Yamaha FZ-09 Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Zloikish, Just a general word about tires.
If you are going to ride it aggressively, I am not sure the D616 is the best choice. Better to go with the Sportmax Q3 or Pilot Road 3, or Pilot Power 3. But none of these will give you great tire wear.
Essentially, one tire does not fit all, as far as riding habits are concerned. A softer tread will give you better handling, so a dual compound tire is preferred for canyon carving, but will not give you as good mileage as a harder compound. The D616 runs rather cool, so mileage should be better than the above mentioned tires, which are dual compound.
Eolith: So sorry about the crash, You are exactly right about the Sportmax D214. They must be warm to handle at all. Also, tire pressure HAS to be no more than 30-31 lbs. I don't ride under 50 degrees with them as I can't warm them up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
The "Dunlop Sportmax D214" tire that is on about 1/2 of the FZ09's produced is made in Japan by Sumitomo Tire Company and is nowhere near as good as a Q2 or Q3. As I mentioned in another thread, spirited riding on them requires 30-31 lbs., no more, and well warmed up. If you run them at the factory recommended pressure of 42 rear and 36 front----well, aahhh-- just be careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Apparently, just like the automobile manuals, some things just cannot be trusted. For example, car manuals usually state oil changes at 7,000 miles. Really? Really? Oil protection begins to break down almost immediately. Common sense tells me 3,000 miles is assuredly NOT too early to change your oil, but 7,000 miles is absolutely too late, if you want your engine to last.
Motorcycle manuals are not written by experts due to the inaccuracy of some things written in them, and I suspect they copy verbatim other manuals that have been written many years ago, which are totally out of date and incorrect for today's machines.
If you are an experienced rider who loves the twisties, would you go by the recommended pressure of 36 front and 42 rear? Hell, no! The same goes for break in, oil change intervals, etc.
The big problem is new or inexperienced riders probably go by the book. They cannot be blamed for using 42 lbs. in the rear tire, because that's what the manual says!
There are many people on this forum who provide great information, and new riders (as well as old timers) would be well served by taking advantage of this free service. I learn something new every day, perusing and exploring this forum. And I've been riding for 55 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Truth to tell, Doug, my first bike (a brand new 1961 Honda 50 Sport), had a manual that was absolutely unbelievable. I wish I still had it. But back then, manuals began with the "Japanese Highway Code" and translation to English was not their strong suit. Here, for the entertainment of the forum, are some of the Rules of the Road:
"Go soothingly on the grease-mud, as there lurks the skid demon".
"At the rise of the hand of the policeman, stop rapidly. Do not pass him or disrespect him".
"Give big space to the festive dog that makes sport in the roadway. Avoid entanglement of the dog with your wheelspokes".
"When a passenger of the foot hove in sight, tootle the horn to him melodiously at first. If he still obstacles your passageway, tootle him with vigor and express by word of mouth, "Hi, Hi"".
"Press the brake of the foot as you roll around the corners to save the collapse of the wheel and tie-up"
Good grief! My first bike and we had to translate the translation!
Things sure have changed..
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top