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Hello and first post! I have had my FZ for 5 months now and just did my 5,555 mile last night. I have decided its time for some wiring work and suspension work in the near future.
I am working on designing a brighter / cooler looking / safer front and front side lighting system for the FZ-09.

here is the description:

FZ-09 Lighting project Idea:
2 angle eyes: one is in the back of the projector housing and blocked from facing forward, but will be allowed to emit sideways 'warming' the housing. OEM white running lights will be left in place to 'warm' edges of housing. second angle eye will be in the front of the housing facing forward and not allowed to emit sideways. *possibly* holes drilled in the projector housing could allow front facing angle eye to have a design.

projector bulb: wired to the high beam position switch for night riding

blinkers: side facing /running blinkers in OEM position, additional blinkers in fake intakes

Passing / warning switch: wired to 4 bright white LEDs in fake grills

any technical, aesthetic, or build / parts advice would be excellent!

 

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Great plan. Side and forward facing blinkers make a lot of sense. The only thing I'd do differently is wire a louder horn to the flash to pass switch instead of lights, which I've done on mine. Since your priority seems to be increasing other drivers awareness of your presence, your horn is another option when needed. Flash to pass is a lot more common in Europe, so people understand the meaning a little better than here, especially Florida. I'm running a Stebel Nautilus air horn and really like the sound.

I'm sure you'll get a lot of input on your ideas. Good luck.

Welcome to our forum.
 

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A red DRL may to go over well with your local smokies, otherwise nice setup.
 

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Great plan. Side and forward facing blinkers make a lot of sense. The only thing I'd do differently is wire a louder horn to the flash to pass switch instead of lights, which I've done on mine. Since your priority seems to be increasing other drivers awareness of your presence, your horn is another option when needed. Flash to pass is a lot more common in Europe, so people understand the meaning a little better than here, especially Florida. I'm running a Stebel Nautilus air horn and really like the sound.

I'm sure you'll get a lot of input on your ideas. Good luck.

Welcome to our forum.
I will def look into that, I am not a big fan of revving up to get peoples attention, and I almost never use my horn unless I bump it, but I also totally support loud horns cause when you need em they rock! how easy was the install? is there a compressor?

Cool... lot of work for just lights though.
I really enjoy projects that keep my mind active afterwork, out of the box solutions are a job requirement so if I make all of life that way its easier.

A red DRL may to go over well with your local smokies, otherwise nice setup.
ya I figured the housing design and top angel eye would change( red is menacing and badass but to aggressive/illegal for everyday). right now I think its going to be a white/blue/UV square angel eye for the front one on the Apollo 2.0 projector housing, and then a soft white/lite yellow rear facing DRL to warm the housing. if I decide to change the edge lights in the main housing to LED then would do the rear DRL in a matching color and do UV/ Blue for sure on the front angel eye!
 

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Pretty straight forward install on the horn. The hardest part is where to locate it. It's too big to replace the stock horn, since the fender could smash into it on a bad bump in the road. I managed to squeeze mine into the area under the rear end of the gas tank. This location keeps it dry and it's still plenty loud.

Air horns draw up around 10 amps, so you could fry the horn switch if you wired it direct like the old horn. You need to use a relay, typically available as a Stebel option. You also need a dedicated fuse holder and fuse for about 20 amps being sized greater than the horn draw. Another option sold with the horn. I mounted my relay in the original horn location. The relay coil is wired to your horn button, so you just plug the original horn wires into the coil terminals. One relay contact is wired to your battery positive through your new fuse on one side and the other relay contact goes back to the new horn compressor. From the second contact on your horn, the wire goes back to the battery negative terminal.

So, you hit the horn button, it energizes the coil which closes the contacts creating a circuit between your battery and the air horn. I ran the wires from the relay contacts down under the middle of the gas tank to the horn and battery. I also rewired the left side grip switchgear by resoldering the horn wires to the flash to pass switch. Quick easy horn activation in an emergency.

Everything works great and I'm very happy with the new setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Pretty straight forward install on the horn. The hardest part is where to locate it. It's too big to replace the stock horn, since the fender could smash into it on a bad bump in the road. I managed to squeeze mine into the area under the rear end of the gas tank. This location keeps it dry and it's still plenty loud.

Air horns draw up around 10 amps, so you could fry the horn switch if you wired it direct like the old horn. You need to use a relay, typically available as a Stebel option. You also need a dedicated fuse holder and fuse for about 20 amps being sized greater than the horn draw. Another option sold with the horn. I mounted my relay in the original horn location. The relay coil is wired to your horn button, so you just plug the original horn wires into the coil terminals. One relay contact is wired to your battery positive through your new fuse on one side and the other relay contact goes back to the new horn compressor. From the second contact on your horn, the wire goes back to the battery negative terminal.

So, you hit the horn button, it energizes the coil which closes the contacts creating a circuit between your battery and the air horn. I ran the wires from the relay contacts down under the middle of the gas tank to the horn and battery. I also rewired the left side grip switchgear by resoldering the horn wires to the flash to pass switch. Quick easy horn activation in an emergency.

Everything works great and I'm very happy with the new setup.
nice! i really want this bike to look at OEM as possible, I really like sleepers, hence resessing all the lights on this conversion, next week when i have some time I will look into that horn some more
 
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