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2016 xsr 900
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Discussion Starter #1
Hoping this will be sort of like the photo of the day - just somewhere we can share things we find cool or that might be useful.
 

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2016 xsr 900
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Discussion Starter #2
I'll kick things off with a few things.
1. Don't assume that because your gear keeps you warm for a 30 minute commute that it will also keep you warm for a multi-hour tour
2. These gloves are not nearly as warm as they look:
IMG_20200608_121408.jpg

3. If you smell something 'hot' (you know that smell?) don't forget to check yourself and the gear your wearing
IMG_20200612_102136.jpg
 

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2020 MT-09
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If your gloves dont cut it on long cold rides I highly recommend a pair of windproof liners!!! They are super thin and do the job. I think I found these at cyclegear years ago. I have only worn my normal leather gloves with these during winters in AZ (there was snow so it was a real winter) and my hands were never freezing where I felt like I needed to put my hands by the engine to warm them up. My friend who told me about liners wears a thin riding glove and them but has heated hand grips.
160088
 

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I have rechargeable heated glove liners. 3-5 hours on a charge. Now that I have heated grips and handguards, I use the glove liners for hunting. They really do the job.
 

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Experienced riders probably know this, but it’s not something that is shared much. When going into a curve, a pretty reliable clue whether to expect gravel on the road is what the shoulder looks like. No gravel shoulder = clean road surface. Gravel shoulder, beware. Nobody ever told me that and I just recently started watching for it. So far, it’s held true on every curve.
 

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That becomes second nature down here Tiger, there's gravel nearly everywhere.
 

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Many years ago I started replacing the little rubber accordion shift lever thingys with a piece of neoprene tubing. The smaller diameter makes it easier to move your boot over and under as you work the shifter.
Thing That Help 008.JPG
 

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2016 xsr 900
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Discussion Starter #9
Many years ago I started replacing the little rubber accordion shift lever thingys with a piece of neoprene tubing. The smaller diameter makes it easier to move your boot over and under as you work the shifter. View attachment 160097
Where do you get the tube?
 

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Where do you get the tube?
Any auto parts store. Oil cooler hose would probably be the best description.
I suppose you could use silicone or vinyl also but I know for sure the black reinforced neoprene will last forever.
 
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So, how do you get knee down with all the loose gravel on the curves?
Easy - one knee, both legs, backside, elbows. in rapid order.
 

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I needed boots and after looking on every motorcycle site imaginable, I decided I didn't want to pay crazy prices for them. I ended up buying a pair of Carhartt work boots. I then took them to a local shoemaker and had then put on a leather top reinforcement on the shifter area for which they charged me about $25. Then I spent $20 on Rhino shoe laces which are Kevlar. As you can see from the picture the shifter reinforcement has absorbed a lot of abuse and it keeps you foot from getting sore on long rides. $20 seems over the top for laces but these things are indestructible. Over a year and there's no sign of wear and they never come untied. They don't even look worn. I figure Carharrt are at very least a better quality boot than similar style dedicated motorcycle boots. they're kind of blackend but are in pretty good shape. I'm almost ready to take them back to the shoemaker and have new soles put on. This is after 13,000 miles.
160104
 

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Glad that works for you. For the kind of riding that I can find myself spontaneously engaged in, a mission specific, high protection moto boot is all I trust my feet, ankles, and lower leg with.
I've seen a guy break his ankle on a gravel driveway. Nobody is bullet proof...

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

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2016 xsr 900
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Discussion Starter #14
Any auto parts store. Oil cooler hose would probably be the best description.
I suppose you could use silicone or vinyl also but I know for sure the black reinforced neoprene will last forever.
ahh, you said Neoprene and I was thinking the material that a scuba wet-suit would be made out of and wondering where you'd find that in tube form. Automotive heater hose or oil/trans cooler hose as you said makes a lot more sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I learned that the EHS (employee Health and Safety) guy at my office is happy to help with outside work topics. I asked him if he had an accurate DB meter that could be used to measure the sound levels of my bike at 'head' height. He said absolutely and met me in the parking lot with a high-end calibrated & OSHA approved decibel meter. In case anyone wants to know a two brothers S1R with the DB killer insert measures 95db at rider head level & 4500 RPM.

FYI 80db is the generally accepted long-term exposure limit, anything higher than that for extended periods will damage your hearing.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Elevation has a big effect on power - if you live & do most of your riding at high altitude be careful when you go down to the coast. I know that the power difference is noticeable and can turn what you expect to be a nice little power wheelie into a 'whoa - glad I was covering the rear brake' moment.

Internet says 3-4% per 1000 feet - that means at my house at roughly 5000ft I'm used to managing about 95HP (114 - ((114*.03) *5). When I ride down to the bay area I'm suddenly managing the full 114 - nearly a 20hp swing in the course of a few hours.
 

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Elevation has a big effect on power - if you live & do most of your riding at high altitude be careful when you go down to the coast. I know that the power difference is noticeable and can turn what you expect to be a nice little power wheelie into a 'whoa - glad I was covering the rear brake' moment.

Internet says 3-4% per 1000 feet - that means at my house at roughly 5000ft I'm used to managing about 95HP (114 - ((114*.03) *5). When I ride down to the bay area I'm suddenly managing the full 114 - nearly a 20hp swing in the course of a few hours.
Free Horsepower, Woo-Hoo! (y)
 

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2017 Hi-Viz and Matte Grey MT-09
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I learned the extent of my endurance. 250 miles over four hours in up to 100-degree (freedom, obviously) heat pretty much does it for me. Can't see myself doing more than that with this bike.
 

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2016 xsr 900
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Discussion Starter #19
I learned that I have abnormally long arms, I guess my arms are like 2 inches longer than the average for someone my size.....
 
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