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I have never used a paddock stand before - always had a centerstand, but I don't want to flog that dead horse :BangHead:

So i went over to Cycle gear and noticed thay had one on sale - right next to a highly rated Pit bull stand. They look similar in function, so I plumped for the cheapie rear stand, just for giggles. Took a while to find the spoolies and bought a pair of them. At least they will hold my bike cover on at work.

The cheapie stand comes with 2 types of support, a C shaped hook that is meant to push the spoolies up as close as possible to the swing arm, to reduce bending moment forces. It also has flat pads that are spring loaded and rotate in the stand as you push the bike up, with the pads under the rear axle on the swingarm frame.

Lets assume for the moment that either of these 2 devices work as advertised, then the question remains;
- How do you use this type of stand on your own? Both popping it up and rolling it down.
I had my son hold the bike upright, while I fed the stand in and rolled it up. When it was up, it did not feel very stable in the C hooks or on the flat pads - we tried both. It felt like it would roll forward very easily without a weight on the handle to hold it down.

Using this type of stand on your own would seem to be very risky - with regard to bike dropping - is there a trick to it, like getting a bike on a centerstand?

And now for the review of the cheapie stand:
The C hooks are designed wrong (or the spoolies are). They do not provide enough clearance between the top of the stand and the C shape. The result is the end of the spooly is the part that is actually raised - not the smaller diameter. This puts the bending load right at the outside end of the spooly. The worst spot.
The flat pads are a pain to get by the wheel and sprockets because of the spring loading. When I finally got them positioned and the bike lifted, they were a bit more stable than the spoolies, but the pad stopped the rear wheel from turning by hitting the sprocket bolts.

Paddock stands, I'm not impressed.
 
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My only rear stand experience is a cheap non-spool stand that came with a used bike, a nightmare, and Pitbull spooled stands, love them. IMO only get a cheap one if a buddy has one that you can try and you really like it.

First few times you use a stand have someone help. To do it on your own:

Park the bike on it's side stand.

Place the rear stand behind the bike, handle up, the arms that will hold the bike on the floor facing forward.

From the bike's left use the handle bars to bring it vertical, I forget if I put the side stand up at this point.

You can keep the bike vertical either with your left hand gripping something secure at the top rear of the bike(On the 09 there is the passenger seat strap, or pop off the seat, maybe there is a good place to grip under there), or facing towards the rear have the tail of the bike between your left hip and your left hand.

With your right be sure the rear stand is in place under the spools on both sides, push down.

To take the bike off the stand by yourself put the side stand down first, and basically do the reverse of putting the bike on the stand.

As the bike comes down from the stand don't just let it fall on the side stand, be gentle, but be sure you don't let it start going to the right because there is no one on that side to catch it lol.

Practice a few times with someone, it's easy.



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I got the Pit Bull, works great. Also got a Condor front wheel chock, makes the whole deal a no brainer, very stable.
 

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I have never used a paddock stand before - always had a centerstand, but I don't want to flog that dead horse :BangHead:

So i went over to Cycle gear and noticed thay had one on sale - right next to a highly rated Pit bull stand. They look similar in function, so I plumped for the cheapie rear stand, just for giggles. Took a while to find the spoolies and bought a pair of them. At least they will hold my bike cover on at work.

The cheapie stand comes with 2 types of support, a C shaped hook that is meant to push the spoolies up as close as possible to the swing arm, to reduce bending moment forces. It also has flat pads that are spring loaded and rotate in the stand as you push the bike up, with the pads under the rear axle on the swingarm frame.

Lets assume for the moment that either of these 2 devices work as advertised, then the question remains;
- How do you use this type of stand on your own? Both popping it up and rolling it down.
I had my son hold the bike upright, while I fed the stand in and rolled it up. When it was up, it did not feel very stable in the C hooks or on the flat pads - we tried both. It felt like it would roll forward very easily without a weight on the handle to hold it down.

Using this type of stand on your own would seem to be very risky - with regard to bike dropping - is there a trick to it, like getting a bike on a centerstand?

And now for the review of the cheapie stand:
The C hooks are designed wrong (or the spoolies are). They do not provide enough clearance between the top of the stand and the C shape. The result is the end of the spooly is the part that is actually raised - not the smaller diameter. This puts the bending load right at the outside end of the spooly. The worst spot.
The flat pads are a pain to get by the wheel and sprockets because of the spring loading. When I finally got them positioned and the bike lifted, they were a bit more stable than the spoolies, but the pad stopped the rear wheel from turning by hitting the sprocket bolts.

Paddock stands, I'm not impressed.
My stand is cheap but has worked like a champ for 11 years. You may have the C shaped hooks turned around.The tall part of the C should be towards you foot pegs. One man operation just requires technique. I have never ever dropped a bike.

1. I place the bike on the kickstand
2. From the back of the bike, I position the C hooks on the spools tilted for the upper opposite side of course.
3. From the shifter side of the bike facing the back of the bike, I use my hip with left hand across the seat to raise the bike to a level position.
4. While supporting the bike with my left hand and hip, I reposition the stand to meet the spools and apply a little bit of downward pressure to stabilize and hold the bike upright.
5. At this point, I kneel down somewhat and push down on the stand with my right arm to lock it in place.

A note about Pitbull, they are grossly overpriced. I don't need the Ferrari of stands. I never bought a Ducati because I cannot and will not give them that much more money for the bike or the service.

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Stands are on my wish list. I hope Santa Clause brings me some this year! Prolly just coal again :(


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Doug who makes your stand? I'm not sure what to look for in a quality stand but I ride a Yamaha it will do what I want for way less dough than a fancy bike. I'd say the same for a stand if I knew which company (or qualities) to look for.

Also anyone know what size spools the bike takes?

Thx

yatt
 

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Doug who makes your stand? I'm not sure what to look for in a quality stand but I ride a Yamaha it will do what I want for way less dough than a fancy bike. I'd say the same for a stand if I knew which company (or qualities) to look for.

Also anyone know what size spools the bike takes?

Thx

yatt
The shogun Fz1 spools fit. I think most spools are pretty universal fit.
 

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Doug who makes your stand? I'm not sure what to look for in a quality stand but I ride a Yamaha it will do what I want for way less dough than a fancy bike. I'd say the same for a stand if I knew which company (or qualities) to look for.

Also anyone know what size spools the bike takes?

Thx

yatt
Handy Industries, but I think that they quit making them. There are a ton of good options out there. Bike Master seems OK with me. I have a Lockhart Phillips front stand that goes inside the steering stem so that I can remove forks. I bought it almost 15 years ago when the options were limited.
 

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RichBinAZ, you might like the forward handle rear stands better since you stay on the shifter side and can actually hold the bike when putting it up on the stand. Here's a video that explains how to use both stands.

Pit Bull Motorcycle Stands & Accessories: Spooled Forward Handle Rear Stand

Pit bulls are expensive as hell. Don't know if 300$ for front & rear stands is worth it. But you can try another manufacturer that has forward handle rear stands.
 

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I bought the Yamaha spool on fleebay, in black. Cycle Gears has there trackside paddock stand in sales 1/2 price. I bough the whole set for the price of 1 stand. Not full on commercial grade but its strong enough for our little bike and should last forever.
 

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I think you might be over thinking this RichbinzAZ. The paddock stands are very simple and you can get one online for like $29.
Just stand near the tail on kickstand side. Line up the Paddock stand with Your swingarm spools, Push the bike up right, Then just push straight down with the paddock stand, Once the rear stand has pressure on the rear spools it will keep the bike upright so you won't have to hold the bike itself and can lean down and put more pressure on the stands handle. Just make sure its lined up right.

This one should do the trick. Amazon.com: Venom Sport Bike Motorcycle Rear Wheel Swingarm Spool Lift Stand Paddock Stands Fits Yamaha Honda Kawasaki Suzuki Ducati BMW: Automotive
 

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Also, if you take the seat off, you can grab onto the steel piece the seat lock is in, to give you a way to yank the bike back onto the sidestand if it starts to go over to the right. It makes a nice solid handle. And if you turn the steering straight first the bike will want to balance straight up instead of trying to fall left.
 
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