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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I ride my bike pretty much every day. I have 12700 miles on it (owned since end of Nov '13), and because of so much riding I keep the chain maintained every weekend.

So a couple thousand miles ago, I notice that the chain has a tight section, like 50% of the chain is tighter than the rest. No big deal, I just keep it clean and lubed and adjust for the tight section.
Well I start hearing it making noise, and then start to find individual tight links. I keep imagining the uneven tension wracking those output shaft bearings and decided it was time to order and install new chain & sprockets.

12000 seems pretty early to me, and after taking it apart I see that the chain is almost perfect except for 6 tight links... 3 or 4 were almost seized. WTF! Sprocket teeth look almost new, but I figure what the hell just replace them and keep the old ones since they look so good still.

What I think is weird is there's really no chain "stretch", just those tight links. The rest feels like a new chain! Snug and clean.

So punched out a couple of the tight pins and found some weird charcoal powder and crispy carbon stuff in between the pin and inner bushing. Smells like burnt stuff. Plus the pin looks pretty mangled. O Rings look okay.

What the hell? Anyone have a chain do this before? I emailed DID to see what they have to say about it, but haven't heard back.

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Shiny carbon stuff above, and remnants of powdery carbon stuff.
Soil Rock

PS Regina chain list for pin failure:

Failure of chain pins, rollers or bushings

• Excessive loads, heavy shock loads (for motorcycles without cushioning in drive train)
• Excessive sprocket wear or damage
• Excessive chain elongation due to wear
• Insufficient lubrication
• Improper chain tension
• Misalignment of sprockets
• Misalignment of guides or tensioners
• Mismatching the size of chain with the sprocket size
• Front sprocket with less than 15 teeth
• Foreign objects between chain and sprocket
 

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My guess would be o-ring failure and the associated pins dried out and failed.
Just out of curiosity,what are you using to clean and lube the chain with
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
My guess would be o-ring failure and the associated pins dried out and failed.
Just out of curiosity,what are you using to clean and lube the chain with
Same stuff I've been using for probably 20-30 thousand miles.
Maxima Cleanup on cold chain, gentle grunge brush scrub, a gentle rinse (like the can says), dry the chain in the sun, then thoroughly lube with Motul road lube.
Maybe the grunge brush forced some shit past the orings...


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I'd say the grunge brush is the culprit for o-ring failure. You just don't need that for anything aside from a dirt bike or quad which is caked with mud and muck...and they typically don't have o-ring chains.

The other products you're using are top-shelf.
 

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12K is a bit early, most bike chains will do 20K.
The amount of grease that can be in the rivet area, between the O-rings, is really tiny so perhaps this one got less on these pins
I have never cleaned the chains on any of the bikes I've had, just lubed them when the rollers became silvery, usually about every 600 miles with suzuki's s-moly.

Did you check the old sprocket tooth profiles against the new ones? It can be quite eye opening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
bought oem chain $75 oem rubber lined front sprocket $30 and Sprocketcenter.com steel rear sprocket $60 shipped.
Rides like a dream again. That extra $10 for the rubber lined countershaft sprocket is worth it. those cheap ones sing sing sing too much for me
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
12K is a bit early, most bike chains will do 20K.

Did you check the old sprocket tooth profiles against the new ones? It can be quite eye opening.
Yep, that's my experience too, about 20k.
Yep, old sprockets look damn near as good as the new ones! I kept it clean and lubed very often, so if the sprockets are any indication of anything, I was doing something right.

Also, I didn't let it go too slack nor too tight. Always kept no less than 1 inch slack at the tightest part of the chain.

I think it's weird that it burned out those pins at around 10k mi.
 

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I use Motul chain cleaner on a hot chain. let it soak in for 5 minutes. Hit it again with the cleaner, brush it with grunge brush. One more hit of chain cleaner then wipe it down with a cloth. At this point the chain clean and dry. Then I coat it with Motul chain grease and let it sit over night.

zero issues so far.
 

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Most modern dirt bikes have o-ring chains, by the way. I have learned to lube a chain half as much as I think that it needs, which cuts way down on buildup, which brings me to not ever needing to clean a chain. I learned in the dirt to not scrub a chain unless it is absolutely necessary. O-rings are fragile. I always wear the sprockets out before the chains but replace all three together, probably due to my wheelie prone nature that puts great stress on the sprockets.
 

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I'm using Tunnelvision's method but not really brushing. Hot chain then spray with Motul cleaner. Soak then wipe with soft cloth. i remove the front sprocket cover to clean out all the gunk that builds up inside the chain guide. I might be using too much lube. Using Motul also. Just did this today after short Ortega ride.
 

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I used to clean my chains with a toothbrush and kerosene before wiping them dry and treating them with PJ1 blue label lube.
Now, I rarely actually clean a chain and they last longer than before.
I installed a Scottoiler and fill it with BelRay Gear Saver gear oil after the Scottoil supply runs out. The chain never runs dry and gunk is literally washed away as I ride. Does it fling off? Yes. But, it's not the huge mess it would suggest. If the rear wheel starts to look a bit dirty, I wipe it and the chain down with WD-40, dry it with a clean rag and apply a little DuPont general purpose teflon lube until the next ride. Some will swear WD-40 kills o-rings. I beg to differ. I have placed o-rings from a chain in a small cup of the stuff and left it for several weeks. No change. What little my chains see during clean up time is far less than that immersion experiment. XL600V, DL1000 and KLR650 chains lasted 20K+ this way.

Here's a FZ-8 chain after 10k miles.

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Properly maintained chain and sprockets should last 30-40k. If I were only getting 20k I would be concerned.
 

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I had one kink in the DID chain on my Hawk GT; I decided to thoroughly clean the chain using Motul chain cleaner and a Grunge brush, followed by lubing the chain. It wasn't long after that my chain developed multiple kinks and became very noisy (but like the OP the chain showed zero stretching). I got a new EK chain installed and now only use WD40 sprayed on a rag first and then wiped on the chain to clean, followed by lube (Belray Super Clean). The EK chain is very quiet and the rear wheel spins more freely that it has in a long time. This is hardly scientific proof of anything, but I don't think I'll be spraying chain cleaner directly on the chain, or using the Grunge brush again. YMMV, etc.
 

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So I ride my bike pretty much every day. I have 12700 miles on it (owned since end of Nov '13), and because of so much riding I keep the chain maintained every weekend.

So a couple thousand miles ago, I notice that the chain has a tight section, like 50% of the chain is tighter than the rest. No big deal, I just keep it clean and lubed and adjust for the tight section.
Well I start hearing it making noise, and then start to find individual tight links. I keep imagining the uneven tension wracking those output shaft bearings and decided it was time to order and install new chain & sprockets.

12000 seems pretty early to me, and after taking it apart I see that the chain is almost perfect except for 6 tight links... 3 or 4 were almost seized. WTF! Sprocket teeth look almost new, but I figure what the hell just replace them and keep the old ones since they look so good still.

What I think is weird is there's really no chain "stretch", just those tight links. The rest feels like a new chain! Snug and clean.

So punched out a couple of the tight pins and found some weird charcoal powder and crispy carbon stuff in between the pin and inner bushing. Smells like burnt stuff. Plus the pin looks pretty mangled. O Rings look okay.

What the hell? Anyone have a chain do this before? I emailed DID to see what they have to say about it, but haven't heard back.

View attachment 10562
View attachment 10563
View attachment 10564
View attachment 10565


Shiny carbon stuff above, and remnants of powdery carbon stuff.
View attachment 10566

PS Regina chain list for pin failure:

Failure of chain pins, rollers or bushings

• Excessive loads, heavy shock loads (for motorcycles without cushioning in drive train)
• Excessive sprocket wear or damage
• Excessive chain elongation due to wear
• Insufficient lubrication
• Improper chain tension
• Misalignment of sprockets
• Misalignment of guides or tensioners
• Mismatching the size of chain with the sprocket size
• Front sprocket with less than 15 teeth
• Foreign objects between chain and sprocket
I've just noticed this exact same issue now. I've just passed the 20,000km mark, which seems a bit premature to me...
The OEM parts here are rediculously priced, so much that even my local yamaha certified garage recommended a replacement kit (JT sprockets and a good chain).

I just realized that the original front sprocket has a rubber coating whereas the JT sprocket doesn't. Is this a big issue, or can I simply ignore it?
I realize it will be a little more noisy... but is it worth paying double the price?
Feel free to chip in if you've go experience with regular sprockets on this bike.
 

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Rubber is only for noise reduction.
 
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