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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
no rear wheel spin on paddock stand

So I just got my first paddock stand and completed a full oil change.
Once the bike was on the stand I noticed the rear wheel isn't freely spinning as I believed was meant to be the case..
The wheel when spun by hand makes a slight noise, like the breaks are grabbing slightly.
Is this most likely the cause? If so how do I adjust the breaks?

Could anyone give me some pointers on what could be causing this?

Oh and I went with motul 7100 10w40 can't wait to see if I notice any difference.
Much appreciated!
 

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Some brake and chain drag is normal. With my 09 on the rear stand if I put my bare foot on the tire and spin it down it keeps turning less than a full turn.

The owner's manual has a tight number for the chain tension, IMO put it on the loose side of that, about 26mm.
 

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If you are not using spools, and are using the blocks like mine the block on the sprocket side may be clipping the bolt heads. All you need to do is move the sprocket side block out a little bit. This is what happened to mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Some brake and chain drag is normal. With my 09 on the rear stand if I put my bare foot on the tire and spin it down it keeps turning less than a full turn.

The owner's manual has a tight number for the chain tension, IMO put it on the loose side of that, about 26mm.
Thanks bob, I believe it is fine to set the chain tension whilst on the paddock stand?

I got 26mm too. Factory spec is too tight
Cheers fizzer

If you are not using spools, and are using the blocks like mine the block on the sprocket side may be clipping the bolt heads. All you need to do is move the sprocket side block out a little bit. This is what happened to mine.
Using spools thanks chefedij.
 

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2 things everyone should do at their convenience..

- As said earlier, set chain tension to roughly 1 to 1.25" total slack, ignore that crazy spec the owners manual calls for.

- When tightening your rear axle nut after the chain adjustment, do NOT follow the factory manual and torque it to 108 pounds, that's a crazy typo. 65 pounds is more than enough.

See how the rear wheel spins afterward.
 

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THAT IS NOT A TYPO!! Yamaha has spec'c 107 '/# for many years..... Go lower at your own risk. My FJ12 WILL shift the rear axle if not torqued over 100 '/#.
 

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...Once the bike was on the stand I noticed the rear wheel isn't freely spinning as I believed was meant to be the case..
The wheel when spun by hand makes a slight noise, like the brakes are grabbing slightly.Is this most likely the cause?...
I recently bought my first paddock stand and noticed the same symptom. Take a look on the paddock stand where the rear wheel may come in slight contact with the cross member of the stand. If that's the case, as it was for me, you need to raise the height of the paddock on either side to allow clearance for the rotating tire. I'm sure 1/2" or so will give you that clearance.
 

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I think "freely spinning" is subjective. We need a video.

There is minor brake drag, and driveline drag. If your bike is idling on that stand in neutral, the rear wheel will spin also. Don't expect it to spin like a bicycle wheel.
 

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Stock Hayabusa with 170 rear wheel horsepower and over 100 pound of torque only needs 72 foot pounds used on the rear axle nut, what the manual calls for. I know riders with over 240,000 miles on their Busa's and they've had zero issue with the rear axle moving or any other problems in the back end, aside from tire lifespan. ZX14's with 190 rear wheels horsepower and 110 pound of torque, the manual calls for the rear axle nut to be tightened to 94 foot pounds of torque.

Why would an FZ9, a bike with a very normal sized swingarm and axle diameter/nut size, with only 105 rear wheel horsepower and 59 pounds of torque, somehow need 108 foot pounds?

Why do you think that's not an error when the manual has substantial mistakes elsewhere, such as stating the oil drain plug should be tightened to 31 foot pounds instead of 13 and the chain spec stating it should be 0.2 - 0.59 inches of slack instead of a more reasonable and utilized 1.0 - 1.25 inches of slack?
 

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I'm not saying it isn't a misprint, but many of my past bikes have had 100+ ft/lb spec'd.

Yes the manual is full of misprints, but I wouldn't assume everything is a misprint, and since it coincides with previous bikes I've owned, I'm inclined to adhere to it.

Owners can do what they like, many people don't even own a torque wrench and just go on feel. I doesn't have to be a point of contention, I think we are just saying that 108ft/lb is not unheard of. Now, 3/8" chain slack, I've not seen in the past 20 years.
 

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Stock Hayabusa with 170 rear wheel horsepower and over 100 pound of torque only needs 72 foot pounds used on the rear axle nut, what the manual calls for. I know riders with over 240,000 miles on their Busa's and they've had zero issue with the rear axle moving or any other problems in the back end, aside from tire lifespan. ZX14's with 190 rear wheels horsepower and 110 pound of torque, the manual calls for the rear axle nut to be tightened to 94 foot pounds of torque.

Why would an FZ9, a bike with a very normal sized swingarm and axle diameter/nut size, with only 105 rear wheel horsepower and 59 pounds of torque, somehow need 108 foot pounds?

Why do you think that's not an error when the manual has substantial mistakes elsewhere, such as stating the oil drain plug should be tightened to 31 foot pounds instead of 13 and the chain spec stating it should be 0.2 - 0.59 inches of slack instead of a more reasonable and utilized 1.0 - 1.25 inches of slack?
Something to keep in mind here as well; clamping force is a function of the thread size, pitch, fastener (axle in this case) material, and applied torque. I know you mention "normal" axle and nut size on the FZ but really both the front and rear are quite small on comparison to most other 100+ hp bikes. From what I could find with a quick net search, the Hayabusa that you mentioned has a M25x1.5 rear axle nut while the FZ has an M18x1.5. Assuming a similar clamping force is required it is not surprising to see a higher recommended torque value to what we have become accustomed to seeing. Just a thought..
 
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