Yamaha FZ-09 Forum banner

21 - 40 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
lol at keeping the screen name. idk, maybe, maybe not. 39 y.o. and no i haven’t done any motorized two wheel riding before. my training class is booked until january, so no i haven’t.i know what counter steering is in theory but didnt test it on any corners yesterday. i did understand how the bike would turn over 12 mph but didn’t feel comfortable attempting it. i did all straight line riding except a few turns at the end of my cul-de-sac. i live in a semi rural neighborhood and was also doing straight line riding up and down the road. i got to a T in the road made my like 9th uturn and it went all bad after that. i always had an yearning for riding but never had opportunity or luxury of owning one. i do have full coverage. lastly i chose the mt09 out of the few bikes that the salesman said would fit my inexperience or experience level. i just liked the way it looked, i didn’t do any research pass that until after i made the purchase. i was told that the bike would and could be a little torquey but with the modes all the way down and proper restraint that i should be fine. i handled the bike with ease all day until that turn. my shifting wasn’t the best but i was getting it and i honestly felt fine on it. Not overly confident but i was humbled quickly. i felt fine about my selection after riding it but that is changing with all of the comments i’m getting about it not being a beginners bike. i got now so i’m really unsure of what to do next. i have a few rider buddies and made a new one with the guy that helped me out yesterday. they are all about 50/50 on my selection of the mt09.
Wow, so many questions for @1stRide1stCrash

  • How old are you?
  • Have you ridden any motorcycles before this?
  • Have you taken any kind of rider training course?
  • Do you know how to countersteer?
  • Do you know what countersteering is?
  • What prompted you to start riding motorcycles?
  • How did you decide on the MT09?
  • Do you have full coverage insurance on it?
  • Do you intend to keep that screen name?
Wow, so many questions for @1stRide1stCrash

  • How old are you?
  • Have you ridden any motorcycles before this?
  • Have you taken any kind of rider training course?
  • Do you know how to countersteer?
  • Do you know what countersteering is?
  • What prompted you to start riding motorcycles?
  • How did you decide on the MT09?
  • Do you have full coverage insurance on it?
  • Do you intend to keep that screen name?
Wow, so many questions for @1stRide1stCrash

  • How old are you?
  • Have you ridden any motorcycles before this?
  • Have you taken any kind of rider training course?
  • Do you know how to countersteer?
  • Do you know what countersteering is?
  • What prompted you to start riding motorcycles?
  • How did you decide on the MT09?
  • Do you have full coverage insurance on it?
  • Do you intend to keep that screen name?
lol atkeeping same screen name
Wow, so many questions for @1stRide1stCrash

  • How old are you?
  • Have you ridden any motorcycles before this?
  • Have you taken any kind of rider training course?
  • Do you know how to countersteer?
  • Do you know what countersteering is?
  • What prompted you to start riding motorcycles?
  • How did you decide on the MT09?
  • Do you have full coverage insurance on it?
  • Do you intend to keep that screen name?
 

·
Registered
2016 XSR900 60th Anniv. Edition
Joined
·
2,011 Posts
My suggestion:

Submit your insurance claim. Get the bike fixed completely - as close to new condition as you can - and then sell it. Use the money to put a deposit on an MT03, which looks just like the 09. If possible, find another dealer who cares a little more about you, and not so much about his commission. Then, wait until you take your training course before you pick it up.

The course will teach you some invaluable skills - on their bike - that you must possess to survive on two wheels. These are skills that are really difficult to get across on paper, or even in videos, but can be taught easily in person by a qualified instructor.

Then go pick up your new MT03. Hopefully you’ll have enough money left to pay your now-even-more-expensive insurance premium. With your newly acquired skills from riding school, you’ll realize how much fun a lightweight bike can be. After a couple of years, if you end up enjoying the crap out of your 03, but you find yourself wringing its little neck because it can’t keep up with your massive talents, then think about moving up to a bigger bike.

You got really lucky this time. Motorcycles don’t behave like cars and trucks, and riding one without understanding the basic physics of how they go, stop, and turn can turn you into a hood ornament before you can blink.

(Oh, and you only need to hit the “quote” button once... 😉)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
My suggestion:

Submit your insurance claim. Get the bike fixed completely - as close to new condition as you can - and then sell it. Use the money to put a deposit on an MT03, which looks just like the 09. If possible, find another dealer who cares a little more about you, and not so much about his commission. Then, wait until you take your training course before you pick it up.

The course will teach you some invaluable skills - on their bike - that you must possess to survive on two wheels. These are skills that are really difficult to get across on paper, or even in videos, but can be taught easily in person by a qualified instructor.

Then go pick up your new MT03. Hopefully you’ll have enough money left to pay your now-even-more-expensive insurance premium. With your newly acquired skills from riding school, you’ll realize how much fun a lightweight bike can be. After a couple of years, if you end up enjoying the crap out of your 03, but you find yourself wringing its little neck because it can’t keep up with your massive talents, then think about moving up to a bigger bike.

You got really lucky this time. Motorcycles don’t behave like cars and trucks, and riding one without understanding the basic physics of how they go, stop, and turn can turn you into a hood ornament before you can blink.

(Oh, and you only need to hit the “quote” button once... 😉)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
yea i got insurance but i don’t want to use it so damn soon. to me, the forks look fine but the dude said i might need it. the headlight works fine. the handle bars aren’t all the way straight
The frame is probably bent and it will never ride well.

Use the insurance, cash out, get R3 or Ninja 400, learn to ride it to its full potential, you will end up being much, much faster rider in the end, honestly. I spent a year on Ninja 250, wringing its neck while the experiences were being wired into my muscular memory, and I would not be alive today if I haven't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
i’m not even sure i completed a full u turn that time. i know i was attempting one, and almost done with the turn. the next thing i know, i hear the throttle, the bike pulls, i keep hearing the throttle with every jerk while going towards the ditch. i’m thankful that it wasn’t worse but i’m pissed that my brain didn’t even attempt a plan b. i didn’t think not once to pull brake, pull in the clutch or hit the kill switch. it’s like i willingly went along for the ride. that’s what pisses me off the most.
I have good news for you - you are absolutely on the right track. The reason your brain didn't attempt to do anything is because on a motorcycle, things are happing too fast for the conscious part of the brain to react in time, you will need to spend months and month programming your lower brain to do it automatically. I highly suggest reading this book:
It's a bit dry and pedantic, but muscle yourself through it!

You're very lucky you didn't "pull brake, pull in the clutch or hit the kill switch", you would end up much worse off, those are very, very wrong things to do in your situation. What you should've done is geeeeently and smooooothly ease the throttle while engaging the front and rear brake, and steer yourself back to the road. You cannot do it by just thinking it in an emergency, your lower brain needs to know the moves while your upper brain instructs it what to do while your conscious brain watches out for surrounding cars and other obstacles.

On a 250cc bike, all these things are happening much slower, so you're giving yourself a chance to learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,126 Posts
We've all done stupid crap, it's a quick way of learning.
The most amazing thing about your story is a Harley rider stopping to help.
 

·
Registered
2016 XSR900 60th Anniv. Edition
Joined
·
2,011 Posts
We've all done stupid crap, it's a quick way of learning.
The most amazing thing about your story is a Harley rider stopping to help.
...But then told him, “You don’t need no front fender anyways!” 🤦🏻‍♂️

BTW, it’s only learning if you figured out what you did wrong. Otherwise, it’s just punishment for not taking lessons in the first place...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
Glad to hear you're alright and learned from this. Like most of the rest though, I agree that this bike is too much for a beginner regardless of the stories of people starting on B mode.

Personally, I love my 09, but I definitely miss the days of ringing out my 250 to 12000rpm and a brisk speed of 96mph. It wasn't fast, but damn I felt smooth on that bike. I'll be buying an R3 someday just for the slow thrills.

If you can find a cheap 07, plus a good dose of training and maybe a viewing of a twist of the wrist you'll be back into it before you know.

And if the insurance asks about your permit, you've got a new motorcycle friend to say he was with you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #30
thanks for the heads up. i can’t imagine what A mode feels like. i am going to do the training. i just hate to just take an L and give up like that. what do you have now?
Glad to hear you're alright and learned from this. Like most of the rest though, I agree that this bike is too much for a beginner regardless of the stories of people starting on B mode.

Personally, I love my 09, but I definitely miss the days of ringing out my 250 to 12000rpm and a brisk speed of 96mph. It wasn't fast, but damn I felt smooth on that bike. I'll be buying an R3 someday just for the slow thrills.

If you can find a cheap 07, plus a good dose of training and maybe a viewing of a twist of the wrist you'll be back into it before you know.

And if the insurance asks about your permit, you've got a new motorcycle friend to say he was with you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
I have an 18 MT09, vcyclenut flash, akra ti exhaust, and some farkles. It's a lot of bike.
I started on an 89 ninja that was streetfightered poorly, and was an absolute death trap. I had the 250 gifted to me and I loved that thing before I decided to get the 09.

The only thing I'd be curious about was how much throttle play you had before the accident. When I picked up mine the guy must have never checked it, it was damn near 10mm and felt snappy and unresponsive, and now it's pretty much near zero and tamer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
when i say i’m a virgin, i mean it. my throttle play was that day. it may sound crazy but i didn’t have any issues with the throttle. i wasn’t overdoing it, i was ok. it was that one time i pulled it after the uturn and the response i got was completely foreign to me and i didn’t know how to respond or react. i mean, i was told how to respond but it wasn’t in my muscle memory so i had nothing to combat the motion effectively. i had all my senses but no brain activity. somebody mentioned earlier in a post that it may have been target fixation and they’re more than likely right because i hit exactly what i was looking at. i didn’t travel far and the first pull wasn’t violent. it was the pulls after the first that kept me in the wrong direction. i traveled maybe about 10 feet then bang! i never heard the term streetfightered until the harley dude mentioned it to me. he suggested to forget the claim and streetfighter it out. it may be possible but the bike has too many components for me to take that chance and i know it can get costly.
I have an 18 MT09, vcyclenut flash, akra ti exhaust, and some farkles. It's a lot of bike.
I started on an 89 ninja that was streetfightered poorly, and was an absolute death trap. I had the 250 gifted to me and I loved that thing before I decided to get the 09.

The only thing I'd be curious about was how much throttle play you had before the accident. When I picked up mine the guy must have never checked it, it was damn near 10mm and felt snappy and unresponsive, and now it's pretty much near zero and tamer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
bro just get yourself a sweet mt07. and see you again in 3 years with a mt09




sometimes when you panic you do things randomly. you were probably oh shit to much throttle and then you shut it off and then you grab more throttle and fly you go.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Moto26

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
i hear you and i might just do just that.but i can’t act like i can just go out there and buy another one cause this one didn’t quite work out for me. ima have to figure it out cause i don’t think the bike will be totaled out.
bro just get yourself a sweet mt07. and see you again in 3 years with a mt09




sometimes when you panic you do things randomly. you were probably oh shit to much throttle and then you shut it off and then you grab more throttle and fly you go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
that shit looks super dope with the retrofit headlamp. i like that a lot.
i hear you and i might just do just that.but i can’t act like i can just go out there and buy another one cause this one didn’t quite work out for me. ima have to figure it out cause i don’t think the bike will be totaled out.
 

·
Registered
2018 mt09
Joined
·
8 Posts
I started on a mt09 with no experience ever on a bike I road it a hour home from dealership to, if I go back I wouldn't recommend it just like these guys been saying I'd rather have maxed out a 300. I like to stretch my limits to if you like that you gone crash at some point on a bike. Good to see u came out fine tho
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
my throttle play was that day.
Hmm... Much learning to do you have!

Throttle play means an adjustment of the steel braided line that goes from throttle to throttle body. There should be some amount ( not sure how much right now ) of free play on twisting the throttle before it actually engages the line.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Darf

·
Registered
'16 FZ09, Blue
Joined
·
79 Posts
Just got a 2020 mt09 6 days ago, finally got to ride it after work and took a dive on my first day. I was doing great for about an hour and surprised myself. Thought i had the hang of it then made a move that would’ve guaranteed me a million views. Made a smooth u-turn, pulled on the throttle and next thing i know, i’m headed for a ditch and a wired cow post. The bike lurched forward and like the absolute rookie that i am (first bike), the momentum kept me pulling the throttle. I rodeoed it all the way into a ditch and a cattle fence (wood&wire). literally, with one hand on throttle and left hand in the air and didn’t come close to 8 seconds. A coolass harley rider luckily was driving by with his wife and saw me on the side, bike stuck in fence and me in the ditch with a very bruised ego, busted bike and busted shin. without any hesitation, he helped me out of the ditch. he chilled and shot the shit with me to make sure i was all good. i was still a little shaky so he disconnected all my loose pieces, put me in shotgun with his wife to ride me home while he followed on my bike. he even offered to help me garage fix it. i can’t begin to express how cool that was. i hit him off some dough through cash app asap cause he didn’t have to do shit. He said that i would need new forks, module, headlight fairing and front tire fairing, which he suggested i delete anyway. i deleted the front of the bike so i guess i was steps ahead of his suggestion tho. im a first time rider, this is my first forum post (ever). he suggested i get on one to get some ideas. headlights still work, gas tank has a small dent and bike still rides fine minus the bars being slightly cocked to the side. i have enclosed photos. looking for help and any ideas. please!!!
Don't take this in a bad way, get yourself a smaller 4 stroke dirt bike and learn to ride. Then get an underpowered street bike and learn to ride that. Then proceed to whatever. Just sayin. But glad you're ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
First off, I'm glad you're OK. I was in a bad crash in 2008 on my Honda '03 CBR600RR. I still have the scars to remind me of that day. If I hadn't been wearing a helmet I'd be dead. But that's a moot point as I always wear my helmet.

I'm not gonna say much as everyone else as already said it...
  • FZ/MT09 is not a beginner bike!
  • You have insurance, use it. I rebuilt the 600RR I mentioned above. For all the money and time I spent rebuilding it, I could've bought a used F4i or 600RR.
  • With the insurance payout, buy a MT03, 2014-2016 FZ07, or second generation Suzuki SV650.

I've been riding for 30 years and my '17 FZ09 was an entirely new experience for me. The low end torque still gets me to this date even with a Vcyclenut tune.
 

·
Registered
2017 Hi-Viz and Matte Grey MT-09
Joined
·
456 Posts
I'll start by saying I don't disagree with anyone here: the MT-09 isn't a beginner bike and this is a good example why. Simple mistakes are amplified by the instant torque and (relatively speaking) high horsepower.

With that being said: my wife has only ridden the Suzuki TU250X at the MSF course and my MT-09, and hasn't had an issue (aside from stalling it and then dropping it once on our old steep driveway. RIP TST turn signal - you were gone too soon). The key is training and respect, with a healthy dose of maturity for good measure. The first thing she did after going through the MSF course was take the MT-09 to a very large, very empty parking lot and did the same drills she did on the TU250. Clutch in, clutch out, clutch in, clutch out. Figure 8s. Panic stops. Etc, etc. Then the next weekend, she tooled around in the backroads getting used to how the bike handled and accelerated in the 35-45 mph range without any other traffic. Finally after about two weeks of working up to it, went to on the highway and populated roads. She still leaves it in B mode and TC2 even after having it a couple of years now.

I still wouldn't recommend it for anyone as a beginner bike. I only say this because I understand you've already bought the bike and don't want to take a bath on it. The first thing you should do is talk to your insurance and see what they have to say. If it's totaled, definitely look at a more approachable bike as the replacement. The second thing you should be doing is looking for an MSF course (or two) - which you say you've already done. Regardless of what bike you end up on, training is invaluable.
 
21 - 40 of 40 Posts
Top