way off...but always not right.

I have been using that MOTION PRO ALIGNMENT tool for 10 years and NOTHING is better or more accurate. Highly recommended.
 
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Anybody that owns a bike for more that a year knows that ALL the axle adjustment marks are off. Some bikes are close...some bikes are way off...but always not right.

I have been using that MOTION PRO ALIGNMENT tool for 10 years and NOTHING is better or more accurate. Highly recommended.
Dang, I didn't know that, and I have been riding for my whole life! I guess the issue just never came up before. I wil be getting that tool pronto. Another 5-star thread
 

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Rich's method is more accurate as I said, but it is hard to **** up a 90 degree angle and a srew to tighten it. You can replace the rod with a longer one. Not everyone can create a wheel chock that they have to make exact markings equadistant from a notch in the center of a board that needs to have the proper distance after the notch to the brake disk, all the while not scratching the wheel every time they slide the marginal clearance apparatus through the wheel, then dig up the hopefully straight guide (which I have) and make sure that it is lined up properly and not bumped with ones foot.
 

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Dang, I didn't know that, and I have been riding for my whole life! I guess the issue just never came up before. I wil be getting that tool pronto. Another 5-star thread
As a motocrosser, chain alignment and tire changes are a frequent occurance. The Motion Pro tool takes seconds to set up, and fits in the toolbox. The old screw driver in the sprocket trick to pull the axle tight with the guides is my favorite of all times. I read all of the magazines and stumbled across it years ago and thought the same thing, I had no real idea.
 

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Question: Is it not reliable to accurately measure (both sides of the bike) from the center of the swingarm bolt to the center of the rear axle? At this point if you measure and adjust the rear wheel to have matching distances between the rear axle and swingarm bolt (again on both sides of the bike). I'm thinking this should align the main frame of the bike with the bikes swingarm? Would this method also align the drive chain?
 

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Question: Is it not reliable to accurately measure (both sides of the bike) from the center of the swingarm bolt to the center of the rear axle? At this point if you measure and adjust the rear wheel to have matching distances between the rear axle and swingarm bolt (again on both sides of the bike). I'm thinking this should align the main frame of the bike with the bikes swingarm? Would this method also align the drive chain?
Correct, they make a rod with adjustable pins that do that, and I feel that is the most accurate way.

Dan, I will have to go out in the shop after work tommorrow and see. The tool rides low above the chain. It clears on my CBR and my wife's R6S, and I just use a tactical flashlight kneeled behind to check it. I have done so much stuff on the bike that I have neglected the basics with the exception of quickly checking slack with the finger method. I have only ridden it 4 times for a total of 300 miles. 50 degrees today, rode 40 miles.
 

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Whoa...wait a minute! I'm not talking about that dinky little $20 Motion Pro tool. I'm talking about the Motion Pro chain adjustment RULER that's 3 feet long with adjustable sliders on it. I looked on the Net but I can't find it.

The one I have measures the distance from the center of the swingarm pivot bolt to the center of the rear axle. If the distance is the same on both sides...the rear wheel is in perfect alignment.
 
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Whoa...wait a minute! I'm not talking about that dinky little $20 Motion Pro tool. I'm talking about the Motion Pro chain adjustment RULER that's 3 feet long with adjustable sliders on it. I looked on the Net but I can't find it.

The one I have measures the distance from the center of the swingarm pivot bolt to the center of the rear axle. If the distance is the same on both sides...the rear wheel is in perfect alignment.
I use the dinky one, the rulers were expensive back in the day, but the ruler is the best tool to use if you have sufficient clearance. I am going to take out the rod and see if I can match it up at the supply store and get a longer one. I have been meaning to do that for some time.

DYI to make one:

http://faq.ninja250.org/wiki/How_do_I_adjust_chain/rear_wheel_alignment%3F

Even Simplier:
 

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I use the dinky one, the rulers were expensive back in the day, but the ruler is the best tool to use if you have sufficient clearance. I am going to take out the rod and see if I can match it up at the supply store and get a longer one. I have been meaning to do that for some time.
Doug, do you know the diameter, and current length of the rod?
Mail order is the way to go! I just checked out 1/8" SS rods, you can get them in 1', 2' , 3' & 6' lengths
$8.55 + ship for 304 SS in 6' length, they have other diameters as well, pretty much anything you can imagine
McMaster-Carr
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This looks a lot like the straight edge I have - just without the word Johnson plastered on it.
Johnson 98 in. Aluminum Cutting Guide-J4900 at The Home Depot
I used a 4 foot spirit level to make sure the joint is straight and turned the edge over to nullify any errors.

Previously used for running a hand held circular saw down a length of plywood - or a hand held router guide.
 

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Motion Pro chain tool does better underneath the chain because the chain guard is so long. It is awfully dark in there but good Tactical light would do.



 

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Awesome. I am the kind of guy that would do that if I didn't already have a simple tool that gets me close enough. It is not exact but I used it on dirt bikes for many years.

Motion Pro Chain Alignment Tool

Amazon.com: Motion Pro 08-0048 Chain Alignment Tool: Automotive

Thanks for the video link.
A few noob questions if I may. According to the manual, the locknut torque spec is 12 ft-lb. I'll be attempting this for the first time. Should I use crow feet heads with torque wrench?
Does it matter which one (axle/lock nut) I tighten first?
thanks.

Sent from my SM-G900T using Tapatalk
 

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I have found that the Motion Pro tool is great on dirt bikes but not really easy to deal with on the beveled sprocket of the FZ. Another member mentioned a straight edge ruler starting on the bottom side edge of the chain starting on the sprocket. If all links touch, you are GTG. I never torque the adjuster bolt and nuts, just don't overtighten. Also, I learned to use anti-sieze on the bolt going into the swingarm. Screw it out a bit, apply anti-sieze and screw it back in.. I never tighten the axle bolt past a couple of pounds before I adjusted the chain. Also, the torque numbers in the manual are way too high for the axle nut. You will damage the blocks as others have.
 

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The string method works well if you happen to have two barbells. Using a barbell in front of and to the rear of the bike provides for a long string runs, and allows for the string to be easily moved right or left for proper alignment. I like the above alignment method...but it took me a moment to see that the measurement block was on the front wheel.
 
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