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The riser nuts shouldn't be loctited, but they do use locking-style nuts. Spray some pentrating lubricant on the threads, should make em come out easier.
Mmmmm…🤔

No nuts involved in this situation, just tapped holes in the bottom half of the aluminum risers. The OP is having issues with the four screws that hold the handlebar to the risers, not the risers themselves…
 

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Mmmmm…🤔

No nuts involved in this situation, just tapped holes in the bottom half of the aluminum risers. The OP is having issues with the four screws that hold the handlebar to the risers, not the risers themselves…
Yeah, you're right on that. But I was replying to rulejunior who was having problems turning the risers around because he couldn't get the nuts loose.
 

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Bought a brand-new Jawa 175 two-stroke single street bike in 1974 for around $400. Great bike! Had a gear shifter that turned into the kick-starter when you pushed inward on the shaft with your left heel and the shifter swung up and turned into the left-side kick starter. Then when it started, it would swing back down to horizontal and pop back out into shift position. Clever!
Also had a yoke mechanism on the shifter that pulled the clutch shaft in with a cable, so you could actually push the shifter down into first gear at a light without using the clutch lever and then carefully and slowly release the shifter and it acted like a foot clutch in a car. Very handy when carrying stuff with your left arm, like a 9'6" big surfboard in Santa Cruz on a windy day. Stupid. Before leashes, No leash is pretty stupid too. Sort a poor-man's quick shifter in 1974. But better in some respects.
Also had fabulous toolkit with reversible screwdriver with small and large straight slot ends that fit perfectly into precise deep square cut channels in the screw ends so they fit perfectly with no cam-out at all and the screwdriver handle pivot was super-strong and could be used at 90 degrees for tons of torque. I loved the bike. Shoulda kept it, (like many of the other bikes I've owned)
As far as removing tight screws, a vessel-type impact driver is frequently the ticket. I've had best success pre-loading the driver bit with my left hand (by pushing and twisting counterclockwise) prior to and while hitting with a hammer. Alternating heat and cold if necessary and penetrating oil.
Some have had success simply by smacking the head of the bolt downward with a hammer prior to loosening it. But I would hit it very hard, might bend something.
Be careful using a vessel-type impact driver. They are adjustable for tightening as well as loosening. If you try to use it while in the tightening position, guess what will happen? You'll just make things even tighter. It usually comes out of the box in the loosening position, but just in case, To ensure it's in the loosening mode, grab the handle with one hand and the driver end with the other and twist. Twisting counterclockwise puts it into the loosening mode, twisting clockwise puts it into tightening mode. It takes a bit of force. I think it has to overcome a spring-loaded cam inside. You'll certainly feel it if you're twisting hard enough to make it happen. It's a big, obvious movement that you absolutely can't mistake. It doesn't just move - it changes positions a lot. Go back and forth a few times until you get the hang of it. So I remember which way is which by telling myself "Unscrew to unscrew".
Everyone should own one of these and several bits. Go buy one right now, Or ask Santa Claus.
There was no way to work on an early to mid- 60's Honda without one without wrecking nearly every stupid phillips garbage-metal screw head.
Also, When using a ratchet wrench make yourself a Tee handle with a (big) ratchet wrench with pipe over the handle and steel rod (maybe long socket extension but you might bend it) shoved into the pipe making a big Tee handle so the bit won't 'cam-out" when you twist it. Usually works like a charm. Actually, much better than a charm, which usually don't work at all, while a Tee handle usually works surprisingly easily and well.
Good luck!
Sorry it this posted twice.
 

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There was no way to work on an early to mid- 60's Honda without one without wrecking nearly every stupid phillips garbage-metal screw head.
That's because they weren't stupid Phillips garbage-metal screw heads, they were JIS screw heads (still are). Different animal. Took me too long to figure that out.
 
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