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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello guys!!

I am eager to get your feedback in a small issue I have been having.
This isn't a "problem" per se, yet I want to jump on it before it grows.

Stoltec Moto does the ECU flashings (see Got ECU? We do...).
My FZ-09's ECU will be sent to him, asap.

Yet, now that he will have it over there, I would like to make a small modification.

My bike gets way too hot, way too often!
I live in sunny, Caribbean Puerto Rico... and it gets hot as heck over here (and we are in January!! So imagine mid-summer!!)
Check this graph out so you get an idea.
And it's useful to state, that this is year round.
No snow... no "cold" weather... ever. Ever. Never.

Ok, so my bike, I regularly see the temps climb up to 225F (107C) in traffic (moving super slow, or standing at a red-light).
This is regular.
I have seen spikes of 227F.

I was speaking with Nick from Stoltec Moto, and he tells me the map he has for the ECU turns the radiator fan ON at 205F (96C) and turns it OFF at 195F (90.5C).

That piece of information surprised me a LOT, because I ONLY hear the fan turn ON when the temp's display hits 217F (103C).
I know 217 is an odd number, yet that's the best I have been able to pin it down... 217F.
I also know there is a delay between the temp hitting the sensor, and the engine block's temp, and the head's temp, and the rad temp, and etc etc.

Anyway, I want to make the radiator fan turn ON sooner.
Before I spoke with Nick, I thought to turn it on at 200F, and turn it off at 190F.
Yet, after Nick's information that the fan turns ON at 205F, and off at 195F... I'm kinda of at a loss.

What temperature should I make it kick in?

I know it's a new bike... and I know Yamaha has many engineers working on all of these systems... yet I don't like the 225F one bit.
And it happens way too regularly for me to be comfortable with.


Any insights you guys might provide?
What temperatures would you choose for ON and OFF?

Thank you!!
 

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On my old bike I wired in a switch to override the thermostat to kick on the fan when I was in traffic in summertime...that way you have absolute control. It's an easy mod, you should check it out, just need to find a spot to install a small panel mount switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey man... very good idea.
I thought something like that... shouldn't be that hard.

Yet if we can reach a consensus here, and Nick and re-program it with the lower temperature, that would be even more awesome.
Then I don't have relays and switches.

But yeah... shouldn't be that hard!
 

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No relays needed...get a switch like this: 5 Pieces 2 Position SPDT Locking Actuator Panel Mount Toggle Switch - Amazon.com
RadioShack or another electronics or auto parts store will have them.

Find the leads that come off your fan, find the positive lead (prob not black)...and splice into it with a new wire, and put the switch in line with the new wire that is tied back to a source that is switched with the ignition, ideally right back to the fuse block connection with the fan, which bypasses the thermostat.

This way, either the thermostat or your new switch will activate the fan
 

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the radiator fan is controlled by the ecu via a relay, so the way i'd do it is to splice a switch across the switched (high current) side of the relay.

according to the wiring schematic, the two wires to tap into are the light blue and red/light blue. the relay is under the seat - so you can conveniently mount your switch to the side of the battery box within easy reach. when your switch is on, the fan goes on. when the switch is off, the fan goes on when the ecu tells it to.

the radiator fan circuit is rated for 15 amps, so make sure the wires and switch you use can handle that amount of current.
 

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Woah guys...it knows when it's hot, and acts accordingly. I had it super low on coolant and it still stayed cool enough. I can understand a preference to keep it cooler, but it's not hurting anything. It's not going to go overheat unless you have bigger issues than the fan turning on. If it can't cool it down from 217( which is the same number I've found) it sure won't cool it down from a hotter temp. It's easier to loose heat if you have more, than if you have less. They probably have it set at that temp to avoid killing the fan, which will be on a lot more if you use a switch all the time or have it on at a cooler temp, making it fail a lot quicker.

The fan is the first point of failure and not the engine. If I had a choice I would keep it the same as what it is since it took a lot of smart Japanese engineers to come up with these parameters. 217 is obviously the best temp since it's so specific...and not even rounded lol.

Just my 2c
 

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I think it's more of a comfort thing for the rider sitting in traffic in the tropics with the bike pouring heat on your legs. If you know you are going to be sitting for a few minutes, it's nice to get a jump on the inevitable heat rise. Or the op could pipe that extra heat up here to the NE...I'll take it
 

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I think it's more of a comfort thing for the rider sitting in traffic in the tropics with the bike pouring heat on your legs. If you know you are going to be sitting for a few minutes, it's nice to get a jump on the inevitable heat rise. Or the op could pipe that extra heat up here to the NE...I'll take it
I get that, but it's like buying a naked bike and wishing it had wind protection. I take my car if I want climate control. But I digress, I'm almost breaking my forum golden rule. Mod and let mod. :)
 

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Woah guys...it knows when it's hot, and acts accordingly. I had it super low on coolant and it still stayed cool enough. I can understand a preference to keep it cooler, but it's not hurting anything. It's not going to go overheat unless you have bigger issues than the fan turning on. If it can't cool it down from 217( which is the same number I've found) it sure won't cool it down from a hotter temp. It's easier to loose heat if you have more, than if you have less. They probably have it set at that temp to avoid killing the fan, which will be on a lot more if you use a switch all the time or have it on at a cooler temp, making it fail a lot quicker.

The fan is the first point of failure and not the engine. If I had a choice I would keep it the same as what it is since it took a lot of smart Japanese engineers to come up with these parameters. 217 is obviously the best temp since it's so specific...and not even rounded lol.

Just my 2c
^This

I wouldn't mess with it.
 

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Where I live it is often 110+ degrees in the summer with many days over 100 degrees. Yes, I do ride at 100 degrees but prefer it be around 90 max. I often start on rides around 75 at 6am and end up coming home by noon when it's usually already 95-100. So I will hear the fan come on many times during riding on these days. I have heard the fans on all my water cooled bikes. On my Harleys, heat was a worry. I had extra oil cooler added and oil ran about 205 in the holding tank. I would like to see the temp maybe max out around 210 or so. I have already seen 223 for short spurts. I will be putting a small led that will show me when the fan is on. I will also put a switch to turn it on when I want it on so I get a head start at cooling on the hot days when I know I will get into traffic. Yamaha may have engineered the bike but so have all the other bikes I have owned been engineered and all of them have run hotter than I like. I expect to have heat problems with this bike. I plan to solve them if I want to be able to ride without heat worries which are real to me and not simply being paranoid (well, not any worse than someone dialing in the suspension anyway) , IMHO (my disclaimer).
 

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Dont mess with it. You can't change one of an engine's parameters without changing others to compensate for it. More things are tuned to the engine's operating temperature than what you are realizing.

The fan doesn't turn on until 217°F because modern engines are designed to run optimally between 215°F and 220°F. You want it to get this hot in order to boil out water vapor from your oil (your crankcase breather tube takes air and moisture in every time the engine cools). The optimal operating temperature used to be 165°F to 180°F because of limitations from the coolant - but coolant and oil are both fine now up to 270°F. Running your engine above the boiling point of water will keep your oil from suffering from water contamination longer and lubricating better. Better coolant and a higher operating temperature is why many manufacturers have increased the time between recommended oil changes.

If you were to change your engine's operating temperature - then you should also change your spark plug's temperature, and change your fueling to compensate. Otherwise you'll be running with a slightly hot plug and running slightly leaner. Granted it would only be slightly, but it would not be good (especially because the fueling is already on the lean side).

There are too many things that are tuned to the same operating temperature for me to list them all. Your cylinders are a specific thickness, the gap between the pistons and the cylinders, and the rings - are all designed to seal best at specific temperatures. The clutch plates, the cam chain, the oil pump, the oil filter - all need the oil to be hot enough that the oil's viscosity is low enough to flow easily...

Your bike's engine likes the heat more than you do. And especially in a humid area you want to ensure it gets hot enough to boil the moisture out of the oil quickly.
 

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dont mess with it. You can't change one of an engine's parameters without changing others to compensate for it. More things are tuned to the engine's operating temperature than what you are realizing.

The fan doesn't turn on until 217°f because modern engines are designed to run optimally between 215°f and 220°f. You want it to get this hot in order to boil out water vapor from your oil (your crankcase breather tube takes air and moisture in every time the engine cools). The optimal operating temperature used to be 165°f to 180°f because of limitations from the coolant - but coolant and oil are both fine now up to 270°f. Running your engine above the boiling point of water will keep your oil from suffering from water contamination longer and lubricating better. Better coolant and a higher operating temperature is why many manufacturers have increased the time between recommended oil changes.

If you were to change your engine's operating temperature - then you should also change your spark plug's temperature, and change your fueling to compensate. Otherwise you'll be running with a slightly hot plug and running slightly leaner. Granted it would only be slightly, but it would not be good (especially because the fueling is already on the lean side).

There are too many things that are tuned to the same operating temperature for me to list them all. Your cylinders are a specific thickness, the gap between the pistons and the cylinders, and the rings - are all designed to seal best at specific temperatures. The clutch plates, the cam chain, the oil pump, the oil filter - all need the oil to be hot enough that the oil's viscosity is low enough to flow easily...

Your bike's engine likes the heat more than you do. And especially in a humid area you want to ensure it gets hot enough to boil the moisture out of the oil quickly.
so to dry cloths it has to be 220 ????????????
 

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so to dry cloths it has to be 220 ????????????[/QUOTE

If you put a wet cloth into your crankcase, then yes. Removing water from another liquid such as oil is very different from removing water from a solid. Clothes dryers work by evaporating the water rather than boiling it. Water suspended in oil is protected from evaporation.
 

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so to dry cloths it has to be 220 ????????????
You don't boil your clothes when you dry them...but then again I'm not from Canada ;-). I'm pretty sure the two things are unrelated.

JWTR
i didn't know a lot of that, but it
Makes sense to me!




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Lol, further, you live in San Diego...your opinions about adverse weather are invalid :)
Well I did learn to ride in Mississippi during the spring and summer which is AKA hell for heat and humidity.

I am originally from Montana and spent 3 years of my life in Virginia.

This is the first winter where I will enjoy an area that has little to no bad weather.

Your point is still kinda valid though.

FYI my official job title is navy weather forecaster. :)


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Well I did learn to ride in Mississippi during the spring and summer which is AKA hell for heat and humidity.

I am originally from Montana and spent 3 years of my life in Virginia.

This is the first winter where I will enjoy an area that has little to no bad weather.

Your point is still kinda valid though.

FYI my official job title is navy weather forecaster. :)


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Touche
 

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SO HOW WILL A 4 STROKE SNOWMOBILE SURVIVE ? THEY SHUR DON'T RUN HOT . AND IF YOU GET WATER IN YOUR OIL IT WILL LOOK LIKE COFFEE WITH CREAM .
Elephant Racing | Tech Topic | Oil Temperature and Engine Life

The heat is on: Our experts agree on the best oil temperature
You cannot successfully support your argument by posting links to articles about other types of vehicles. We're not discussing snowmobiles, cars, or aircrafts. All caps doesn't make what your saying relevant either.

"Motrocycles: Fundamentals, Service, Repair", by Bruce A. Johns, David D. Edmundson, and Robert Scharff, ISBN 1-56637-4790. Chapter 10: Lubrication Systems, page 239:

"Normal maximum engine oil temperature is considered to be 250ºF (121ºC)."

*that number is based on Mineral/Dino oil, not Synthetic.
 

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Btw, sfortuna isn't shouting, his comp at work is set to caps...when he is posting all caps you know he is slacking off at work! I think he owns the business though??
 
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