Yamaha FZ-09 Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
2016 xsr 900
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I rode this route:
165931




It was hot - like 105+ hot. So hot that even a wet shirt under my jacket only made the heat tollerable.
Aside from that the best part was Georgetown road just past where it branches from hwy 49 north of placerville. Passing lanes, curves, little traffic, and nice new road surface. Mosquito road and ROck creek road have potential, if the pavement wasn't in such poor condition and the local traffic kept things to their side of the road. I was nearly taken out 3 times by oncoming traffic, if I hadn't been hugging the inside of the corners pretty tight this would be an entirely different post.
Darling ridge road is rough also. A nice ride through the forest, but you have to keep the speed down due to the poor surface conditions.
HWY 49 has 2 good sections for running some fast corners, one at the very north end of my ride, and one just outside Placerville. The more northern section just south of Auburn is pretty heavy with traffic.
 

·
Banned
2019 Yamaha MT 10
Joined
·
1,068 Posts
I spent a day riding in southern California 2 years ago and in the afternoon ended up on old Rt66 and then through the Mojave desert. Being from the east coast and being clueless about how to deal with the desert, without exaggeration, I came very close to killing myself from heat stroke. When I got back to my hotel, I was having heart palpitations. Nonetheless, I still felt that this was the best day of my life.
 

·
Registered
2016 xsr 900
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
... the Mojave desert... being clueless about how to deal with the desert....I came very close to killing myself from heat stroke.
This is no joke - I'm glad you made it through Ok.
Anyone else riding in the desert heat are some tips:
1. Drink lots of water, cool but not 'cold'. You have to replace the water your body will loose as sweat.
2. It sounds dumb but close up your gear - you don't want mesh, or all the vents open. You'll actually experience the opposite of wind-chill - I'll call it wind-bake. The air moving over your body will increase your body temperature faster than if you were standing still. You want to reduce the airflow to the point where you can feel a little bit sweaty, so that evaporation can do its thing to help keep you cool.
3. If you can soak the clothes you're wearing under your riding gear with water, and then open 1 vent. The dry air will evaporate the water in your clothes and it will be amazing (and you won't smell like you've been soaking in sweat all day).
4. Be aware of the signs of heat stroke and seek help before you kill yourself.

- note that these tips do not work if you live in one of those hot & humid places like Texas, Florida, etc. Anywhere where your humidity is above 60-70% In those places if you soak your clothes with water you'll just be soggy for your whole ride.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top