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It mostly will depend on you. If you have restraint you could be fine. The will not try to rocket away from you unless you tell it to by whacking the throttle open, but it can also build speed so smooth and so quickly as to be deceptive which can get you in to trouble in a hurry.

Many times I've talked with people with the same question about some bike they're looking at. Generally, they're somewhat intimidated by the bike and they never enjoy riding it, even if they actually don't have problems riding it safely.

There's nothing wrong with starting out on a smaller, less powerful bike. There's a lot of new feelings, sensations and coordination to get used to. It's more enjoyable and easier to learn on a smaller bike imo. Then, after a year or a few, when you're comfortable and ready to get something "bigger and better" ... that move up feels very satisfying. Much more satisfying then feeling like you've been riding a "big bike" but weren't comfortable being able to use it.
 

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@Shinyribs 's reply is probably one of the best I've seen to this question. He/she makes some very good, not always mentioned, points. I know the "they never enjoy riding it" comment was true for me when I started out on a FJ-09 in 2015. It took me a good 6-9 months before I felt like I enjoyed riding and then even some more time before I felt really comfortable (add in some training and track days too).

Good luck with your decision.
 

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Agree 100% with the above, especially since you have no riding experience! Much easier, less intimidating, you will have more fun, and safer to learn on a small displacement bike. Ride it for a year and if you bought right you can likely sell if for what you paid! Believe me, the smaller bikes will have more than enough power to keep a new rider entertained.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for replies. I am afraid that starting with a smaller cc may cause me regret in a short time because when I got my license I practiced with a 100cc bike only for 30 minutes before the exam and I figured everything out in the first 10 minutes and 15 minutes later I was speeding in 4th gear. I am afraid that I will get used to a bike under 600 cc in very short time and will want to switch to a higher cc.
 

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Thanks for replies. I am afraid that starting with a smaller cc may cause me regret in a short time because when I got my license I practiced with a 100cc bike only for 30 minutes before the exam and I figured everything out in the first 10 minutes and 15 minutes later I was speeding in 4th gear. I am afraid that I will get used to a bike under 600 cc in very short time and will want to switch to a higher cc.
You seem to be focusing on the wrong aspects as a new rider, dont focus on power and top speed, focus on learning how to ride and staying alive in traffic. Trust me, as a beginner there is SO MUCH experience to be learned, you will not be riding a 600-700cc bike to its fullest potential -safely- any time soon. Learn to ride first.

Riding is MUCH more than learning how the brake, clutch and throttle operate, you need hundreds of hours to become competent in traffic and having the experience to react in a split second to ANY sudden situation while all of the bike controls are second nature muscle memory, not something you pause and think about in a panic situation.
 

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I reckon if you are starting out and want to most quickly improve your riding skills, get a relatively small (<500cc) inexpensive bike, that you wont be as afraid to drop.
Nothing too old, think 10yr old Ninja 400, CB500F or similar... enough power but not too much, not too heavy, neutral handling, reliable.
In my opinion, riding lots of different bikes is the key to improving your skills, buy ride and sell cheapish bikes, take test rides, swap and ride your mates bikes...
Sample as many different riding experiences during your journey to riding the bikes you aspire to own, it will make you a more well-rounded rider and you will enjoy the journey a lot more.
If you buy a new 09 as your first bike, you wont improve as quickly, it has too much power and you have too much $$ in it.
You can certainly learn on an 09 but you will be naturally more timid than you would be on something more suitable, and your learning curve will likely suffer as a result.

And you didn't figure everything out in 10 minutes, that is the beauty of riding bikes, you are always learning... the more you ride the more you realise this.
 

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I disagree. if you drive an F-150 and decide to get a Mustang Cobra, who is anybody to tell you not to ?
Just because you want to buy a powerful machine doesn't mean you have to ride like a Bat Out of Hell.
Situational awareness is paramount, but one can get in trouble regardless of the displacement of your machine.
Often, having more power can get you out of situations with just a twist of the wrist.
I think you can buy the bike you want and ride safely, avoid roads that you know you should.
Develop your skills on back roads.

AND ALWAYS LOOK OUT FOR BLUE HAIRED OLD LADIES !

I had to throw that in there
 

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Anyone that has ZERO riding experience in my opinion, should not start off on a high performance motorcycle! Can it be done...of course...has it been done..yes! BUT the potential for things to end up REALLY bad is much higher then starting off on something that is much more manageable should things go sideways! I would give that advice to my best friend, son, or grandson.

Entirely new skill sets are needed for riding a motorcycle as compared to what you have now coming from 4 wheels...and I firmly believe they are best learned on a more forgiving ride!
 

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Age also plays a part in restraint. The first bike I put my wife on was a CBR600F2, she upgraded to a R6 Yamaha, a much more potent bike, then an FZ-09. She was fortunate to follow an experienced teacher every time she rode, mimicking my moves, my pace, and braking points. She had maturity on her side. There is no shame in owning a MT-07, a quick and nimble bike. Some of the best racers in the world sharpened their skills on nimble 2-stroke 250's as I did on 2-stroke 350's.

Believe me, there will be times when you are faced with a life-threatening situation, be it a turn that you are coming in too hot. Your decision and reaction in the blink of an eye will determine your fate. Can you remain calm in the face of death without so much as raising your heart rate, and commit without hesitation to leaning in without fear as far as the bike will go drifting both tires. I can and I have, but that still doesn't guarantee a safe outcome.
 

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A lighter bike with a lower seat height is probably better for learning basic roadcraft in the first 12 months. I don't think it's the MT09 power that's the issue - it's more to do with its weight and height that could sap your learning confidence during the early months.
This exactly. I'm 6'2" with a 34" inseam. Compared to my dirt bikes, my 09 feels like a top heavy tank between my legs and I'm not a little guy. My 07 was one slightly lighter, but it felt short and skinny between the legs.

I still miss my 07. It had more torque down low than the 09, sounded amazing, got another 10mpg, beautiful handling and comparable brakes. That's a fantastic learner bike that won't leave you wanting for power in a couple years. And the low center of gravity really helps with low speed maneuvers.
 

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Two years ago my buddy and I ran across a guy that was a mountain bicyclist and never road a motorcycle . He was riding a brand new MT07. Background ..my buddy and I have been riding together since 2003 and both of us was on FZ1's then I moved to the FZ09 in 2014. Both of us are in our 60's now and the new kid was about 35~37. When we got together with the guy on the MT07 we told him to ride his own ride and not to worry about keeping up with us and that we would wait for him at any T-intersection or 4 way. He road with us a few times and we road at about 50% of what we would normaly do so my buddy and I always dialed it down a bit with him in tow so we decided to wick it up a bit after 4~5 rides with him and needless to say he was trying to keep up and this went sideways fast.. I was leading he was 2nd and my buddy was in the back I went around a slight bend and the MT07 was a bit behind me and the next corner I did not see him so I turned around and found he had over shot the corner went off rode riding hit a ditch that was in the field he flew so did the bike. He came out ok with no extreme injuries just soreness all over and yes he was in full gear...The bike not so lucky It was totaled with the front forks torn off the bike with other damage as you would suspect . He healed up and with-in 6~7 months he had a brand new MT07. We ran across him the next year and we went riding..this time on a nice open two lane road with some high speeds then corners and switch backs very nice newly paved road with semi's and dump trucks every now and then ,My buddy was position #1 I was next and the MT07 last . We where going at a good pace and hit one sweeping 90deg and I looked back and he had drifted out into the on coming traffic lane on a blind corner "Thank God nothing was coming at us in the other lane" scared the shit out of me ! We stopped a few miles down the road and asked him about it and he said he was coasting !!! I stated WTF coasting in the other lane ? I finally told him I was not going to ride with him until he gets more time under his belt because I am not the one to call his wife and say that he died ! Long story short a few months later he sold his bike and went back to mountain biking ! So yes a smaller cc bike can still get you in trouble and that is all up to you on how you decide to ride !
 

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Can't say all but most of the time the person asking the question has already made up his mind.
This may be the hundredth time I've come up and there's usually 2 answers:

1) Never get a heavy / big / powerful bike (with some very reasonable explanation)
2) Get whatever you want. Either:

2a) some macho / squid argument
2b) something about self control
2c) electronics being so good (in recent years)

Just pick something sensible from above and move on. Please just don't jeopardize other people's lives.
 

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This exactly. I'm 6'2" with a 34" inseam. Compared to my dirt bikes, my 09 feels like a top heavy tank between my legs and I'm not a little guy. My 07 was one slightly lighter, but it felt short and skinny between the legs.

I still miss my 07. It had more torque down low than the 09, sounded amazing, got another 10mpg, beautiful handling and comparable brakes. That's a fantastic learner bike that won't leave you wanting for power in a couple years. And the low center of gravity really helps with low speed maneuvers.
You're kidding....right? Not long after I bought my FZ09, my wife bought the FZ07. I did the break in miles on the 07 for her, so I had several hundred miles on the bike, and there is not even a slim chance that the 07 had more torque down low, in mid range or the top end. I'm certainly NOT saying the FZ07 isn't a great bike, but there is no way to compare the power or torque between the 07 and the 09...it's not even close.
 

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You're kidding....right? Not long after I bought my FZ09, my wife bought the FZ07. I did the break in miles on the 07 for her, so I had several hundred miles on the bike, and there is not even a slim chance that the 07 had more torque down low, in mid range or the top end. I'm certainly NOT saying the FZ07 isn't a great bike, but there is no way to compare the power or torque between the 07 and the 09...it's not even close.
Beat me to it lol. Have owned both 07 and 09, can confirm, the 07 will not touch the 09 torque wise anywhere within the rev range.
 
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