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Sometimes you eat the bear, sometimes the bear eats you.

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Discussion Starter · #41 · (Edited)
I've been looking for a way to restore some parts and see that there are some small hand held soda / sand blasters but they require a decent compressor. I have a pancake compressor that I use for nail guns but it won't run any other air tools. The problem is that beyond building this Honda, I don't have much long term need for a larger compressor nor do I want to invest $600 - $800. So, I check Craigslist for them and see an old one which I figure is better built and heavier duty than new ones. I found one and it's borderline big enough but I figure it's not worth investing in one that I'm not sure will be viable. I text back and forth with the guy and I tell him I'm gonna pass but thank him for being so patient answering my questions. He was only asking $60 and10 minutes later he texts me back and tells me I can have it for free. He just wants it to go to somebody that will use it. I hopped in my truck along with my Airedale and went and picked it up. Sure enough as I suspected, it's built like a brick shit house and my dog loves going for rides in the truck.

Dog Dog breed Carnivore Companion dog Snout
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I finally started buying stuff and working on this project. I bought an electronic ignition to replace points etc. I also bought the M Unit which runs all of the electronics. It's on back order everywhere so I ended up buying direct from the manufacturer in Germany and it will be available in August. I couldn't figure out why it was so much less than in the US. It turns out the exchange rate is so favorable right now that I saved about $100 even with shipping from Germany. I picked up a bunch of miscellaneous tools and for refinishing metal and I spent about $1000. I started removing the crappy repaint job along with the original Honda paint on the motor. Trying to achieve a polished and refinished motor is a lot of tedious work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Which did you go with?
I ran a Dyna on my GS, and it was a major improvement.
I went with this one. I was dreading doing the electronics and wiring but now am really excited about it. Everything electrical from the ignition to the M Unit to the wiring, lighting and instruments will be cutting edge. I discovered all of this technology out there and it's seriously cool. I had no clue going in to this. Choosing to build a Honda CB makes it substantially easier. There are as many aftermarket parts as there are for an MT 09.

 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
I bought the rest of the electronics from MotoGadget in Germany last night. There are distributors in the US but with the Dollar being so strong against the Euro it ended up costing $836 including shipping. The exact same products purchased here would have been almost $1300. That savings pays for powder coating wheels, frame and fork sliders. These products are way cool. I know that there are amazing electronics on new motorcycles but discovering that they were available for older machines was eye opening. You can blink and technology passes us by. The funny thing is that Motogadget isn't a new company. Their products are well developed, mature and stone cold reliable.

 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
M-Unit arrived from Germany. 8 days....not bad. I've frequently waited that long for products in this country. So I unboxed it and it's hard to believe the capabilities of this thing and that there are so many features built into it. Substantial block of some kind of metal. This little thing is the electronic brain of a motorcycle. I'm still a way off from installing this but with the exchange rate being so advantageous, I couldn't pass. I still have a bunch of other accessories coming in the next few days. It's not lost on me that you have to be a little nuts to get so excited about a pile of parts.

Communication Device Gadget Font Mobile phone battery Electronic device


Calculator Office equipment Office supplies Wood Font
 

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Budo.....If I were you I'd still be recovering from the ride home from NC. Stay cool.
Haha I have ridden about 300 miles since returning. Mostly because I've been working like a madman and it's been way too hot to commute on motorcycle here. When I get the chance I sneak off for a 200 - 300 mile weekend ride. Out at dawn and home by 10 or 11.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
I'm throwing this out there in the hope that someone will bite. I want to pull the top end of this motor and make sure it's all good. I figure I've dropped 2 grand in carburetors and electronics, why not go a little further. I've never done a motor like this. My experience is with 2 stroke motors. I do all of my own work and what I'm looking for is someone that is experienced hand at this stuff that I could call occasionally to ask a few questions as they arise. I'm not a nut and there people here that know me that could verify that......I think. I promise I won't be a nuisance. As far as chassis and suspension stuff, I'm very competent. I'm in the US of course. Anyone out there, PM me.
 

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9800 original miles.
No need to open up the motor. Agree with compression test and better left alone if OK.
Some things are better left virgin, if the miles are that low.
I used to ride a Honda 550 in the 1980's along with Honda 750's and the 550 is a very cool bike. They hit RPM faster than bigger bikes. They can be a screamer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
No need to open up the motor. Agree with compression test and better left alone if OK.
Some things are better left virgin, if the miles are that low.
I used to ride a Honda 550 in the 1980's along with Honda 750's and the 550 is a very cool bike. They hit RPM faster than bigger bikes. They can be a screamer.
I wasn't going to break down the entire motor. I was thinking more along the lines of pulling the heads off and replacing the gaskets and doing a good clean up and inspection. The guy I bought it from was very competent and told me the motor ran and compression tested well.

The carburetor guy says that his carbs wring so much more horsepower out of this motor that the old clutch springs should be replaced because the original ones will slip. This motor only has 9800 miles on it. I don't really know how that equates to a modern motor. I have 26000 miles on my MT10 and it seems like it'll last forever.
 

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I was thinking more along the lines of pulling the heads off and replacing the gaskets and doing a good clean up and inspection.
Personally I would not poke the bear. very low miles - leave it unless something leaks.
The carburetor guy says that his carbs wring so much more horsepower out of this motor that the old clutch springs should be replaced because the original ones will slip
If someone made a habit of high revs then drop the clutch for burnout, then yeah.
I had one of those bikes, they were not known for weak clutch springs.
I would leave the "core" of the bike alone and ride it.
That bike is from the days when they weren't trying to lighten everything and they were built like a tank.
If the FZ - MT is good for 100,000 miles you could double that for an older Honda before having to do major things like compression issues.
Eventually the clutch may need new plates as it approaches 100k, wearable parts that are easy to get to.
 

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In my opinion, pulling the head off with under 10,000 miles will proove to be a waste of time. New head gasket required when head removed...re- assemble and torque down head...put bike together and run it for a bit...then take it all apart again to re-torque the the head.
Compression test tells a lot...but the leak down will tell you more. If it was me, I would do a valve clearance check...leak down test or compression test...and call er done! With that few miles I would think leak down to be single digit as engine is still relatively new! I would base the decision on pulling the head on the results of the the test.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Personally I would not poke the bear. very low miles - leave it unless something leaks.

If someone made a habit of high revs then drop the clutch for burnout, then yeah.
I had one of those bikes, they were not known for weak clutch springs.
I would leave the "core" of the bike alone and ride it.
That bike is from the days when they weren't trying to lighten everything and they were built like a tank.
If the FZ - MT is good for 100,000 miles you could double that for an older Honda before having to do major things like compression issues.
Eventually the clutch may need new plates as it approaches 100k, wearable parts that are easy to get to.
In my opinion, pulling the head off with under 10,000 miles will proove to be a waste of time. New head gasket required when head removed...re- assemble and torque down head...put bike together and run it for a bit...then take it all apart again to re-torque the the head.
Compression test tells a lot...but the leak down will tell you more. If it was me, I would do a valve clearance check...leak down test or compression test...and call er done! With that few miles I would think leak down to be single digit as engine is still relatively new! I would base the decision on pulling the head on the results of the the test
I put this out there because I wanted some good feedback and I think I got it. The only thing that I'm going to do different then is change the clutch springs. It's cheap, easy and I have the motor on a stand for cleaning and refinishing. Murray's Carbs has tested on a real life CB550 and I think his advice is good also.
 

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The only thing that I'm going to do different then is change the clutch springs.
Stiffer springs will also result in having to pull harder on the clutch lever.
No slipper clutch back then. The part # for the stock springs is the same for some of the larger Honda's. They are up to the task for street riding.

Honestly with miles that low I wouldn't open anything on the side cases, etc.
I totally understand the wiring, I still ride an old Honda 750 rewired with custom fuse holders, LED headlight and Skene running lights, turn signals, etc.
I was very frustrated with my carbs until the 2nd time I tore them down and got everything right.
I would have been tempted to update the carbs back then, but if you don't do other stuff (cams, headers, etc to breathe and actually need more fuel or flow capacity) then at least for the way I ride I wouldn't have exceeded my stock carbs capacity. But they are a bitch to rebuild, turn-key would have been nice
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Besides hunting and gathering, I've been working on cleaning up the motor. At some point, someone decided to paint the top end red and the bottom end black. I've seen so many pristine vintage motorcycles over the years and in the back of my mind have always thought, you have to be a little mentally unbalanced to clean repair and refinish old corroded rusty parts. Now I can verify that it borders on mental illness. i dropped my Dremel within the first 10 minutes of starting and bought a new one. In 2 weeks I have worn it out, taken it back and bought a bigger one. I've gone through over 65 of those little brass wire wheels and bought another 35 from Master-Carr. The process of building it is the challenge for me. I am totally hooked on the performance of modern motorcycles and no matter what I do as far as performance upgrades will be underwhelming on this little Honda.
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
I'm done stripping off the paint and now am sanding out the rough spots. The guy I bought it from was a good fabricator but scratched up the motor pretty bad in his attempt to strip the paint off. I've watched a bunch of videos on prepping and painting motors. It seems like in every case the prep work sucks and when they pan in and you see the paint, it looks like shit. I'm not trying to achieve show quality but as in construction, if you don't do the basic grunt work, the finished product probably will look like shit. I took a break from sanding motor and wet sanded and polished out one of the outer case covers. Came out good and I'm looking forward to getting the rest of the motor painted and start putting it back together. More parts came and more are coming. I'm over the 2K mark but hey, what else do I have to waste money on.
Crankset Automotive tire Wood Rim Motor vehicle
 
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