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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Need LS Fork Cap, Update, Saved Tube , Jan 7

Had a bit of a setback, today , when I was going to change fork oil.

Had the front wheel off, anyway, to make spacers for Marvic wheel to go on Bike #2.

Loosened top clamp pinch bolts and RS cap came off fairly easy.

The left cap not so lucky.

Was very hard to unseat , and still hard to turn for about 4 revolutions.

Had to use a 1/2 inch impact with a 6 point socket.

I even turned the mouth of the socket flat to take out the bevel for max grip.

From the pictures you can see thread either cross threaded from factory or thread seized.

Thought it was a bit unusual that the cable tie was missing on that side, though # 1 bike has it.

May have been an omen of things to come.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Pics in 2nd post due to length of rant is 1st post.

 

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Discussion Starter #3


Picked some of the cap material from the tube with a dental pick.

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wow! Any chance your dealer will take care of you? I'd hope so especially since you got two bikes! Good luck with it.

Daniel


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Hopefully.

I don't know if fork fluid is added by factory or dealer.

Had 16 oz in the left fork and 14 oz in the right fork.

Don't know how long it would take to get from Yamaha , or find a wrecked bike being parted out.
 

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Personally, I would Never add anti-seize before putting the fork cap back on......too much risk of contamination into the fork oil. Having said that, the left fork doesn't really do much in the way of "valving", but it's still a bad practice in my opinion.

Hopefully, your dealer will take care of that. The proper level of fork fluid is approx. 147mm from the top, with the fork fully compressed......and the bike comes from the factory with the forks fully assembled. This is an area that the dealer should never have to work on/address/assemble on a new bike. It was obviously cross threaded from the factory and Yamaha should stand behind it. A new left fork complete assembly is in the $450 range..MSRP.
 

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Personally, I would Never add anti-seize before putting the fork cap back on......too much risk of contamination into the fork oil. Having said that, the left fork doesn't really do much in the way of "valving", but it's still a bad practice in my opinion.

Hopefully, your dealer will take care of that. The proper level of fork fluid is approx. 147mm from the top, with the fork fully compressed......and the bike comes from the factory with the forks fully assembled. This is an area that the dealer should never have to work on/address/assemble on a new bike. It was obviously cross threaded from the factory and Yamaha should stand behind it. A new left fork complete assembly is in the $450 range..MSRP.

If you're adverse to anti-seizing compound a normal heavy lubricant will work in a pinch. It is normal good mechanical engineering practice to have the fastener and mating part be of different hardnesses so galling isn't an issue. But with lightweight construction this is not always practical.
 

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Wow that's very unusual to see that. I agree though that it appears the factory did it. That doesn't happen just un loosening a fork cap unless Yamaha cross threaded it a bit first.
 

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Could an over torque at the factory do it?
No because ALL the threads would be damaged. His pics showed the first 3 threads damaged. That's from cross threading at the factory.
 

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No because ALL the threads would be damaged. His pics showed the first 3 threads damaged. That's from cross threading at the factory.
Given most modern manufacturing processes use computer controlled torque tools the instance of cross threading is almost eliminated because the torque profile would be almost absurd. IMHO this sure looks like galling.

"Galling is a form of wear caused by adhesion between sliding surfaces. When a material galls, some of it is pulled with the contacting surface, especially if there is a large amount of force compressing the surfaces together. Galling is caused by a combination of friction and adhesion between the surfaces, followed by slipping and tearing of crystal structure beneath the surface. This will generally leave some material stuck or even friction welded to the adjacent surface, while the galled material may appear gouged with balled-up or torn lumps of material stuck to its surface.





Galling is most commonly found in metal surfaces that are in sliding contact with each other. It is especially common where there is inadequate lubrication between the surfaces. However, certain metals will generally be more prone to galling, due to the atomic structure of their crystals. For example, aluminum is a metal which will gall very easily, whereas annealed (softened) steel is slightly more resistant to galling. Steel that is fully hardened is very resistant to galling."

Here is an example of galling.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ordered fork the day this thread started.

Would likely take forever to get here, so I was able to "fix" till cap comes in.

The tube is harder material than the cap, so threads may be ok, for now.

Was going to make a steel thread chaser, but found a simpler way to clean threads.

Got a 8 by 1 mm tap and used it as a scraping tool.

Fork is a 1 mm pitch thread.

Didn't have a thread file, and one wouldn't work inside the tube , anyway.

Took awhile using the tap sideways, scraping, contact cleaner, blow off with air, and repeat.

Used the same tap to partially restore / clean the remaining thread on the cap.

Got it to the point where it easily screws in by hand to the o ring, then held socket to seating.

Will assemble with a light film of grease till new fork cap comes in.

Still more than 2/3rds the threads left, which should be ok, for now.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Did the dealer take care of it or did they make you pay for it? Sounds like a really good temp fix.

Daniel
They wanted me to bring the whole bike and leave it.

I ordered the part and supposedly getting at cost.

I don't have time for a lot of BS.

I'll be riding it down to the scales, tomorrow, with the Graves pipe.
 

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They wanted you to bring the bike in and leave it was so that they could have the Yamaha Service Representative look at it and get a ruling so that they could get a warranty claim paid on it. Horseshit if you ask me. It becomes a he did, she did, at that point. I have more experience than all of the techs at my local shop put together, and I hate to ever have them put a wrench on my bikes. I would have done the same thing that you did and order the parts asking for some help. It is a sad state of affairs that the motorcycle dealer system has ended up becoming.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You're right about the he said / she said aspect.

They may say I cross threaded it, and I have only worked on bikes over 40 years and used to have a shop.

I can understand their policy, though I would think the pictures would be adequate .

Last time I took anything to a dealer was a Quad to get maintenance service, since I didn't want to deal with it.

When it came back, it was obvious they didn't do half of what I was charged for.

Example, mud not disturbed in the slightest around the valve covers as they were never removed to adjust valves.
 
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