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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have a different or better understanding of what the FZ-09’s Drive Mode “ actually ” does, and/or what segment of the market is each mode aimed at (if either mode caters to any market segment at all) for this particular bike? I was initially under the impression that the “ Standard ” Mode allowed for full performance of the bike in any condition; the “ A ” Mode - for commuting and fuel efficiency; and the “ B ” Mode - for touring (or possibly returning riders). It would seem as if horsepower would be decreased throughout the power bands in the A and B Modes, respectively. [That’s not an issue – I just want to be clear on the attributes of this feature – which I think adds tremendous value to the FZ-09.]. I know that many (if not all) have seen Yamaha’s explanation of their Dive Mode. However, just in case someone has not had an opportunity to review it verbatim at the original site (2014 Yamaha FZ-09 Features & Benefits), please see a slightly edited version below:

[The FZ-09 is equipped with Yamaha D-MODE (or "Drive Mode"), which is a variable throttle control system that lets the rider choose the optimum engine characteristics for his/her riding situation. Three different throttle-valve control maps ("STD" Mode, "A" Mode, and "B" Mode) can be chosen at will by the rider. "STD" Mode accommodates a wide range of riding conditions, so the rider can enjoy the 3-cylinder engine's linear torque feeling--from slow, cruising speeds all the way up to high-zoot velocity. "A" Mode lets the rider enjoy sharper throttle response in the low- to mid-rpm range than the "STD" Mode. "B" Mode lets the rider enjoy milder throttle response than either the "A" Mode or the "STD" Mode for more relaxed power characteristics.]

So, I’m still not sure if I understand what the benefits of each Mode are, and what types of riders would find either mode helpful as they bond with the FZ-09. [The R1 has an A and B Mode as well. But in my humble opinion, I consider the R1’s “A” Mode to mean, “For The Track” and the “B” Mode to mean, “When Not On The Track.” Simple—I know. “But that’s my story and I’m sticking to it.”]. Any feedback will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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I'm not 100% sure that I'm understanding what your question is. As I understand the Drive mode operation, it will be there to basically change the performance characteristics of the bike. It will affect/change the fuel mapping to the engine. Standard mode sounds like the "Jack of all trades" type of mode, whereas the "A" mode will give you a sharper/quicker throttle response which would require you to be very smooth with your throttle inputs in order to enjoy the mode. Think track day or very spirited riding in the twisties. "B" mode would affect the throttle response by delaying it slightly...making it less "crisp" and possibly even reducing available power to the engine.......think rainy days riding, newer or less experienced rider.

The above is MY interpretation of what the Mode switch will do and how the different modes will function.

When I owned the Aprilia 750 DorsoDuro Motard, it had three different engine maps available for it. The were, as I recall, Touring, Rain, and Sport. The touring mode was your all around riding mode and worked very well for most riders. Rain mode was, well..........Rain Mode! Much less throttle response to help you ride safely in wet conditions. Sport mode was instant throttle response....and I mean that if you even hit a small bump in the road, you could feel the throttle response if you were not a good rider. Very "touchy" lets say. Since I ride on the track quite a lot and have worked on being very, very smooth with my throttle inputs, I usually ran the bike in Sport mode and it certainly added a level of enjoyment to the bike.

So, I'm guessing the the FZ mapping will be somewhat similar and hopefully they will have all the fueling maps worked out to be able to provide flawless fueling for the bike. Of course that will be subject to change when folks start changing the exhaust systems on the bike and will most likely have to add a fuel management device like the Power Commander or ????
 

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what triplethreat said....think of 'a' as track mode and 'b' as rain mode.

if it's the same as on the r1, 'a' mode basically turns the throttle into a quick-turn throttle (~1/5 turn instead of 1/4 to get to wfo).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Tripplethreat, BW---Thanks! I didn’t even consider the A Mode as being a possible selector for Track Days. [Have no idea why I thought of “A” as being a Mode for commuting]. Totally missed that one. I guess I’ll just have to wait and see when (and if) the guys from Moto-USA, Ride Apart, Top Speed, etc…have an opportunity to give their reviews on the Modes. Hopefully the B Mode will serve as a stand-in for commuting as well as being the Mode for inclimate weather and challenging road conditions. That would reconfigure the mapping to help maximize fuel economy. THEN, I’d say the FZ-09 is arguably the best all-around bike and will remain so for the next few years. [Of course I’d have swing a leg over it first…but from the details so far, I’d say it’s probably going to set the bar among the middle weights.] Thanks again guys. Very much appreciate the feedback.
 

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You're welcome! and hopefully I'm correct in my assessment of how it operates.
 

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A mode for track days...... Or for everydays!!! :cool::angel2:
 
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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I found a little more information about the Modes. The statement below is taken directly from “Padgetts Yamaha” in the Show More (or Less) area on Youtube The title is below:

Padgett's Motorcycles - MT09 Running!!
Published on Jul 25, 2013

[…“The bike is equipped with an revolutionary cross plane concept engine, with 850cc. 3 Power mode settings, Standard, B (for rain and slippery conditions) and Full Fat A. Different to other motorcycles this bike does not re-map the fueling, this bike changes the throttle responsiveness, meaning you do not miss fuel the bike.”]

According to the Padgett guys, it seems that I’m in error concerning “re-maping” (that is—until some test rider or the Yamaha folks say differently).

Tripple/BW, Good Call: Looks like it will be all about throttle response and nothing more. Anxious to see how all this plays out. [I posted their vid in the appropriate section. It's a combination of pics, vid, and sound.]
 

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Tripple/BW, Good Call: Looks like it will be all about throttle response and nothing more. Anxious to see how all this plays out.
keep in mind that it's a drive by wire throttle though, so they can do all sorts of things with that, like restrict power (as on the r1 and r6 where full physical throttle past a certain rpm is actually mapped to less than 100%). a mode 'b' with slower throttle response and reduced power everywhere would be a useful rain mode.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Very true BW. There would seem to be countless options that could be employed simply because of the drive by wire technology. That would certainly account for a drop in horsepower – but having no effect on fuel consumption (at least I don't think so). Can’t wait to see what limits this bike has per Mode. Thanks again BW for the clarity. Much appreciated.
 

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I wonder if they would change the actual output of the engine by choking down the tuning, or if they would change the curve to be smoother for a "B" mode. Where the "A" or Track mode would have real spikey throttle response for coming out of fast, hard corners, the "B" would be a more smooth curve to deliver the same power and torque through a longer rev range as you would undoubtedly be rolling on the throttle over a longer period in less than ideal (read: wet) road or track conditions. Triple, correct me if I am wrong. I have yet to get any track time, and when it rains, I become the most upright rider on the planet.

It makes sense to me that they would not want to diminish the actual power that the bike puts out just in case someone in the real world finds themselves next to a rival bike in less than perfect conditions.

F1 and MotoGP races run in the rain all day long. I think the only rule is that if the rain starts prior to the race, and teams have X amount of time to set up, the race runs. Drive by wire has some really amazing capabilities.
 

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The key to riding in the rain on a track is to run rain tires. Here in the south, we frequently get afternoon pop up showers and the track is not much fun on D.O.T. track/race tires, so I have a set of rains mounted on spare wheels and put them on. We have to ride rain or shine as Instructors so a set of rains are the way to go. With rains on, you can run roughly 80 to 85% of your normal lap times.....knee on the deck and all.
 

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I hear ya Nick. I would have never imagined a few years ago riding in the rain at an 85% pace of normal dry track times. I was pretty sceptical when I first tried them and kind of "eased" into it, if you know what I mean. Next thing I know, one of the other Instructors came around me with a knee down through a corner and I said to myself, OK, it's on. Big smiles ensued pretty quickly and I soon became a believer in rain tires.
 

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had another thought on the modes... Fast ... FASTER ........ FASTEST!!!!!
 
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