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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My 15 year old Craftsman 3/8 and 1/2 inch clicker torque wrenches have never been checked/re-calibrated. So I need to do something, since I bought them electronic torque wrenches and adapters have come on the market.

http://www.amazon.com/ACDelco-ARM602-4-Measurement-Adapter-4-147-6/dp/B004VYURT0/

I'm thinking of getting one of these, to see how much my old wrenches are off. Anyone have experience with these adapters? Also if you have tips for buying and using torque wrenches please post them here.
 

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My guess is that your current tools are as accurate and calibrated as 99% of what is found in a mechanics toolbox

Oh, and your link does not work
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Luke. Maybe my old ones are ok, but I want a way to test them, and that electronic adapter could be handy.
 

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I agree with LL. And there is absolutely nothing wrong with the dial (non-digital) torque wrenches. I bought the in. lb. wrench just a few years ago and I bypassed the digital one for the dial wrench.

If anything just go have it checked and calibrated if needed. And I'm not backing Craftsman at all but they are some of the most accurate. I work with AMT's and they say the Craftsman torque wrenches are as good as the "best" and better than most. And they mostly use snap-on and other brands for their other aircraft tools.
 

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If you're around anywhere that a Snap On truck frequents, you can check your with them(free). Ours has a torque wrench checker mounted inside his truck.
 

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Usually the need for calibration is based on the number of uses... so you could have a 15 year old Craftsman, but if you've only used it 100 times in that 15 years, than it's probably fine (unless you've dropped it or don't return it to its lowest setting after every use).

Here's a way to calibrate it at home:

 

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??.return to zero.that would be unloaded.
One good thing is to torque in increments.
If its 50 ft lbs.then go 30,40 then 50.
Thantos is correct. Its what i ment, my bad, most torque wrenchs will not go down to zero so unload them to the lowest increment when not in use.
 

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I bought craftsman 1\2 inch drive 150 ft/lb clicker type for my rear axle nut. On sale $49 seemed a decent price. Glad to hear crapsman is OK.
 

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All good info - the bottom 20% is not used at work (Lockheed) on click type wrenches because they do get a very big error (on most) down in that range. One thing on the video - you want that string 12" from the center of the drive NOT centered on the handle (or at least know how far it is from the center of the drive and use that for your calc's). On a bending beam wrench centered on the handle would be correct. A big thing to remember is lubed numbers verses dry numbers when you torque fasteners - lubed, even with light oil, can drop what you should go to by 40-60%. Make sure the place you get your numbers from tells you dry or lubed, and with what.
 

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The digitals we have at work have to get calibrated all the time, and they're craftsman, they get used a lot and I think every time the batteries get changed they're rechecked. I think they're more accurate but also far more work.

Sent from my XT901 using Tapatalk
 
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