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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have about 400 more miles until I need to sync (or at least check to see if I need to sync) the throttle bodies. At first I was feeling a little intimidated about attempting this, but now after fiddling under the tank to get the ecu out I am more confident. Now, I know that like valve adjustments the procedure may or may not need to be done at every service interval. To the point; I would like to install extensions on the throttle body vacuum nipples to allow me to know with just a simple hookup of the manometer if I need to do the sync without removing the tank and airbox.

Has someone done this yet? I would like to know the size of the vacuum tubing I would need and what connectors to use.

Also, in some of the pics I have seen one of the adj screws looks a little difficult to get at. Is that one the control that you sync from? Or will I need a special tool to get at all the screws?
 

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Here is a thread on doing the throttle balance, http://www.fz09.org/forum/32-yamaha-fz-09-guides-how-s/1035-tank-removal-throttle-balance.html

As for keeping tubes on the ports, I wouldn't. With doing so you create a potential failure point in the intake system, and its much harder to plug a tube than it is to plug a hard port. I also wouldn't worry about checking the balance as often as the books says to, check it with the first service and then if your idle starts to change as time goes on then I'd check it. Maybe, if you're really concerned with it, go every other recommended interval and while you're in there just inspect everything. Just my $.02
 

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I forget which port is hard to get to (#1 think), but I left a 10" hose connected so it would be easier the next time. If you secure the hose end it shouldn't vibrate off the port.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Here is a thread on doing the throttle balance, http://www.fz09.org/forum/32-yamaha-fz-09-guides-how-s/1035-tank-removal-throttle-balance.html

As for keeping tubes on the ports, I wouldn't. With doing so you create a potential failure point in the intake system, and its much harder to plug a tube than it is to plug a hard port. I also wouldn't worry about checking the balance as often as the books says to, check it with the first service and then if your idle starts to change as time goes on then I'd check it. Maybe, if you're really concerned with it, go every other recommended interval and while you're in there just inspect everything. Just my $.02
The reason I thought extensions would be fine is that the fz6r comes from the factory with them. I would probably be using the oem fittings that went with the fz6r and cap those. As for the frequency of the inspection, I make sure all my t's are crossed and i's dotted when following a recommended maintenance schedule when the vehicle is still under warranty. That way there is no question to the upkeep history if it comes to warranty work. Also, it gives me a good set of historical data to go from to determine if the tedious items could skip an interval. After warranty, I will probably do as you say and go every other maintenance interval if the historical data shows no need for an every 4k check.

dblogs: what size tubing did you put on there? Inner/outer diameter?

Edit: I found the info in the link Kira put up. Thank you for that link.
 

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Your reasoning is totally understandable. I come from where you have to check everything, and I mean tear the whole thing down and inspect every aspect and adjust make adjustment that are within .0005", that being said you get a feel for when somethings amiss. Just for fun I did the sync on my throttles this past Friday and found them to be pulling within .0625" of each other. I couldn't tell the difference from being off to being perfectly sync'ed at all.
Tearing into the bike I've found with simple tools, such as a small 90 degree pick, duckbill pliers, needle nose pliers, and a flat blade screwdriver, you can get all the caps off the manifold in less than 60 seconds while leaving every hose and wire run in place. After realizing how much is actually needed to get into sync the throttles it seems like its pointless to put keep a hose attached to the port(s) because when doing the procedure you have to first sync your gauge and to do so you need to use the tubes that go to the ports off of a Tee. Check out page 4 and read from there to see what I'm talking about. A tip btw, leave the clamps on the caps, if you drop one you can use a telescopic magnet to reach in to the depths of the bike to retrieve it.
 

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If you are going to add extensions, I believe the size is either 4 or 5 mm (1/8-3/16).
You may want to use fuel hose rather than just vacuum line (if it fits) It will probably last longer, and you may not need hose clamps if you have a tight fit.

I had the 1250 bandit for 26K miles and I think it only needed a re-sync once after the initial sync I gave it. I would expect the FZ to behave similarly. It was on the original spark plugs too, which seemed to be fine. You do need to check them to see if they are eroding, but if not, put them back in.
 

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Modern spark plugs have an anti-seize coating from the factory. NGK recommends NOT inspecting or reinstalling, and there is really no good reason to inspect them..... Just another unnecessary practice carried on from the bad old days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Finally received my Carbtune in the mail and undertook this maintenance.

I opted out of adding extensions for a couple of reasons; I was concerned that my routing method would give inaccurate readings due to unequal lengths of hose and I am going to have to be back under there completely to change out the spark plugs next time anyway. I might revisit it at that time, however given the ease of breakdown and reassembly I don't think it will be necessary. Even getting to TB #1 was pretty easy.

Oddly, while most people I have read about have TB#1 as their control from the factory, I found mine to be TB#3 (right side). That said #1 and #2 were very slightly out of spec with each other (little more than 10 mmHg), but around 5 mmHg of the control. After syncing they are all within 1.5 - 3 mmHg of each other. I can't say I notice a crazy amount of difference, but I am glad to have been able to do this myself and not have to pay someone to do it for me.
 

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Really one of the only reasons I used to pull and inspect plugs in the "old days" was when I was making jetting changes with a new exhaust. A rare occurrence with todays modern electronics... plus back then there was no internet or forums to make setup comparisons easy. You had to talk to the guy at the shop who knew someone with the same bike, with the same exhaust, etc... much easier now!
 

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My FJ, and all the rest, had a port in each header tube, from the factory. Pull the screw and sniff each cyl individually. No need to read the plugs.... Yamaha was ahead of the rest back then.
I doubt the FJs were the only ones Yamaha did it with....
 

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Modern spark plugs have an anti-seize coating from the factory. NGK recommends NOT inspecting or reinstalling, and there is really no good reason to inspect them..... Just another unnecessary practice carried on from the bad old days.
That may be true, but my experience has been that there is no coating on any of the threads on a bike. They install them dry and then the aluminum corrodes with the steel and problems arise. When i checked the plugs on any new vehicle (bike or car) I find them to be loose. They torque them to the manufacturers specs which does not fully crush the special gasket, which is supposed to be self sealing, but the problem is that causes a poor ground for the plug, which has to pass that high voltage to ground.

The manual says to change plugs every 8K miles - that is insane, specially as the plugs are not that easy to get to. Some cars claim a plug change at 100K. So the only way to see how a plug is doing is to pull it and have a look. A close examination of the gap and the electrode and ground wire will tell you if the plug is eroding and either needs to be adjusted or changed. My sons Xb mk1 eats plugs in 30k. Standard plugs erode due to the high power igniters in that car, so we put iridiums in. We checked those after 40K and the center electrode is unworn, but the ground wire is eroding away, so I re-gapped them and put them back in. We will take one out at the next oil change to see how they are doing and re-plug if necessary.

On a honda accord site, a guy posted pictures of what happened to his cylinder head after a plug came loose on his car. It wasn't pretty and being it was a V6, he didn't really notice it. This thread link might work - Ticking / Slapping Noise Coming From Engine - 6th Gen Accord DIY and Performance Forums - I was already a proponent of tightening plugs down hard. This just reinforced that.
 
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