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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I dropped off my bike today to have the recall and a 600 mile service completed. Picked up the bike and rode home to notice smoke rolling out from the engine when I stopped at my house. The shit mechanic never tightened the drain plug and it was missing when I got home. So the remaining oil dumped out on my garage floor and the rear of the bike including tire is soaked in oil. They said the next service is free....FU$# that! They are picking the bike up to clean it and add new oil. My question is, is that tire still ok to ride? I have never soaked one in oil and tried to clean it.
 

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That's awful to hear man. Tire should be fine, but I'd be really careful on it. Might be a good idea to use some dish soap and water a few times to get the oil off.

Tires do contain some oil. The rainbow patterns you see near the chicken stripes is usually oil that has made it's to the surface through heat cycling.

They messed up for sure, but we're human and sometimes we make mistakes. I bet they'll take extra special care of your bike going forward. Some years ago a mechanic let me ride away from my 600 mile service without oil. Bike ran fine for 50k and he always went the extra mile when I brought it in..
 

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I believe a similar thing happened months ago to another member and the dealer replaced his bike IIRC.
yup he didnt make it all the way home - another member ripped his drain plug off going over railroad ties and the oil soaking the tire caused him to low side.

Consider yourself lucky.

There's certainly no shortage of idiot dealers - i would demand a new bike but i'm not sure what your rights are as a consumer and if the dealer is obligated to get you one. If anything they shoudl give you a new tire!

Either way, i wouldn't bring my bike back there even if they gave me $100 for them to do the service.

We're not driving cars out of there, if the oil drops out - you pull over, you're in a nice cozy cage with metal protection and 4 balanced wheels. Their stupid error could have f*cking killed you. I would make that very clear to the morons who worked on your bike (not that they'll give a sh*t, unfortunately).
 

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Sooo, how long was the engine starved for oil? What internal damage has been done?

I'd get a new tire at the dealers expense as well. Clean oil off the tire? That will seem like a swell idea as you low side and break your back on a fence post.

Your bike, your life... But I take both pretty seriously. Your dealer can't even properly change oil...

Free service and CLEAN the tire? Wow... They are still bending you over. They nearly killed you, and quite possibly caused damage to your engine. Just saying...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It had enough oil left in it to make a good mess on my garage floor so I'm not too concerned about engine damage. My main concern was just the tire condition.
 

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Tire manufacturers recommend no than more mild soap to clean tires. Any petroleum product on tires may be absorbed by the rubber and disrupt the carefully thought out and built molecular bonds that make the tire do what it does. I've talked to many tire manufacturer techs and they all say they'd toss a tire exposed to oil, chain lube, solvents, mineral spirits, etc. if it were theirs, though they won't swear a petroleum product will damage the tire. Ever wonder why tire manufacturers don't sell or endorse tire dressing, it would seem like a natural fit. If you have an old tire laying around, try wiping it with kerosene. It disappears immediately into the tire.

You dealer owes you a new tire, if not a new engine also. Also, take the bike to another dealer for the repairs and either the original dealer or Yamaha pick up the bill. If there's any reluctance from the dealer, call the Yamaha area rep and say the incident and Yamaha's response to it is documented and if a tire failure causes an injury or worse, Yamaha may liable.
 

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Triumph had an issue on the newer STR where the countershaft seal would blow, and leak oil all over the rear tire... They replaced all of those tires, no questions asked. Your dealer sucks. I'd be meeting with the manager, and ask why I should ever let them touch my bike again, and not turn everyone I meet, away from them.

It's not just the mistake, it is the proposed remedy that is idiotic.
 

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take lots of pictures - particularly of the tire - the mess on your garage floor - the missing drain bolt - all of it matters. As others have said - if the dealer won't give you a tire (go somewhere else to have it put on) and repair other damage - tell them you're taking the pictures and your experience directly to yamaha corporate.
 

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I recommend getting the event well documented and request the dealer either give you a new bike or a warranty covering the engine for the next 4 years and 50k miles or something like that.

The extended warranty he sells for $700 costs him about $300. That is cheap way for him to give you peace of mind over the future reliability of the engine.

I think a new tire is in order as well as a thorough detailing of the bike.

They taught us in law school that the easiest way to resolve disputes is to resolve them within the business realm of the parties involved.

It would be a tough pill to swallow for the dealer to give you a new bike as that would cost him $2-3k. A warranty cost is much easier for him to swallow.
 

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My last 2 cents - i would take the advice on this thread and then request to delete it until you've come to an agreement with the dealer.

I'd go in asking for a new engine (they don't know how much oil fell out of your bike and when - it's serious either way). I'd settle on the warranty as others claimed if you can't get the new engine.
 

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if they don't offer up a new bike, maybe some free extended warranty would be another option.

They can also get the oil tested to see if there is any excessive engine wear going on. If there is not enough left to test now, they could refill it, have you ride it for a few miles, then send in a sample for testing. If there are any issues it will show up in an oil wear test.
 

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Tire manufacturers recommend no more mild soap to clean tires. Any petroleum product on tires may be absorbed by the rubber and disrupt the carefully thought out and built molecular bonds that make the tire do what it does. I've talked to many tire manufacturer techs and they all say they'd toss a tire exposed to oil, chain lube, solvents, mineral spirits, etc. if it were theirs, though they won't swear a petroleum product will damage the tire. Ever wonder why tire manufacturers don't sell or endorse tire dressing, it would seem like a natural fit. If you have an old tire laying around, try wiping it with kerosene. It disappears immediately into the tire.

You dealer owes you a new tire, if not a new engine also. Also, take the bike to another dealer for the repairs and either the original dealer or Yamaha pick up the bill. If there's any reluctance from the dealer, call the Yamaha area rep and say the incident and Yamaha's response to it is documented and if a tire failure causes an injury or worse, Yamaha may liable.
Alllll of this ^^^^x10
 

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This is exactly why I only bring my bike in for warranty/recall work and do everything possible myself. I even consider doing the warranty work myself depending on the difficulty of the job and time, tools, and materials required. Nobody will ever care about your baby like you do. Changing the oil on the FZ9 only requires the removal of one bolt. If a service tech can't remember to tighten it up before they fill it with oil then they should probably be bagging groceries instead. It takes 10 minutes to change the oil and it costs $15 for supplies. It's almost like your being paid $300/hr for the piece of mind that you actually torqued the 1 lousy bolt to spec...
 

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If a service tech can't remember to tighten it up before they fill it with oil then they should probably be bagging groceries instead. It takes 10 minutes to change the oil and it costs $15 for supplies. It's almost like your being paid $300/hr for the piece of mind that you actually torqued the 1 lousy bolt to spec...
Tech is probably not using a torque wrench, tightening by hand and letting the aluminum threads get to him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'm going in tomorrow to talk with the manager or owner. The way I see it I had a new bike with no issues when I dropped it off. Now the warranty is technically void due to running it without oil. I figure they owe me some additional warranty and a new rear tire. I'm not sure I can put my full trust in that tire after seeing it completely soaked in oil.
 

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If there was any oil at all left in the motor when you arrived home, then the drain plug must have fallen completely off only immediately before you got there. It's probably in your driveway or in the street in front of your house.

This sounds like the outfit I bought my KLX250 from. They delivered it with the oil filler cap missing, no tool kit or owner's manual and the bolts holding the temporary plate on so loose that it fell off during my first ride to my insurance agent's office. I never noticed the missing plate till the cop who found it phoned me a couple days later.
 

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I'm going in tomorrow to talk with the manager or owner. The way I see it I had a new bike with no issues when I dropped it off. Now the warranty is technically void due to running it without oil. I figure they owe me some additional warranty and a new rear tire. I'm not sure I can put my full trust in that tire after seeing it completely soaked in oil.
First of all....you need to DOCUMENT the fact that the Dealership screwed up. The dealership is going to try and cover up what they did....so I would call Yamaha USA on the phone and make sure the call is recorded and who you talked to. The service representative for Yamaha should be calling you back on the phone. If anything goes wrong with the bike in the future...you now have it on record what happened....so they cannot deny responsibility.

DO NOT RETURN THE BIKE TO THE DEALERSHIP BEFORE YOU HEAR BACK FROM YAMAHA USA.

As far as oil goes.....you and I and everyone else, rides over oil and solvents and paint thinners on the road everyday. Oil on your tire means nothing at all if it is thoroughly cleaned off properly. That oil did not destroy your tire.
 
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I'm going in tomorrow to talk with the manager or owner. The way I see it I had a new bike with no issues when I dropped it off. Now the warranty is technically void due to running it without oil. I figure they owe me some additional warranty and a new rear tire. I'm not sure I can put my full trust in that tire after seeing it completely soaked in oil.

I agree with what Motomania posted above & your sensible businesslike approach to resolving this troubling situation. As he stated, it's best to amicably resolve this in such a way that basically covers you 100%, but doesn't cost the Stealership an arm & a leg.....Work it out like businessmen within the confines of your warranty and your rights as the consumer. No doubt, It would be great to be given a new bike, that's not the only acceptable resolution.

Remain soft spoken, but direct. Afterwards document the meeting, and if necessary call Yamaha USA in Calif., and email them a copy of your written notes.....Contacting Yammy should be a last resort. You're covered and they know it......Just remain calm & businesslike, regardless of what they say. If by chance it gets ugly, simply turn around and walk out. Good Luck.:cool:
 
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