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Discussion Starter #21
6', 185 lbs here and a body seriously abused racing motocross (knees, back, and wrists). I put a Seat Concepts seat on mine as well as different bars, Pro Grip gel Superbike grips, FZ6 rubber footpegs, and an MRA Touring screen. The setup is great for me now. I rode the bike 800 miles and back to COTA in Austin TX without any major back issues.
You give me hope. I don't really know much about swapping out bars (difficulty and cost). So I'll do some research on that and maybe that will help. It seems that my hip position and leg angles are the primary culprit. Excuse my ignorance, but what benefit does the rubber pegs provide? (vibration reduction? It wouldn't really change ergonomics right?) Someone here mentioned $160 for the seat concepts seat which is reasonable- I'll look more into that. Do you have pics or additional comments on that particular seat?
 

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First of all, welcome to the forum, it"s a good one. You may be surprised at what a small (1"-2") change in ergos can do for comfort. Lower pegs, not rearsets, and lower bars are less than $150 total. Check ebay for adjustable pegs. You could also be aching from straining against the wind on the naked FZ09. Even most "touring" screens for the FZ usually end just a few inches above the instrument cluster. They'll take the pressure off your torso but not your neck. Are you relaxed or tense when you ride?

Pretty good writing/typing for thumbs on a phone.
 

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You are pretty spot on. A jack of all trades bike is what I want. I thought/think the FZ could/can work for me, but maybe I will end up with something more in line with the group of bikes you listed. I will be patient and see what the next couple of months hold. Completely reworking the suspension is out of the question. I like to tinker, but if I have to put that much time, energy and money into it, I'm just going to go get a platform that works for me out of the box. It really doesn't take that many of the modifications mentioned in this thread to reach the FJ-09 crate price. I'm not saying that the FJ-09 would be the next bike, but that next level is not that for away in price. We'll see and I'll keep you guys posted. Good input.
For what it's worth, the Suzuki I mentioned is an updated version of the older Bandit 1200, which is arguably the last of the "true" UJMs.
 

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I actually completely upholstered my stock seat from scratch using leftover automotive seat foam. It's spectacular feeling. If you're up to it it's kind of fun to make the seat fit you.
 

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UJM was also a phrase that meant that all Japanese bikes were the same, copies of each other, all very good, but all the same bike with different badges. No soul. in my opinion, a slightly derogatory phrase that became something else.
The MT 09 is not a UJM, it is unlike every other jap bike on the market at the moment.
Is is a bike that can do everything, though, if you let it.
 

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what benefit does the rubber pegs provide? (vibration reduction? It wouldn't really change ergonomics right?)
Well, from a guy that owns the rubber pegs without a true FZ, I think you are correct. I don't like the FZ bare metal pegs, so in anticipation of my FZ purchase, I've already have the pegs. Almost no money, and yes it will be both less vibration and probably more comfort. They have more top surface area, somewhat wider, and people report that it much better.
http://www.fz09.org/forum/6-fz-09-general-discussion/7621-footpeg-upgrade-options.html

I got these...nice quality...Amazon.com: Footpeg Front Footrest Foot Pegs For Yamaha FZ6R FJR1300 03-13 FZ6 YZFR1 XV1700: Automotive
 

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First thing I suggest, maybe you mentioned it and I missed it, but you need to go take a motorcycle safety class.

Motorcycle riding skills are very perishable and if you have not been riding for 10 years, you are a noob. Your insurance company will appreciate you taking the class. Your wife will appreciate it.

I teach new and experienced riders every week in basic and more advanced riding courses and they all learn something from the classes. Some learn a lot, some learn a little, but all learn something and you can never know all there is to know about riding, there is always more to learn.

Also, if you have not been riding for many years there are many muscles in your body that are not used for anything else in the same way and those muscles are going to be yelling at you as they get back in shape so take breaks often and don't beat yourself up about it. Your endurance will come back soon enough.

As to getting the bike comfortable to you, take it back to the dealership and ask them to help you adjust the handlebars, the brake, clutch and gear levers to fit you.

I also suggest minimizing the slop in the throttle cable as that makes the throttle less jerky in on-off-on throttle transitions.

I also suggest reading a couple of riding books to make sure you are sitting on the bike properly and using the controls properly. I recommend Nick Ienatsch's book for the most part as it is well written and well illustrated but there are others as well.

I see people sitting on their bikes wrong all the time. This messes up their control inputs.

The biggest things I see people doing wrong is holding onto the bike with the handlebars instead of their knees. Handlebars are control inputs NOT hand holds.

Your knees squeezing the tank hold you onto the bike, not your hands on the handlebars.

Related to that: the balls of your feet should be on the pegs and you should be pushing down a little with your legs. This does several things:
1) weights the pegs a little and that effectively lowers the CG of the bike
2) weighting the inside peg in the turn gives you better control and weighting the outside peg helps you stand the bike up coming out of a turn
3) placing the balls of your feet on the pegs gives you better feel for the pegs and weighting/unweighting the pegs while also keeping your toes from accidentally dragging in turns (duck feet) and unintentionally applying rear brake or shifting when your toes are hovering or resting on the brake lever/shifter
4) pushing down with your feet pushes your knees into the tank which holds you to the bike better
5) pushing down with your feet causes the muscles in your back and abdomen to tone up and support your body better on the bike so yo aren't leaning on the handlebars

And, as others have said, go ride more and worry less.
 

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We used to call metal footpegs, vibrapegs. The rubber top pegs dampen vibration, are wider and flatter which reduces fatigue on longer rides. My CBR954RR came with rubber top pegs and it was a true sportbike.
 

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Have you considered that adding a lot of preload to the front and rear has made the bike ride like a brick outhouse, and that is why you are so sore? A stock FZ-09 is not as bad as you are describing it. Take the preload back out and give it another try.
I agree with CD599 on this one! I am 6 ft 170 lbs and I thought I would tighten up the suspension (front and rear) a little for a slightly better riding feel. I set my bike to sport rider specs, and that was a mistake at my weight. My FZ-09 beat the ever living $hit out of me. It was jarring me to the bone every bump I hit. I found a happy middle ground with the suspension and I am completely happy with the maneuverability and also the ride comfort of the bike. Best of luck to you getting everything dialed in... Hate to see you leave such a great machine!

P.S.- Every bike I have owned has "broken in" over time. That means every part of the bike. My suspension has eased up, engine broken in, etc., and overall enjoyment has increased as well.
 

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I liked this post so much I thought it was worth repeating & given the opportunity for a second read; So here it is:


First thing I suggest, maybe you mentioned it and I missed it, but you need to go take a motorcycle safety class.

Motorcycle riding skills are very perishable and if you have not been riding for 10 years, you are a noob. Your insurance company will appreciate you taking the class. Your wife will appreciate it.

I teach new and experienced riders every week in basic and more advanced riding courses and they all learn something from the classes. Some learn a lot, some learn a little, but all learn something and you can never know all there is to know about riding, there is always more to learn.

Also, if you have not been riding for many years there are many muscles in your body that are not used for anything else in the same way and those muscles are going to be yelling at you as they get back in shape so take breaks often and don't beat yourself up about it. Your endurance will come back soon enough.

As to getting the bike comfortable to you, take it back to the dealership and ask them to help you adjust the handlebars, the brake, clutch and gear levers to fit you.

I also suggest minimizing the slop in the throttle cable as that makes the throttle less jerky in on-off-on throttle transitions.

I also suggest reading a couple of riding books to make sure you are sitting on the bike properly and using the controls properly. I recommend Nick Ienatsch's book for the most part as it is well written and well illustrated but there are others as well.

I see people sitting on their bikes wrong all the time. This messes up their control inputs.

The biggest things I see people doing wrong is holding onto the bike with the handlebars instead of their knees. Handlebars are control inputs NOT hand holds.

Your knees squeezing the tank hold you onto the bike, not your hands on the handlebars.

Related to that: the balls of your feet should be on the pegs and you should be pushing down a little with your legs. This does several things:
1) weights the pegs a little and that effectively lowers the CG of the bike
2) weighting the inside peg in the turn gives you better control and weighting the outside peg helps you stand the bike up coming out of a turn
3) placing the balls of your feet on the pegs gives you better feel for the pegs and weighting/unweighting the pegs while also keeping your toes from accidentally dragging in turns (duck feet) and unintentionally applying rear brake or shifting when your toes are hovering or resting on the brake lever/shifter
4) pushing down with your feet pushes your knees into the tank which holds you to the bike better
5) pushing down with your feet causes the muscles in your back and abdomen to tone up and support your body better on the bike so yo aren't leaning on the handlebars

And, as others have said, go ride more and worry less.
 

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I'd say go rent a GS for a day and see if it makes any difference????

But not having ridden for ten years, it's not only your new bike that needs to be broken in, your body is going to have to be broken in as well.

I mention this because my brother and myself went through the same aches and pains getting back into dirt biking after a ten year absence. It took a few days after the first ride to be able to move around and not look like a crippled old man.

As time went on, things got better once we beat ourselves back into shape, lol.

If renting a GS solves the aches and pains, then maybe it is the 09's ergonomics that are a part of the problem. Unfortunately not everyone is made to fit every bike out there.
 

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If I were the OP I'd make some minimal modifications to the '09, rather than hoping the bike will Break-in and as he gets a little more comfortable with it, it too becomes more forgiving for him -- Making a few Mod's sure beats the crap out of losing thousandsof dollar$ in trade-in at the stealership since they'll only offer Kelly Blue Book numbers.

My suspension was bought on EBay for $99 and the folk springs set was $95 delivered from Sonic Springs. Puig windscreen was $105. The rest can wait. But for several hundred the '09 can be transformed into what it should have been right out of the crate. The bar can be replaced and is available on EBay for under $100 if that'll make a significant difference.

IMHO, there is NO such thing as new bike that won't require several personalized farkles that correct what the owner believes are the bikes shortcomings.....It goes with the territory. :cool:
 

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So 4+ years later, I'm curious about how things turned out. Did you get used to the bike or are you rockin' an ultra plush 2016 Gold Wing?
 
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