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Just got back from a great ride around the Low Country of South Carolina. You can't help notice all the junk on the side of the road. Tires, ladder pieces, smashed weed eaters and tools from landscaping trucks. So you can't help but think what you would do when that cart wheeling ladder comes at your FZ09. Also have gravel, dirt and sand trucks that you feel before you can see. I'm practicing swerving, braking skills daily but guess I would tuck behind my FZ09 if I could not dodge or swerve around that flying 2 by 4. What should a biker do in this situation?
 

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Swerve. Forget about the braking. Hopefully you know all about countersteering, cos if not then all the practice in the world won't help you.

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Dodge, duck, look for a hole (best option available), pray, ("Go directly to jail; do not pass go, do not collect $200")! I did find a 4X4 in the middle of a twisty that had no shoulder on either side in heavy traffic. I looked straight ahead, hit it straight on, landed in the facing traffic lane. Potential head on collision auto did brake hard for me and I managed to barely get back into my lane. Sometimes your lucky, sometimes your blessed, and sometimes it doesn't matter anymore. :color:
 

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Best advice I can give you is...NEVER FOLLOW A CAR OR A TRUCK CLOSE. Allow plenty of room for the unexpected to happen...because it will. Don't ever swerve OR BRAKE for a squirrel or a small dog. Just plow that little bastard straight on. You'd be surprised what you can run over with a motorcycle and NOT crash.
 
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This is where dirbike experience comes in very very handy. Especially high speed/nasty terrain dirtbike experience. Go watch the trials bike riders sometime and see the crazy shet that they ride over, on and thru.

I once jumped an abandoned washing machine on a trail while hauling ass, and landed it. almost crapped my pants but kept on riding.
 

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This is where dirbike experience comes in very very handy. Especially high speed/nasty terrain dirtbike experience. Go watch the trials bike riders sometime and see the crazy shet that they ride over, on and thru.
I'm not sure that's true, unless you're talking about hitting a patch of sand or gravel on the road. Road bikes and dirt bikes are totally different animals when it comes to steering or avoiding an obstacle.

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I'm not sure that's true, unless you're talking about hitting a patch of sand or gravel on the road. Road bikes and dirt bikes are totally different animals when it comes to steering or avoiding an obstacle.

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They are totally different when riding, but I disagree with you. Some of the skills we develop in the dirt come in handy once in a blue moon on the pavement and they can make the difference between nearly crashing and crashing.

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Swerve. Forget about the braking. Hopefully you know all about countersteering, cos if not then all the practice in the world won't help you.

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Well, if he is practicing swerving on a daily basis, he is countersteering. Swerving is countersteering. Thus. I'm not sure what you mean by "all the practice in the world won't help."
 

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I'm not sure that's true, unless you're talking about hitting a patch of sand or gravel on the road. Road bikes and dirt bikes are totally different animals when it comes to steering or avoiding an obstacle.

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I disagree. I have lofted my front wheel over obstacles, stood up and forward with the gas on solid with street bikes just like I have done with hundreds of logs across the trail.
 

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I'm not sure that's true, unless you're talking about hitting a patch of sand or gravel on the road. Road bikes and dirt bikes are totally different animals when it comes to steering or avoiding an obstacle.

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There are a lot of things you can learn in the dirt that translate to better street skills:
Throttle controlling traction is the first that comes to mind (that hasn't already been mentioned)
but there are many many more: alertness, reacting quickly instead of thinking about things, using your body more to absorb shocks and things like that, power sliding (flat tracking) ... just to name a few.
 
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There are lots of kinds and paces of dirt riding, in general compared to street riding you often have a very short time between seeing a hazard, condition, etc in front of you and having to do something about it. The time can be zero, you see it and deal with it immediately.

So dirt can help your reaction time, scanning, decision time, implementing what you decide to dp with the bike reflexively instead of trying to remember what was said in MSF a year ago etc. Yes practice swerving etc on your street bike. But it is hard even dangerous to fully mimic an emergency situation on a street bike because if you goof it up there's a real chance of going down.
 

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They both have two wheels, an engine, front and back brakes. Same thing. When you take cars out of the equation, street riding is easier.

Get on a dirtbike and go flying thru a trail and you are always dealing with giant rocks, boulders, trees, dips, traction issues and other riders. All split second reactions.
 

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There are lots of kinds and paces of dirt riding, in general compared to street riding you often have a very short time between seeing a hazard, condition, etc in front of you and having to do something about it. The time can be zero, you see it and deal with it immediately.


So dirt can help your reaction time, scanning, decision time, implementing what you decide to dp with the bike reflexively instead of trying to remember what was said in MSF a year ago etc. Yes practice swerving etc on your street bike. But it is hard even dangerous to fully mimic an emergency situation on a street bike because if you goof it up there's a real chance of going down.

If you ride on the trail with us, at our pace, your life will be threatened on a regular basis. Obstacles come up just as fast and frequently. I am so used to it that I barely waiver when confronted with a tough situation on the road. My heart rate does not spike.
 

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I know dirt riding has helped me on the street. These bikes we ride are just big, heavy dirt bikes when you get right down to it. You guys will liek my Motorcycle Drivers license requirements when I become President.

It will all be free. In fact, I'll pay you to attend the riders course. We'll fly everyone to utah and we will train on the Salt Flats. I'll have several dirt bikes to choose from....You'll progress from pw50..pw80..ttr125...yz250 and then on to the methanol burning Jawa speedway 500cc bike with 75 hp. No brakes. 185 lbs. 23 inch rear wheel.

I've ridden offroad since I was 5, and I'm 48 now. Dirt teaches you not to freak out when the bike slides. Also, it forces you to make split second decisions, btu typically is not so punishing of a mistake. Oh, and its so much fun you wont believe it. You dont need the latest and greatest, either. Any of the older Japanese bikes will do.

Its nice to ride and not have to worry about cars hitting you. I feel sorry for new riders. Its tough enough to avoid cars, much more so when you are worried abotu how to ride at the same time. Props to you guys! I'm glad I got the riding part dealt with before the street sense had to develop. Actually, that might be the biggest reason to ride offroad...
 
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