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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The FZ9 oil filter takes a 65mm wrench. I bought a stamped chinese POS, that is now seized to the 1st filter I pulled with it. I'm sure I can find a way to remove it, but if I can't wiggle it off with a 6" extension inserted, I don't want to mess with it every time I pull a filter. It's from "BikeMaster", and the etailer issued a "store credit" on it:
Motorcycle BikeMaster Oil Filter Wrench | MotoSport
I'm going to try one of these next, and will post here if it turns out to be unsatisfactory:
Amazon.com: Amico 13mm Square Drive 65mm 14 Flutes End Cap Style Oil Filter Wrench Tool: Automotive
 

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My cheapo one worked fine on my other bikes - but deformed after removing my first filter, and failed on a friends first FZ-09 filter change. I bought a heavier duty on at Pep Boys. I like the Hi-Flo filters, and just can't justify paying an extra $2 to get the K&N version which has the nut welded on (K&N is made by Hi-Flo).
 

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Personally, I think the nut on a K&N filter IS worth the $2... but that's just me. How much is your time and aggravation worth? I'll spend that $2 any day of the week and twice on Sunday.

I recommend getting one of these:

Auto part
 

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2 suggestions:
1) a strap type wrench works better than those cup type and one strap type wrench will fit a bazillion different filters where the cup types must fit the filter perfectly or they jam up.
Oil Filter Strap Wrench | Motion Pro
Spin-On Oil Filter Wrench | Motion Pro

2) By oil filters with a hex head (typically 19mm) built into the end of the oil filter. K&N brand usually includes a hex head extension.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I already own strap and squeeze type wrenches, but they can require a bit of help/fidgeting until they get a bite, and even then they can slip. Since the header is hot when I change the oil, I wanted something I can slip on, and will stay put while I feed a 6" extension between the header pipes. We'll see how well the Amico cast tool fits...but it does have stellar reviews, unlike the type I bought 1st. Guess I'm always looking for an excuse to buy new tools. The reports I've studied on bobistheoilguy.com show that typically, OEM filters are hard to beat for filtration, and that's why I use OEM on all my engines. :)
 

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Amico makes nice wrenches, after the Toyota dealer seized the oil filter assembly together on my Tundra (Free oil changes for 2 years) I purchased one to change it myself. Real sturdy and zero flex, the Tundra housing is much tighter compared to a bike filter and I never had it slip or cause any issues.

I have a couple knock off oil filter wrenches from way back (99 R6), one for Fram filters and one for the OEM Yamaha - they worked OK for changing the oil on the FZ but the one did get stuck a bit.
 

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I'm beginning to think that just driving the big screw driver through the filter is the easiest way,,
 
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I like the idea of the welded nut, but I don't like choosing filters based on a nut on the end. I have 2 filter wrenches, one is trash, it's always stuck, the other works beautifully. I prefer the yellow Pure One filters. Next week I will see how tight my factory filter is.
 

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I like the idea of the welded nut, but I don't like choosing filters based on a nut on the end. I have 2 filter wrenches, one is trash, it's always stuck, the other works beautifully. I prefer the yellow Pure One filters. Next week I will see how tight my factory filter is.
Be prepared for it to be a bitch to break loose-factory torque on these is ridiculous. Tried 3 different filter wrenches, finally resorted to the big screw driver trick.
 

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Yeah my factory oil filter was WAY over torqued. Just jam a screwdriver in the the filter that doesn't have a nut on the end to make a handle to turn it. I couldn't see why anyone would not get a K&N 204 filter. I have seen them between 13-16 bucks. Well worth it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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ditto that giant channel lock. the only problem is if you crush it down and it still doesn't come off. Then go for the screw driver trick. I agree the K&N filter with the nut seems the way to go. There is also some sort of check valve in that filter that prevents the oil from draining out when engine cools off?
 

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I'm beginning to think that just driving the big screw driver through the filter is the easiest way,,
That's what I thought too, but I made the mistake of "over penetrating" with the screwdriver my first oil change, if you catch my drift. Lol

All fixed now though, but be careful :rolleyes:
 

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Personally, I don't use any wrench to install my oil filters. I just tighten them by hand, I can get enough force on the filter that way to make sure the filter gasket is sufficiently compressed. I've never had an oil leak, so that method seems to work. I do need to use a wrench to get the filter off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Did you punch a hole in your oil cooler? Maybe the $8 Amico isn't such a bad investment.
That's what I thought too, but I made the mistake of "over penetrating" with the screwdriver my first oil change, if you catch my drift. Lol

All fixed now though, but be careful :rolleyes:
 

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If you dont need to admire the used filter, there is no issue with the channel locks. I have a dedicated set that has soft tubing on the jaws. When wet, with oil, this tubing gets sticky and was able to remove the original filter from my Ninja 1000.

Thats saying something. The original Kawasaki oil filters are torqued by several people using torque multipliers. Without exaggerating, I've loosened lug-nuts with less force.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Definitely more than one way to skin a cat. I could have removed the filter using any one of the above mentioned methods, and I have over the 35+ years of changing oil. At least one member here has learned the "right tool for the job" lesson by punching a hole in his oil cooler with a screwdriver. Header pipes get hot enough to melt through mechanics gloves, so I don't want to deal with a burnt hand, either. In any case, the OP purpose was to keep others from making the mistake I did by ordering a cheap stamped tool-something I should have known better than to do:eek:. It's good others are sharing their suggestions, and lessons as well-thanks:)
 

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I already own strap and squeeze type wrenches, but they can require a bit of help/fidgeting until they get a bite, and even then they can slip.
If strap and squeeze type wrenches are slipping, you're over torquing your filters.

The only oil filter that should be challenging to remove with any kind of wrench, is the first one from the factory... which is installed by an angry gorilla.
 

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I've only done one 09 filter change and haven't ridden since. I hand tightened (and I don't have a monster grip), you can feel the filter touch down and then snug, um like a 1/4 turn later. But the original filter!!! The only way it could have been harder to take off was if they had welded it. I have a strap type remover, I forget if I tried it (last fall, old brain) I think I did and it didn't work, slipping or something. I used Big Bite Channel Locks, wasn't going to be putting that filter back on lol.
 
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