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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The "end" to riding season is right around the corner for most of us Northeastern guys. Myself not included....

Which brings me to the following question. Which tire to get... (Thread title shows one of the 2 paths I plan to take).

While I know the powers are warm weather oriented, I don't plan on dragging knee around corners in the middle of winter. I love taking corners as quick as I can, and I don't want to sacrifice that because of tires. (When riding in the cold, I usually make sure the sun is out so the roads are as "warm" as possible).

I don't ride ALL winter, but I ride when I can. If I had to guess, I will probably put less than 1000 miles on the bike between now and spring.

I do plan on taking this bike to the track sometime in spring, and first day pending, I may have more track days to follow.

Basically all I'm asking for are other people's thoughts/opinions about using the power 3s as a "winter" tire. Is it really going to be that much different whether I'm putting around on those VS the road 4s?

I already have 4k+ miles on the stock Dunlop's, so they will not make it. I just don't want to get the road 4s, and regret it by being limited (vs power 3s) when the warm weather comes around...
 

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I'm not sure why you think the P.P. IIIs are warm weather friendly and not so much for cooler weather....it's just not true. When using them in the cooler months, just drop your front and rear tire pressure so that the tire flexes more and heats up enough to stick well. For your intended purpose of use, and if you are more concerned with stickability vs. higher mileage from a tire, there's no doubt you should use the P.P. IIIs.
 
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i just got PP3s put on last week and can't say enough good things about them. It's been in the low 50s commuting to work in the morning (obviously not cold but not high 80s like it was this summer) and i've had no issues with traction. I plan to ride these until the salt hits the road.
 

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PR4s are good enough for entry level track days and the most aggressive of street riding. I would only say go to the PP3s if you operate on the track at an intermediate or above pace.
 

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PR4s are good enough for entry level track days and the most aggressive of street riding. I would only say go to the PP3s if you operate on the track at an intermediate or above pace.
I don't agree with what you said regarding "the most aggressive of street riding" or "entry level of track riding". I can pretty easily out ride them on the street and we had several Novice riders this past Sunday at Barber that would have been in deep trouble with PR 4s at the pace they were riding.
 
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I don't agree with what you said regarding "the most aggressive of street riding" or "entry level of track riding". I can pretty easily out ride them on the street and we had several Novice riders this past Sunday at Barber that would have been in deep trouble with PR 4s at the pace they were riding.
Can you elaborate on what you mean would have been in 'deep trouble'? I am curious as a prospective track day rider that doesn't want to be in any kind of trouble.

Do you mean that even the novice track class was going faster than the PR 4's would allow?
 

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i just got PP3s put on last week and can't say enough good things about them. It's been in the low 50s commuting to work in the morning (obviously not cold but not high 80s like it was this summer) and i've had no issues with traction. I plan to ride these until the salt hits the road.
Took my PP3's out to the track and had fun walking them out of a few corners.

Communication is MUCH better than the OEM tires but I feel like they could be a bit stickier. Might try the Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa next year.
 

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Can you elaborate on what you mean would have been in 'deep trouble'? I am curious as a prospective track day rider that doesn't want to be in any kind of trouble.

Do you mean that even the novice track class was going faster than the PR 4's would allow?
A big part of track days involve having confidence in your tires to "stick"when lean angles start getting more and more. And, usually at the Novice level and sometimes even into the intermediate level,a rider doesn't have enough experience to know what to do and how to react when a tire starts either pushing on the front end or sliding out on the rear. What I was referencing in my statement is that at the pace they were running, I feel that the PRs would have been sliding around and they probably don't have enough experience to know how to react to and handle that situation without possibly crashing. I'm NOT saying the PRs are not a great tire, but like anything else in terms of riding, there's a time and a place for everything and my feelings are that there are probably some Novice riders that need more tire than a PR. And I'll say that there are a lot of intermediate riders that would out ride the PR. Given the choice, and we all have that choice, go for a stickier tire than you K N O W you will need for your riding skill level. Tires are ALWAYS cheaper to replace than going down and causing injury and/or bike damage.

Having said all of that, any higher level advanced rider or professional rider could use a set of PRs and probably out ride anyone other than another equal rider....but that is because they know exactly how to deal with pretty much whatever the tire does and they "listen" to what the tire is telling them...a.k.a. feedback from the tire

I watched Jason DiSalvo a few weeks ago come past me into Turn 5 at Barber, purposely sliding the rear of the bike sideways towards the apex of the turn....at probably 50 MPH faster than I was going...rear wheel sliding or backing it in....and that was on some of the best tires that money can buy.

And BTW....I'm not saying the entire Novice group was going that fast to be able to out ride a set of PRs, but there were some..thus my disagreement with Weapon's statement. I have no idea of the original poster's skill level, so he may or may not be able to out ride a set.
 

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From personal experience, the PR4's warm up quicker than the 3's. In fact, they are sticky instantly, turn in quicker, and last longer. I cannot outride them, but I am not as fast as I used to be. I have left a black strip out of the turns with them.
 

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A big part of track days involve having confidence in your tires to "stick"when lean angles start getting more and more. And, usually at the Novice level and sometimes even into the intermediate level,a rider doesn't have enough experience to know what to do and how to react when a tire starts either pushing on the front end or sliding out on the rear. What I was referencing in my statement is that at the pace they were running, I feel that the PRs would have been sliding around and they probably don't have enough experience to know how to react to and handle that situation without possibly crashing. I'm NOT saying the PRs are not a great tire, but like anything else in terms of riding, there's a time and a place for everything and my feelings are that there are probably some Novice riders that need more tire than a PR. And I'll say that there are a lot of intermediate riders that would out ride the PR. Given the choice, and we all have that choice, go for a stickier tire than you K N O W you will need for your riding skill level. Tires are ALWAYS cheaper to replace than going down and causing injury and/or bike damage.

Having said all of that, any higher level advanced rider or professional rider could use a set of PRs and probably out ride anyone other than another equal rider....but that is because they know exactly how to deal with pretty much whatever the tire does and they "listen" to what the tire is telling them...a.k.a. feedback from the tire

I watched Jason DiSalvo a few weeks ago come past me into Turn 5 at Barber, purposely sliding the rear of the bike sideways towards the apex of the turn....at probably 50 MPH faster than I was going...rear wheel strong or backing it in....and that was on some of the best tires that money can buy.

And BTW....I'm not saying the entire Novice group was going that fast to be able to out ride a set of PRs, but there were some..thus my disagreement with Weapon's statement. I have no idea of the original poster's skill level, so he may or may not be able to out ride a set.
Thanks, the clarification is very much appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow guys, thanks for the feed back! It is very much appreciated!

No specific reason as to why I thoughts the powers are more summer oriented. Just figured the compounds would get harder, faster in 20-40 degree temps. Like I said though, I don't plan on flying around any turns in the middle of winter anyway...

Guess it's the power 3s for this guy!
 

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From personal experience, the PR4's warm up quicker than the 3's. In fact, they are sticky instantly, turn in quicker, and last longer. I cannot outride them, but I am not as fast as I used to be. I have left a black strip out of the turns with them.
And that can be a big problem sometimes. The tires are made to heat up quickly, but when pushed hard, they get greasy and will start sliding around.
 

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Im trying to decide between the pp3's and the pr4's. This is a bit of an older thread but would like some help deciding. i ride kind hard on the twisties but casual as well. I need ok tires for riding in the rain casue that happens every once in a while. I dont like the pr4 cause of how ugly they are -1 and ive read they slide around if you can get them hot enough :( -1 but warm up quick +1 and last a long time +1. the pp3 i read take a minute to warm up -1, dont fair as well when it gets colder (i ride after 40°F and up but have a better lean angle +1 but they dont last as long as the pr4 -1.
 

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I have the Pilot Road 4's, run 36F 42R, quick in the twisties and B+ on the track. That performance that lasts over 10k miles? Yes, please.

Edit: Almost forgot about them being among the best rain tires available. It's a no brainer for me.
 
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I dont like the pr4 cause of how ugly they are .
If you go fast enough, people can't see the tread pattern. They won't see them in the wet either, because they'll have binned it trying to keep up.
 

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If you go fast enough, people can't see the tread pattern. They won't see them in the wet either, because they'll have binned it trying to keep up.
Lou! That's really funny. I love my PR4's.
 

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I have run several different tires on my FZ.

Have to say that the PP3's are my hands down favorites.

Others include PR 2, 3, and 4. And of course the stock Bridgestones.

I tried a set of PR4's and yes they do last a long time, double mileage of the PP3 but that longivity comes with a price.

The PR4 on the rear always felt greasy during upright acceleration. That hard compound in the center made it pretty easy to spin up under a quick handful of throttle. I like to wheelie the bike in 1st and 2nd gear and blipping the throttle to lift the front end would result in spinning the rear tire about half of the time. This never happened with the PP3.

Also it was real easy to lock up under braking.

If you don't mind changing tires a little more often I would go with the PP3's.
 

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What kind of road surfaces do you ride on Hawkerjet? I've never had PR4's spin up in the dry even being hard on the throttle. Our roads are mostly chip seal and asphalt, good traction when they're fresh.
 
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