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Hey Vern,

You did the very best you could. You may well have saved a life. There's a new study on suicide among males that suggests that many attempts occur in a moment of despair, and, if you can just get the person through another hour to 24 hours, that moment passes.

Luckily, the guy wasn't carrying a gun; that would have ended his life very decisively and instantly. The fact that he opted for gas, near a public road, suggests he might subconsciously have been hoping for a good Samaritan to show up. You were that.

Best regards!
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Hey Vern,

You did the very best you could. You may well have saved a life. There's a new study on suicide among males that suggests that many attempts occur in a moment of despair, and, if you can just get the person through another hour to 24 hours, that moment passes.

Luckily, the guy wasn't carrying a gun; that would have ended his life very decisively and instantly. The fact that he opted for gas, near a public road, suggests he might subconsciously have been hoping for a good Samaritan to show up. You were that.

Best regards!
Thanks Chris......I sincerely hope that new study has some merit. It just seems so surreal to me.
 

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TT Sounds like it was meant to be. Following the feeling or desire to change your routine, then preventing a suicide shows that you have some good intuition. In my limited experience on motorcycles since earlier this year I've seen that motorcyclist intuition should never be ignored. Two of my friends went down on their bikes(both walked away one with a broken arm and several broken motorcycle parts and the other with no injuries except a broken engine cover) and they both had a "bad feeling" about that ride. You just had a feeling about changing your routine and it saved a life.
 

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Wow, well done. Thank God that He put you in the right place at the right time, and you were the right kind of man. Prayed for him and for you and your companions.

On a side note, I imagine that was a different ride home.
Yes it was for sure. When we pulled out of the pull off and on to the road to ride back, I caught myself picking up the pace as the tires started warming up. The problem was, my head was totally NOT in it and I blew a couple of corners on that road that is so familiar to me. I just automatically tried to ride the pace that I normally ride and it just wasn't working for me. My wife Peggy, who was riding on the back (we were on the ST1300), never says anything to me about the pace that I ride. She is totally confident in my riding skills and since she rides her own bike, she knows exactly what is going on. Well, that day, after I blew the second corner and ran pretty wide, she came on the intercom and ask me to slow down a bit. "Are you OK"? she said! "Yeah, but I just can't stop thinking about that guy and what he tried to do"! "I know, that's why you need to slow it down and bit and concentrate on the road and your riding"!

That brought me back to reality and even at a much slower pace, I just couldn't concentrate on what I was doing. The ride home was unlike any I've experienced....trying to concentrate and ride, fighting back tears, wonderment of where the young man was at right now......just nothing like I've experienced before.
 

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I'm not sure how or why I stumbled across this thread, and this is from 7 years ago, but I'm curious if you ever heard from that young man again? I'm sure you think of him often.

What you did that day was an amazing thing. As someone who struggles with bipolar disorder and has been at the end of the rope (no problems for almost 5 years now, no medication) a few more minutes or hours could be enough to change his mindset for life. Something about a complete stranger reaching out inspires hope, and I dont think that what happened that day was by chance.

This is what we need in the world more now than ever.
 

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I'm not sure how or why I stumbled across this thread, and this is from 7 years ago, but I'm curious if you ever heard from that young man again? I'm sure you think of him often.

What you did that day was an amazing thing. As someone who struggles with bipolar disorder and has been at the end of the rope (no problems for almost 5 years now, no medication) a few more minutes or hours could be enough to change his mindset for life. Something about a complete stranger reaching out inspires hope, and I dont think that what happened that day was by chance.

This is what we need in the world more now than ever.
Thank you for the kind words, I appreciate that. I guess I just did what any of us should do when you come across someone who needed help/intervention. I never did hear another thing about him, and I did try to find out, via a person I know that is in law enforcement in an adjacent county from where this took place. I do think about him occasionally and wonder if the story had a happy ending and he is doing OK now. Because I've never been in a situation where I was desperate enough to want to end my life, I simply cannot imagine the pain and desperation and feelings of helplessness that would cause someone to go that far. All I knew at the time was that I must try to stop it, if it was humanly possible....and I did....at least for the moment. I pray that he did get help...but most likely I will never really know.
 

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I haven't seen this thread before. My partner and I stopped a jumper while on patrol one night. We weren't exactly gentle and try to talk him down. My partner distracted him and I grabbed him in a choke hold, dragged him off the parapet and dumped him on the ground. Then held him until police arrived. We didn't normally handle suicides and stuff.
It did the trick. But I did think later what could have happened if he jumped as I grabbed him
 
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