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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
While giving the bike a thorough once-over, I noticed some play in the rear suspension linkage where the dogbone link bolts to the aluminum shock linkage. When I rock the bike on the sidestand, taking the weight off the rear wheel, it wiggles and clunks. Would someone mind checking theirs to see if it's the same? The bike currently has 3300 miles on it. Before I start messing with suspension mods, I want to be sure there isn't a warranty issue that may need to be handled.

Thanks!

** update ** after checking several 09's, it appears to be normal amount of play.

 

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Dude, get that checked out.. You may just need to get it torqued down. But I would avoid riding like. Is the nut loose?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nut is tight. Went riding with Dan this morning, and I checked his before we took off. His seemed to have some play in it too, but I figured I'd throw the question out to the forum.
 

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Tight it up. Look like the bolt is loose. That's the clearance play between the bolt/bushing.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Fasteners are all tight. Checking more on the interwebz turns up plenty of talk about Yamaha street bikes and suspension linkage free play.
 

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The tightness of the nut has nothing to do with what is shown in that video. The inner bushing and the bolt have excess clearance and it's bad considering the low mileage. I don't know if they built it with no grease...or the tolerances were the shits.....but either way it's Yamahas fault and that should be fixed correctly under warranty.
 

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Thats pretty common with suspension linkages. Think of all the leverage at play by the time it translates to the rear wheel. 1/2mm play at the linkage translates to several mm at the rear wheel.

You can make it better by loosening everythign associated with the linkage. Shock, too, if accessible. Find a way to run a tie-down around the rear of the bike and compress the suspension. Or, have someone heavy sit on the bike..with the pieces loose. As the weight/pressure is on the rear-end, tighten everything up to the specified range. This will usually, magically, make it disappear.

Most bikes have this, but people don't notice. Also, as the bike get solder, corrosion takes place in the bearings and tightens thing sup again. You are still under warranty, so get it checked out, but I'll bet its nothing.
 

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Thats pretty common with suspension linkages. Think of all the leverage at play by the time it translates to the rear wheel. 1/2mm play at the linkage translates to several mm at the rear wheel.

You can make it better by loosening everythign associated with the linkage. Shock, too, if accessible. Find a way to run a tie-down around the rear of the bike and compress the suspension. Or, have someone heavy sit on the bike..with the pieces loose. As the weight/pressure is on the rear-end, tighten everything up to the specified range. This will usually, magically, make it disappear.

Most bikes have this, but people don't notice. Also, as the bike get solder, corrosion takes place in the bearings and tightens thing sup again. You are still under warranty, so get it checked out, but I'll bet its nothing.
None of what you said is true.
 

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I've seen this, as well. There is a small amount of clearance between the bearing and the bushing. Tightening that bolt (further) won't help. To a certain extent, this slop is normal for a suspension linkage. Given the lever ratio (about 2.38:1), the clearance is amplified by the time it you see it at the rear wheel. I haven't had enough bikes come through here yet on account of winter to determine if the bike here was representative or an anomaly.

I'm planning to disassemble the rear suspension and swingarm again (rearsets and some shock work), and was planning to take that suspension link apart. I know an ex-bearing engineer I was going to reach out to and get his feel on acceptable clearances. In general, bearings need a press fit (interference) on one diameter and a slip (or transition) fit on the other. Two press fits can result in reduced bearing life and/or failure...
 

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Stoltec is right on the money. Coincidence, or not, Yamaha dirt bikes were famous for this play. Not so much when brand new as the rubber seals on the joints tended to keep some tension in there.

But, tightening the linkage, shock, ans swingarm pivot, while under a load (guy sitting on seat) made it much better. Probably more of a band-aid than real fix, but it did work. Plus, whats the use of replacing a bearing, or bushing, if it just breaks in again?
 

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Not sure why the video is gone, but I have the same problem. I just spent 45 minutes, mostly on hold, for a Yamaha USA Customer Relations person to get me int touch with a Product Specialist, who put me on hold to speak with a Technician, so they could inform me that slop in a new needle bearing is normal. That is a load of shite. ;(
 

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I respect your opinion, Nick, but I feel like the amount of play I have in this needle bearing, giving the the bike is practically new, is excessive. It also seems like it would not help handling/traction, especially when the suspension is at or near top out. Just because it's common, doesn't make it right.
 

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My view is if it's not making noise, cracking, popping, grinding or spitting bearings out the side.. it's fine.

And all this worry is like barking up a tree with no critters in it.

But then again, what do I know, I only have dealt with bearings in farm equipment for decades... The needle bearings used by Yamaha tend to be installed with a very minimal amount of lube, so you could take it all apart, get some good marine grade grease worked in there, and it's going to hold up better over time than the stock waxy stuff they use.

I like marine rated grease as it's going to stand up to being washed out better than standard grease, but anything with moly is a good choice too. (The moly bonds to the metal, and reduces friction and corrosion etc.)

If you really are worried, make the dealer replace it. A bearing failure at the swing arm/shock would be a lawsuit in nearly all cases.
 
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