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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
They're HERE!

As most of you have already surmised from several other miscellaneous threads on the forum, the full lineup of Penske shocks is now ready for order. Here's how this runs down:

8900E

  • Entry-level emulsion shock for those on a budget. Think of this as a REALLY good stock shock. Compares nicely to a stock remote reservoir shock on most modern sportbikes. Although I don't typically sell emulsion shocks due to the inherent performance benefits of a floating piston separated shock, this shock is SO much better than the stock shock, it makes sense for those who can't afford to higher-spec shock.
  • Single damping adjustable - one knob controls both low-speed compression and rebound (stiffening one stiffens the other).
  • Spring preload adjustment
  • Ride height adjustment
  • Torrington thrust bearing to limit spring binding under compression and ease preload adjustment
  • Upgradeable to remote reservoir 8983 or 8987
  • About 1 lb lighter than stock
  • MSRP: $650

8983 'Double Clicker'

  • This is Penske's most popular motorcycle shock. Double adjustable gives separate adjustment of both low speed compression and rebound.
  • Remote reservoir
  • Fully adjustable swivel banjo bolts make installation easy and allows for the hose assembly to flex with the suspension action
  • 25 clicks of low speed compression adjustment (adjustable without dismounting bike)
  • ~30 clicks of rebound adjustment
  • Spring preload adjustment
  • Ride height adjustment
  • Torrington thrust bearing to limit spring binding under compression and ease preload adjustment
  • Upgradeable to 8987
  • About 0.5 lb lighter than stock
  • MSRP: $975

8987 'Triple Clicker'

  • This is Penske's top of the line motorcycle shock that is a perennial favorite amongst racers, track day junkies, ADV'ers, and aggressive street riders.
  • Remote reservoir
  • Fully adjustable swivel banjo bolts make installation easy and allows for the hose assembly to flex with the suspension action.
  • 25 clicks of low speed compression adjustment (squat tuning), adjustable without dismounting bike.
  • ~15 clicks of high speed compression adjustment (race speak: curb tuning; street speak: bump compliance)
  • ~30 clicks of rebound adjustment.
  • Spring preload adjustment
  • Ride height adjustment
  • Torrington thrust bearing to limit spring binding under compression and ease preload adjustment
  • About 0.5 lb lighter than stock.
  • MSRP: $1275





For those who aren't familiar with Penske, they are located in Reading, Pennsylvania and supply shocks to various forms of motorsports including, but not limited to, F1, AMA, NHRA, NASCAR, etc. Their shocks are fully designed, tested, and built in the USA and are fully rebuildable. It only takes one shock to convert riders into lifelong customers. All shocks are spec'd for each customer and do not sit on the shelf; they are built as-ordered and typically ship in 3-4 weeks depending on the time of year. But for more information, feel free to check out Penske Shocks. I'd tell you to check our site...but...well, not yet. Who knows when (I've been saying this for years and never seem to get around to it). You're going to have to talk to me one way or another...sorry!

Per our dealer agreement with Penske, we are only allowed to publicly advertise MSRP. We sell for lower, so please PM me or email [email protected]. Please do not post prices received from us on the forum - this only ruins the fun for everyone!

See here for a helpful installation kit: http://www.yamahafz09.com/forum/31-stoltec-moto/796-foot-peg-pivot-kits-stock.html#post11628
 

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This is awesome... I am picking up my bike in the next week. How hard is it to swap out the shock? Do you think it would be fine if I was to just do the shock first and the fork Springs later? I have never messed with forks and I would need someone else to do that.

I know I need both with my 6'6" height and weight at 230-235 in full gear.

Suspension is my first investment I want to add.

Thank you for all your hard work and for sharing it with us.
 

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Step right up boys and girls. Nick has made it easy for us by doing the testing and setup. I have ordered the 8983 Double clicker as well as stiffer fork springs. I plan on starting with 10W Maxima Racing Fork Fluid with the stiffer springs to find a front to rear balance that I can live with until development of other fork options has time to catch up. The only ting that Nick did not mention about the 8983 is that in it's location the Compression dial is easily accessible by the rider in a seated position. This is great from when I go from straight tract to twisties. Just give it two clicks and hammer down.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This is awesome... I am picking up my bike in the next week. How hard is it to swap out the shock? Do you think it would be fine if I was to just do the shock first and the fork Springs later? I have never messed with forks and I would need someone else to do that.

I know I need both with my 6'6" height and weight at 230-235 in full gear.

Suspension is my first investment I want to add.

Thank you for all your hard work and for sharing it with us.
Shock swap is pretty straight forward. It really makes it easier if you raise the tank (do not need to completely remove). For first timers, plan on a solid 60-90 minutes.

Step right up boys and girls. Nick has made it easy for us by doing the testing and setup. I have ordered the 8983 Double clicker as well as stiffer fork springs. I plan on starting with 10W Maxima Racing Fork Fluid with the stiffer springs to find a front to rear balance that I can live with until development of other fork options has time to catch up. The only ting that Nick did not mention about the 8983 is that in it's location the Compression dial is easily accessible by the rider in a seated position. This is great from when I go from straight tract to twisties. Just give it two clicks and hammer down.
I knew I was forgetting something! The same goes the 8987...
 

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how dose the top of the line shock work out for us that will change the loading from one up to two up with bags ?. i would set mine up as a sport touring like my fz6r was .
i had a hyperpro on that bike . but kicked myself for not getting the hydraulic preload adjuster
 

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Discussion Starter #6
how dose the top of the line shock work out for us that will change the loading from one up to two up with bags ?. i would set mine up as a sport touring like my fz6r was .
i had a hyperpro on that bike . but kicked myself for not getting the hydraulic preload adjuster
In all honestly, any of the three shocks will work in that regard. The spring preload is adjustable via the perch, so method is the same from one to another. Damping wise, they can all be adjusted to accommodate varying loads. Naturally, the number of adjustments will vary with the shock model. It goes without saying that the top of the line shock has more adjustment to fine tune. I always tell customers the same thing: if you aren't going to make the adjustment, there is no sense in optioning up a shock that gives more adjustability. However, if you actually use the adjustments and learn/understand their impact, you'll never want a less adjustable shock.
 

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In all honestly, any of the three shocks will work in that regard. The spring preload is adjustable via the perch, so method is the same from one to another. Damping wise, they can all be adjusted to accommodate varying loads. Naturally, the number of adjustments will vary with the shock model. It goes without saying that the top of the line shock has more adjustment to fine tune. I always tell customers the same thing: if you aren't going to make the adjustment, there is no sense in optioning up a shock that gives more adjustability. However, if you actually use the adjustments and learn/understand their impact, you'll never want a less adjustable shock.
adjust ability is great . click sport . click hit the highway it can make a huge difference. if you know what to do . my snowmobile has ohlins double clickers front, air ride in the rear. my goldwing race tech adjustable rear shock
 

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I want to be able to adjust it for a passenger, or for gear on the back. Maybe once in a while for twisties. I mostly use the bike as a commuter and a weekend romp through the SOCAL mountains. I think the 8900E will be perfect for me, and if not i will upgrade. If you haven't already can you post a how to replace the rear shock? I'm also interested in upgrading the stock fork...im probably around 205-210 with full gear and i like to ride with my wife and with gear that comes to around 350-400ish. I like a fairly smooth ride for my commutes, but i just want the abilities to carry a passanger and cargo. Thanks!

-z
 

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Order placed!

Penske makes a great shock. And it's awesome that Stoltec Moto has worked closely with them to tune these especially for the FZ-09.

Ride quality will be much improved. One thing that I think is under-appreciated in upgrading to a quality, dialed-in suspension is the improvement in braking control, which not only makes riding more enjoyable but can also save your life!
 

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I installed the 8983 double clicker today and went for a brisk ride. Here is what I think. The bike tracks much better now. It is much more in the groove. I had to back off of the compression a little more than usual because the forks are still stock and mushy. Also, bumps don't throw the bike around anymore. I found myself spending much less time making mid corner corrections. Also, I felt much more comfortable carrying more speed and lean angle. I set the sag at 30mm and raised the rear about 1/2 an inch. I know that with stiffer fork springs and 10W fork oil the bike will be where I want it to be. Great investment.
 

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Thanks for the report Doug. You used the shock's height adjustment to raise the rear half an inch? I'm curious why, especially before the forks are sorted.

I might try to find a hose clamp that doen't have the extra screw slots. A black heavy duty zip tie would be niece but I guess even it was strong enough it'd have too much stretchyness.

The Stoltec sticker looks good on the faster Red. ;)



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Thanks for the report Doug. You used the shock's height adjustment to raise the rear half an inch? I'm curious why, especially before the forks are sorted.

I might try to find a hose clamp that doen't have the extra screw slots. A black heavy duty zip tie would be niece but I guess even it was strong enough it'd have too much stretchyness.

The Stoltec sticker looks good on the faster Red. ;)
I took the hose clamp off before my ride. I found some massive zip ties in black at ACE Hardware and put two of them on. The hose clamp bugged me to death.

View attachment 1087
 

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I scuffed it up pretty bad, sorry, but keeping your sticker on the chain guard. I am putting a small red reflective Punisher sticker on the reservoir. Pretty funny really.

I raised the rear before I did the forks because I really don't want to take it apart again. Lazy, I guess.

I used heat shrink for the fire extinguisher clamp on my Polaris RZR, but finding anything more than 4 inches in length is a bitch unless you buy bulk online. The zip ties did the trick.
 

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So how'd you get the shock on?

I've been off the farm too long and lost my mechanical mojo.

P.S. I did those heavy black zip ties on my last Penske reservoir, and they worked great. The FZ1 was fairly easy install. But I'm not sure how to approach the FZ-09.
 
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