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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello everybody.

Hope you are all well.

I’m from the UK and I’m just here to introduce myself and say hello.
Purchased my first bike yesterday ( collect next week ). 15 plate mt09 sport tracker, 8k miles on the clock, pretty much immaculate condition and I can not wait to get riding.

Look forward to joining you all and chatting to everyone on the forums.
Cheers.
Craig.

165241
 

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Welcome to the club, KitaBoro. Nice looking motorbike, especially the wheels. Great color. Enjoy the ride and keep safe.
 

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Welcome from North London. Just a few Brits on here, but enthusiastic nonetheless. Those side-plates will be brilliant for throw-over panniers. I like the exhaust and the front mud-guard treatment on the Street Tracker.
 

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hello mate ! Welcome. Given the MT is your first bike, i'd say, be careful mate. Its a lot of bike for essentially a first timer. Go easy at first. Maybe spend a few weeks in B mode. Ride like you're invisible. As in expect expect every car that pulls to a t-junction to not see you and be ready if they pull out. Always be on the ready. Anticipate every other motorists move. Never ride in someone's blind spot for example. I'm 50 next yr, but been riding since a kid, so made it through my hoon days. Mind you the bikes were a fair bit slower back then, but i always kept the above in mind... Enjoy, England has some amazing country lanes to rip around. Just get to know the road before going all in.
 

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I'm new to riding after a 40 year layoff. I've found watching DanDan the Fireman's youtube videos helpful.
Thankyou very much and welcome back to riding. I will check him out now.
I’ve watched a handful of that guy’s (I dunno, 10,000?) videos, and I’m not terribly impressed. I’m sure there is some useful information in there, but you have to already know better in order to pick it out. There’s a lot of BS that’s just plain wrong.

You’d be well-advised to take a good riding school, like ChampStreet or Total Control, and I’m sure there are others. I don’t spend a lot of time watching instructional videos on YouTube, so I can’t say who’s worthy of watching (others here could, I’m sure), but DD the FM is not your best source of information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
hello mate ! Welcome. Given the MT is your first bike, i'd say, be careful mate. Its a lot of bike for essentially a first timer. Go easy at first. Maybe spend a few weeks in B mode. Ride like you're invisible. As in expect expect every car that pulls to a t-junction to not see you and be ready if they pull out. Always be on the ready. Anticipate every other motorists move. Never ride in someone's blind spot for example. I'm 50 next yr, but been riding since a kid, so made it through my hoon days. Mind you the bikes were a fair bit slower back then, but i always kept the above in mind... Enjoy, England has some amazing country lanes to rip around. Just get to know the road before going all in.
Hi mate. I will be extremely careful on the new bike, people are dangerous enough when I’m driving a car so can only imagine when on a bike. I look forward to exploring England’s country roads on a bike. Definitely will take it easy though. Cheers for the advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Welcome from North London. Just a few Brits on here, but enthusiastic nonetheless. Those side-plates will be brilliant for throw-over panniers. I like the exhaust and the front mud-guard treatment on the Street Tracker.
hi John. Thanks. The only thing I will change straight away are the colour of the side plates. Going with a carbon wrap. But agree they will great for throw over panniers.
 

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You’d be well-advised to take a good riding school, like ChampStreet or Total Control, and I’m sure there are others. I don’t spend a lot of time watching instructional videos on YouTube, so I can’t say who’s worthy of watching (others here could, I’m sure), but DD the FM is not your best source of information.
2nd this - if you want to be safe and be a better rider statistics show riders who take 'classes' are statistically much less likely to get in an accident. Whatever class you choose to take should include 'trail braking' as a topic. This is a key skill for continuing to ride safely on the street - nearly every single 'cornering' crash on DDFM's channel could have been avoided if the rider had been trained, and had practiced trail braking.
 

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Agreed. I am going to take emergency first aid this summer too. I have enough room in my saddle bags for a small Trauma kit. Hope to never need it my brothers but if I can help I will.
 
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