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Discussion Starter #1
Almost done compiling my parts to to my fog install...but I don't have a switch yet to mount to the handlebars...

Can anyone recommend a sturdy no nonsense, low profile switch I can use to toggle fogs on and off? I have looked on Amazon, eBay, and a few electrical websites geared towards motorcycles but I haven't felt awesome about what I've found.

Any recommendations would be appreciated. Thanks.

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I had a switch like that for the bilge pump on my Super Jet, so maybe look at personal watercraft supply places? Don’t know of any names, sorry...
 

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I want to be seen ALL THE TIME. I have therefore wired the 5W LED spots directly into the Aux power socket under the tank, so that they are always on with the ignition. There isn't a lot of spare room on the bars either after adding a RAM mount.
 

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There are limited positions for locating a switch on the handlebars.
I would recommend locating the switch on the gas tank front cover panel instead.
When I bought my FZ-09 used, there was a USB socket mounted there that wasn't in good shape. I removed it and popped in some plastic plugs to fill the holes. I am attaching a couple of photos of this cover to give you an idea about possible switch locations there.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There are limited positions for locating a switch on the handlebars.
I would recommend locating the switch on the gas tank front cover panel instead.
When I bought my FZ-09 used, there was a USB socket mounted there that wasn't in good shape. I removed it and popped in some plastic plugs to fill the holes. I am attaching a couple of photos of this cover to give you an idea about possible switch locations there.
I've read your thread already. Probably not the direction I'm going to go.

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Discussion Starter #8
I ran my drls as blinkers and will be running the wiring for the drl to aux lights eventually. Will always be on when the ignition is on though.
What does drl(s) mean?

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I want to be seen ALL THE TIME. I have therefore wired the 5W LED spots directly into the Aux power socket under the tank, so that they are always on with the ignition. There isn't a lot of spare room on the bars either after adding a RAM mount.
I had initially thought to do this, and wire them to that without a switch...but I might be trying to do something a tad different than others and unorthodoxly aiming them so I want the on off ability...I had initially had great aspirations to pair them with a gyro sensor but I don't think that's gonna pan out.

https://www.reddit.com/r/AskElectronics/comments/iepz2h
I actually dug out the aux connector under the tank yesterday, that was fun!

Not as difficult to get under there as I had initially thought. Thanks to two-wheelobsession's video for that. Hope I didn't scrunch up anything while doing but from what I could see it was pretty straight forward.
Also going to clean these up and then paint them with some plastidip... tired of looking at their rust brown/red.


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Discussion Starter #12
Video of me riding at night, turning the lights in the vent pods on and off. Bonus points if you see the first deer I had to swerve for. lol.

Holy Cow those are bright.
Are both lights pointed in the same orientation? If the center of the standard headlight pattern was your base line...where are both of those pointed? Angle?

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Haha yeah they're f'ing bright! They totally fix the cornering issue though. I mounted them aimed about 5 degrees to the sides each and slightly high, so they would definitely shine towards tight turns when leaned over. Since they don't have a sharp cutoff they can't be used all the time, so I wired them to the high beam circuit. When the high beams are on, the added lights are also on. High beams fill in the center, added lights flood the sides and stay there when the forks are turned.

Unfortunately it's another one of my "don't try this at home" mods. lol. It took a fair amount of fabrication to get those in there, I wouldn't recommend exactly what I did to anyone else unless you REALLY like pushing yourself on a project. It involved gutting a couple LED light assemblies, machining some aluminum parts and even cutting and grinding the glass pieces. It's all stuff I enjoy doing, and the end result was, as you can see, friggin' amazing!

I post these "don't try this at home" mods so hopefully it will encourage others to push their mod ideas a little bit further than they thought they could do. I'm hoping for people to look at stuff like this and say "Well, that's a little beyond what I'm comfortable doing, but if he can do that, maybe I can surprise myself by doing something that challenges my own skills?"
 

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Haha yeah they're f'ing bright! They totally fix the cornering issue though. I mounted them aimed about 5 degrees to the sides each and slightly high, so they would definitely shine towards tight turns when leaned over. Since they don't have a sharp cutoff they can't be used all the time, so I wired them to the high beam circuit. When the high beams are on, the added lights are also on. High beams fill in the center, added lights flood the sides and stay there when the forks are turned.

Unfortunately it's another one of my "don't try this at home" mods. lol. It took a fair amount of fabrication to get those in there, I wouldn't recommend exactly what I did to anyone else unless you REALLY like pushing yourself on a project. It involved gutting a couple LED light assemblies, machining some aluminum parts and even cutting and grinding the glass pieces. It's all stuff I enjoy doing, and the end result was, as you can see, friggin' amazing!

I post these "don't try this at home" mods so hopefully it will encourage others to push their mod ideas a little bit further than they thought they could do. I'm hoping for people to look at stuff like this and say "Well, that's a little beyond what I'm comfortable doing, but if he can do that, maybe I can surprise myself by doing something that challenges my own skills?"
I did something similar with my old niner and I'm done with the harder fabbing stuff, I think I'll stick with the fork brackets I found, and try to get the angles Right. I do like your idea of wiring them to the high beams...how difficult was that? Or rather, how did you accomplish that?

Wish the Reddit post I linked in here was showing up right...these guys designed some very cool working bulb refractors...wish they had finished, I'd add two more housings on my forks for two more LED projectors and call it a day. Right around when I had the idea for a mechanical version dealing with lean, these guys came up with what they came up with. Brilliant.


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Wiring to the hi beams is easy, it's a yellow/green wire in the right side vent pod. (I'm sure about the yellow part, not so sure about what color the stripe was) That's a ground signal from the high beam switch. Get a small relay, it doesn't need to handle any more than 5 amps or so. Use the aux power tap for + feed to the relay on the field and contact terminals, the yellow/green wire will go on the other side of the field coil and then hook your lights to the output of the relay contacts. Ground the lights themselves and you're done!

If you can't find the high beam switch wire, let me know and I'll pull out the wiring diagram. You can find it by hooking a test light to positive voltage and probing the yellow wire while turning the high beam switch on and off. When the high beam switch is on, it will complete the ground side of your test light and it will light up. Make sense? haha.
 

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Unfortunately it's another one of my "don't try this at home" mods. lol. It took a fair amount of fabrication to get those in there, I wouldn't recommend exactly what I did to anyone else unless you REALLY like pushing yourself on a project. It involved gutting a couple LED light assemblies, machining some aluminum parts and even cutting and grinding the glass pieces. It's all stuff I enjoy doing, and the end result was, as you can see, friggin' amazing!

I post these "don't try this at home" mods so hopefully it will encourage others to push their mod ideas a little bit further than they thought they could do. I'm hoping for people to look at stuff like this and say "Well, that's a little beyond what I'm comfortable doing, but if he can do that, maybe I can surprise myself by doing something that challenges my own skills?"
It was well worth he effort you invested - looks great and makes me wish I had 'pods' on my XSR just so I could shove lights in them like you did!

I've got no input on the OP question about handlebar switches. I would personally go with GMTech's solution and wire mine to the high beams.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It was well worth he effort you invested - looks great and makes me wish I had 'pods' on my XSR just so I could shove lights in them like you did!

I've got no input on the OP question about handlebar switches. I would personally go with GMTech's solution and wire mine to the high beams.
Ya that seems like a legit way to approach the intended purpose... Might need some extra help to accomplish that...where did you source the relay?

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Ya that seems like a legit way to approach the intended purpose... Might need some extra help to accomplish that...where did you source the relay?

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Out of the pile of relays I gathered from work. lol. When you replace a GM fuse block, it comes loaded with relays and fuses so I always saved them before tossing the old fuse block.

You can use a standard Bosch style 30 amp relay but it's hard to find a spot for something that big. The part number for the little GM relays I use a lot is 15328866. They're small but handle decent amperage and are dependable. I would assume you could find them or something similar on Amazon or elsewhere online. Local auto parts store should have them too, they're used a ton on GM cars and trucks.

You can get little terminals that fit those relays, but I usually direct solder wires to them. Use a hot soldering gun, hold the wire on the relay terminal with a pair of hemostats and make sure you take the heat off as soon as the solder melts to the terminal and wire. Putting the hemostat close to the body of the relay will work as a heat sink so the relay internals don't get too hot. Slip a piece of shrink tubing over each of the terminals and you have a nice small relay package.


Here you go, a 5 pack for $19!...

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Agree on everything but the soldering - I'd use connectors (crimped or soldered - users choice) just because eventually that relay is going to wear out and I'd rather plug-n-play a new relay than have to cut & solder the wires again.
Cycleterminal has the 'micro' relays and you can also order the connectors and base that match.

 
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Agree on everything but the soldering - I'd use connectors (crimped or soldered - users choice) just because eventually that relay is going to wear out and I'd rather plug-n-play a new relay than have to cut & solder the wires again.
Cycleterminal has the 'micro' relays and you can also order the connectors and base that match.

Again, agreed but I could go into a giant post about soldering vs. connectors. lol. I was the lead tech in every dealership I worked in and I specialized in driveability and electrical. I could tell you stories for years! Yes, connectors aid in replacement ease, but (IN GENERAL) the chances of the connectors themselves failing for a multitude of reasons is far greater than the chance of relay failure. As a rule, IF I can solder a connection I will. But the other part of that is not everyone knows how to solder correctly so you get failures from improper soldering.

Even the GM engineers fight over this problem of soldering vs. connectors. They had a MAJOR problem with poor connections in airbag connectors causing airbag lights and codes. GM has a policy of not liking techs soldering things because they don't trust that they'll do it correctly. Obviously they don't like design changes after production, which removing a connector to solder directly would be. So when they came out with the recall to replace these connectors, they specified using weather sealed crimp connectors in place of the regular block and terminal connectors. They ended up having a lot of failures from the crimp connectors. No shit! Crimp connectors are the worst for being improperly installed! I fought with the GM engineers on letting me solder the connections on the vehicles they had come back, many of which were in the Buy-Back process from multiple repair visits. I won't say whether I did or did not solder them (lol), but let's just say I never had a single one come back.
 
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