Yamaha FZ-09 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys. I messed up. You guys provided me so much help last time and am hoping for the same. I’m in the process of going with the TST tail light. In the process of reconnecting the battery, my idiot self did a reverse polarity and got a huge spark. Took me a fricken hour to realize I had the poles reversed. Popped the 50 amp fuse and a small 7.5 amp fuse. Replaced both, corrected my polarity mistake and still nothing. I turn the key on and no lights. Nothing. I still have not wired in the license plate light nor the turn signal part of the brake light. Ideas please, please, please. Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
A tip for future maintenance: When disconnecting the battery, only the positive post needs to be pulled. That way, you can't reverse the poles upon reconnect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for your help. Ended up buying another 50 amp main fuse and it worked. I did check that right front panel fuse bank. They were good. CEL not on and hopefully is does not come on, but I’ll keep an eye out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Quick question. When I apply the front brakes, the front running lights dim down . Any idea!s?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
the front running lights dim down .
Hmm...

1. Consult with TST industries if you "must" have a resistor in line with your lights.

2. You left the poles reversed for an hour, it is possible that some wiring got melted somewhere and now, when applying brakes, there is cross talk between the melted wire insulation causing extra draw of power.

I am by no means a wiring or electricity expert. But I do tech support for heavy electronics machines. I am not an expert on the use of a volt meter, but I think you will either have to learn some good basics of a volt meter or take it to someone who can diagnose this.
 
  • Like
Reactions: baba booey

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
Hmm...

1. Consult with TST industries if you "must" have a resistor in line with your lights.

2. You left the poles reversed for an hour, it is possible that some wiring got melted somewhere and now, when applying brakes, there is cross talk between the melted wire insulation causing extra draw of power.

I am by no means a wiring or electricity expert. But I do tech support for heavy electronics machines. I am not an expert on the use of a volt meter, but I think you will either have to learn some good basics of a volt meter or take it to someone who can diagnose this.
1) I wouldn't think so.

2) Would have zero affect on the harness. Fuses are there to protect from this situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
Quick question. When I apply the front brakes, the front running lights dim down . Any idea!s?
What do you mean by dim down? If you mean you can't see as far, it's because of front end dive, a natural part of using the front brake. The point of aim of your headlight will come closer to your front wheel.

Otherwise, I can't think of anything that would cause a dimming of your lights because of hitting the brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
What do you mean by dim down? If you mean you can't see as far, it's because of front end dive, a natural part of using the front brake. The point of aim of your headlight will come closer to your front wheel.

Otherwise, I can't think of anything that would cause a dimming of your lights because of hitting the brakes.
The front running lights will dim when I squeeze the brake lever. This is with me off the bike and not riding it. Once I let go of the brake lever they brighten up again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
2) Would have zero affect on the harness. Fuses are there to protect from this situation.
True, but not 100% fail safe. Specially in a battery pole reversal scenario. If fuses where bullet proof, bikes would never have wiring loom issues, only fuse replacements. But as we all know... The key here is battery pole reversal. Throws everything out the window. Even newbie LazyRider knows this! 😁 😎 :geek: 🤦‍♂️
 
  • Like
Reactions: baba booey

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I spoke with TST today. Side note: great communication. It appears that their rear tail light does not play well with front running lights. They sell a separate "adapter" for their front lights if one wants to use them for both turn signals AND running lights.

As a test, I'm going to return the set up to its previous known configuration and see if the front running lights behave normally. I feel this would be a good test to see if I really screwed the pooch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I spoke with TST today. Side note: great communication. It appears that their rear tail light does not play well with front running lights. They sell a separate "adapter" for their front lights if one wants to use them for both turn signals AND running lights.

As a test, I'm going to return the set up to its previous known configuration and see if the front running lights behave normally. I feel this would be a good test to see if I really screwed the pooch.
I did return it to "stock" configuration and it fortunately behaved properly. I am happy the 50 amp fuse did the job my brain did not. LOL.

Thanks again for your help. Out of all the forums I've been a part of over the years, this has been one of the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
Hmm...

1. Consult with TST industries if you "must" have a resistor in line with your lights.

2. You left the poles reversed for an hour, it is possible that some wiring got melted somewhere and now, when applying brakes, there is cross talk between the melted wire insulation causing extra draw of power.

I am by no means a wiring or electricity expert. But I do tech support for heavy electronics machines. I am not an expert on the use of a volt meter, but I think you will either have to learn some good basics of a volt meter or take it to someone who can diagnose this.
"2. You left the poles reversed for an hour," No, the fuse disconnected it for him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
No, the fuse disconnected it for him.
My memory might be playing tricks on me... but if I recall my own experience with reversing polarity on my own bike, the 50amp fuse does not isolate the battery 100%. I remember what sounded like the ABS system going bananas even after the fuse had blown. So there may be some circuits still live.

Someone with better knowledge can chime in, maybe?
 
  • Like
Reactions: baba booey

·
Registered
2016 XSR900 60th Anniv. Edition
Joined
·
2,005 Posts
A tip for future maintenance: When disconnecting the battery, only the positive post needs to be pulled. That way, you can't reverse the poles upon reconnect.
“Scratch that, reverse it!”
- Willy Wonka

I just caught this thread and wanted to point out that you don’t want to have just the ground attached to a battery. You always disconnect the negative first, and connect the positive first. I can’t remember exactly why that is (where’s gmtech when you need him!), but I believe it’s something to do with sparks flying or shorting the battery if the wrench you’re using on the positive lead happens to touch any grounded piece of the chassis while the negative cable is still attached.

Just remember, if there’s one cable connected at any given time, you positively want it to be the positive.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top