Yamaha FZ-09 Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know I could search but im late for work and want some info to go get the needed items after work so.

I have 2 oil changes so far and both were done at the dealer. Both used standard oil that the dealer uses and a filter (yamaha element 5gh-13440-50-00), drain plug gasket (yamaha 214-11198-01-00).

Oil change # 1 was at 500 miles and # 2 was at 1000 miles.

I am coming up on 3000 miles and will do and all subsequent changes myself.


Here are my questions:

Should I stick with the yamaha filter or go with a KN or other. ( I read that the yamaha filter is a special design)

What type of oil are the masses recommending. I was going to go with Yamalube 15-50 synthetic.

Finally, I do not have a torque wrench should I just get one or is it not really necessary. the drain plug is to be set at 31 ft-lbs


Thanks for your help. I posted this here because this thread has the most traction and I wanted some help ASAP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
Yes bro... There are services on bikes that i firmly believe should be left to the pro's... Oil change is not one.. Remember, it's not the mechanic's bike, that tenderness you project on your own bike because you care does not exist with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,842 Posts
I'm going with the k&n filter on my next change just because it's easier to take on and off.

3k still seems low to switch to synthetic but I'm not an expert. Personally I'm not switching till 5k.

I don't use a torque wrench on the drain bolt. I had tighten the oil filter and and use a standard socket set on the drain bolt for tightening.

You may want to buy a couple of crush washers. These sometimes get messed up when undoing the drain bolt.

Also make sure if you buy an oil drain pan that it's low profile. The FZ clearance is slim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,413 Posts
If you don't have a torque wrench just make sure you don't over tighten the drain plug. Make sure the oil you buy is designed for 4 stroke motorcycles. Go to your local auto parts store website to check in store inventory. I use the K&N filter because it has the nut on it that is the same size at the drain bolt "17MM" if I remember correctly. I would use part synthetic or full synthetic. Not that much more money, and it will last longer and not break down as quick in the heat of the summer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
I have only changed the oil once and used a Yamaha filter and Yamalube 10W40. I agree that motorcycle specific oil is very important as it has friction modifiers for the clutch plates. JASO MA approved (Japanese Automotive Sciences Organization Motorcycle Approved- I think that's what it means) oil would be best. I am in the auto repair industry and have talked with oil "experts" and I don't know that synthetic oil should increase your change interval. Since bikes have unitized construction the oil also lubricates the transmission. The gears in the trans have a shearing effect that cut up the visçous fibers in the oil breaking it down quicker than a car engine. You should not exceed 2k between changes. If you are changing it often I don't know that synthetic is necessary. I plan on using Valvoline for motorcycles next time. And possibly the K & N filter. One final thought about the drain plug. I used a torque wrench and it was getting way too tight. So I went by feel which is easy for me I tighten bolts all day. I have heard of guys stripping out the oil pan so be careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,802 Posts
I use the Yamaha filter. It comes pre lubricated so you don't need to smear oil on the seal. As far as torque its really a feel thing with spin on filters.

On my bike the filter bottoms out about the same tightness as I would do on my cars. Don't know is this is just dumb luck or perhaps Yamaha designed it that way so it would not get over tightened.

Oil I use is Rotella Synthetic which only comes in 5w-40 weight.

Friendly FYI: There are only a hand full of oils that are true synthetic, ie made in the lab and not pumped out of the ground. Amsoil, Redline are a couple that come to mind.

There are many oils that are labeled "Synthetic" or "Full Synthetic" but are not. Mobil 1, Castrol Synthetic, Shell Rotella Synthetic and a number of others fall into this category.

Many of these are really good oils but they are actually just more highly refined petro oils that came out of the ground. Standard automotive oils mostly use class 1 base stock. These "synthetics" use class 2 and 3 base stocks which are more highly refined, ie have fewer impurities in them due to a more stringent refining process. Then the manufacturers add to these "synthetics" a very high quality additive package.

The result of this process yields an oil that performs close to the true synthetics at a much cheaper cost.

Regarding how often to change your oil just remember that a motorcycle engine is much harder on oil that your car is for several reasons.

1. Motorcycles run much higher RPM's than your car.

2. Motorcycle engines share the oil with the transmission and clutch. This causes the oil to "Shear out of Spec" rather quickly compared to your car. Shearing out of spec means you may start with say 50 weight oil and in 1000 miles it now has properties of a 30 weight oil. This is not not a formula but just an illustration.

Summery IMO: Change your oil often and use a high quality oil. I change mine every 1000 to 1500 miles depending on the type or riding. Mostly canyons at 1000. Mostly highway at 1500.

Do your own research on oil. I did and discovered that Rotella Synthetic was one of the best bangs for your buck. My research was from independent labs and engine builders, not the oil companies or distributors.

Don't go cheap on filters and if you use automotive filters choose wisely. There are some excellent automotive filters out there but be careful. For example Purolater Pure One is a great filter. It uses more media (filtering material) than most of the others but in some applications this causes a drop in oil pressure on the engine. I tried one on my Ninja 1000 but changed it out as it took a very long time for the oil pressure red light to extinguish on start up.

Happy changing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,330 Posts
Everyone has their favorite oil.

My rule is simple, change the oil at about 2.5 k intervals. If the oil you bought is too expensive to change that often, then buy cheaper oil. Even cheaper oils are shown to last well past the 2.5k interval.

I change the oil because oil is the blood of an engine and cleaner oil is better. Oils also absorb combustion byproducts that are not filtered out by the filter.

As for the filter, there are many to choose from. They are all pretty much the same. Just don't over tighten them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
I agree with most of the previous posts, but I have a couple of points. If you aren't used to working on mechanical things, I suggest buying a torque wrench. In the long run, it's cheaper and easier than installing a time sert from over torque. I wouldn't concern myself with the nut on the end of the K&N filter. The filter can easily be removed via the left side using large sliding arc-joint (channel lock, water pump) pliers. Crush washers can be reused providing they don't leak. Sure you can replace them every time, but I'm frugal (ie. cheap), and it's not necessary. My opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,842 Posts
Friendly FYI: There are only a hand full of oils that are true synthetic, ie made in the lab and not pumped out of the ground. Amsoil, Redline are a couple that come to mind.

There are many oils that are labeled "Synthetic" or "Full Synthetic" but are not. Mobil 1, Castrol Synthetic, Shell Rotella Synthetic and a number of others fall into this category.

Many of these are really good oils but they are actually just more highly refined petro oils that came out of the ground. Standard automotive oils mostly use class 1 base stock. These "synthetics" use class 2 and 3 base stocks which are more highly refined, ie have fewer impurities in them due to a more stringent refining process. Then the manufacturers add to these "synthetics" a very high quality additive package.

The result of this process yields an oil that performs close to the true synthetics at a much cheaper cost.
did not know this - thanks for writing up the above!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Just did the first oil change, it was easy. I used one of those oil filter wrench that look like a pair of pliers from auto Zone, I used Yamalube 10w50 Semi Synthetic, I went with 10w50 because hot in Mississippi. I would get a torque wrench, I had a rear flat and had to torque the rear axle bolt to 108 FT/LBS but I torque everything, they come in handy.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top