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2022 MT-09 SP
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Wanted to update this thread because it seems spring rates might have changed for 2022 SPs; specifically, it would appear that the rear spring is 5 N-m softer, while the front spring is somewhat stiffer.

I weigh 145 pounds (without gear) and find the best preload settings are minimum at both ends. At minimum preloads, I get the following sag settings:
  • front
    • 24 mm static sag
    • 40 mm rider sag
  • rear
    • 5 mm static sag
    • 25 mm rider sag.
Regarding the rear spring rate, I see others in this thread report their springs are 95 N-m. Mine is marked 01092-29/90, which corresponds to a 90 N-m spring. Of course, that the 2022 spring is softer is consistent with me getting a bit of static sag, while owners of earlier years report none.

Regarding the front springs, I haven't opened up the forks, but it's interesting that I get barely enough sag at minimum preload, while others found the stock fork springs too soft.

It kinda seems like Yamaha quietly stiffened the front springs and softened the rear spring for 2022, bringing them into better balance. I'll bet the spring rates would be great at both ends for a rider in the 180 pound range. As for me, I'll likely live with the fork springs, but move to an 80 N-m spring for the rear.

Thoughts?
 

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Yes, I tried to set sag with all damping backed off, and found my sag numbers were far greater than they should have been.
I'm struggling to understand how this could be true. Changing the damping settings should only affect the rate at which the bike settles to its final height, not its final height itself, right?

I can imagine how damping rates might interact with "stiction" to cause the bike to settle higher or lower when rising or falling, but sag should be measured twice (once rising and once falling), then averaged, so I wouldn't think damping would affect the averaged sag readings.

At any rate, surely there's no harm in checking you sag after settling on damping settings, so maybe the issue is academic.
 

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Regarding the rear spring rate, I see others in this thread report their springs are 95 N-m. Mine is marked 01092-29/90, which corresponds to a 90 N-m spring. Of course, that the 2022 spring is softer is consistent with me getting a bit of static sag, while owners of earlier years report none.
My 2021 SP has the 01092-29/90 rear spring as well. I can barely get 5mm static with preload all the way out.
 

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My 2021 SP has the 01092-29/90 rear spring as well. I can barely get 5mm static with preload all the way out.
To get any static sag, you have to mess with the compression, rebound, as well as the preload on the rear shock. It's actually insane.

I was able to get the rear suspension pretty comfortable for street use but, I'm still figuring out the front end.
 

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Interesting . . . perhaps the spring was changed during the 2021 model year from 95 K-m to 90 K-m?
Nah, the 95 springs are the stock rate for the previous gen SP's, and are the standard spring rate for any of the off the shelf Ohlins shocks (YA335/535) for previous gen bikes.
Current SP has always been 90. And if you look at the Ohlins shocks available for the current 09's (YA569/570), they ship with 90 springs.
I can't remember where I saw it now, but the shock linkage rate on the current bikes is slightly lower than on previous gens. So that at least partially negates the lower spring rate.
Very very little or no static sag with the adjuster set at min preload means the hydraulic preload assembly was installed with too much preload on the spring. Ideally the assembly should be moved up a few mm.

The parts fiche says no suspension differences between '21 and '22. Your front end doesn't move at all when you sit on the bike?
 

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To get any static sag, you have to mess with the compression, rebound, as well as the preload on the rear shock. It's actually insane.

I was able to get the rear suspension pretty comfortable for street use but, I'm still figuring out the front end.
How exactly does compression and rebound affect static sag? I messed with both and static remained constant.
 

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The parts fiche says no suspension differences between '21 and '22. Your front end doesn't move at all when you sit on the bike?
Seems likely 21s and 22s are indeed the same. I relied on SLM13's report that he saw a 95 K-M spring on a 21 SP.

Not sure I understand your question about the front end not moving when I sit on the bike. At minimum preload I get 24 mm static sag at the front, which increases to 40 mm when I sit on the bike.
 

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How exactly does compression and rebound affect static sag? I messed with both and static remained constant.
My experience is the same. Indeed, in that the compression and rebound damping adjusters only affect the rate at which the shock/fork pistons, it seems like they shouldn't affect sag, which should be determined entirely by springs and preload.
 

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And I tried to just adjust static with moving the preload but I got nothing.
On the rear? That seems consistent with many others' experiences; it seems either the spring is too stiff or the "installed" preload is too much, so our bikes have little or no static sag. I get 5 mm, which ain't much, and I don't see others reporting any more.
 

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Not sure I understand your question about the front end not moving when I sit on the bike. At minimum preload I get 24 mm static sag at the front, which increases to 40 mm when I sit on the bike.
Ah, I misread your original post, thought you'd said you barely had any sag at the front. Weekend brain fart lol

I think your sag numbers are okay for the street. Other riders are getting more sag probably because they weigh more, but put a zip tie on the slider and do some hard braking and you'll prolly use up all of the travel. Just for reference, on my first gen 09 I had .85 fork springs and they were just about right - even after very hard braking, there was still 1/4 of the travel left. And (at the time) I weighed 145 nekkid, so 160ish fully geared up, about the same as you.

I remember watching a ride review video of an SP and they did a hard stop from 60ish and at the end the fork was completely bottomed out.

I relied on SLM13's report that he saw a 95 K-M spring on a 21 SP.
Hmmm....the shock part number for Euro spec 21 SP's is different than the U.S. spec. So I guess it's possible that it could be a stiffer spring on theirs.
 

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Suspension settings are super simple, but I see people make WAY too big of a deal over it all the time.

Forget all about how many "clicks" someone else likes. It means nothing. Set your sag first. If you're unwilling to set your sag, which often means buying different springs, then forget about fiddling with clickers. Trying to use damping to overcome improper spring rates is impossible.

Set your sag. Then go ride. If you're bottoming out, add compression damping. If you're bucking, add rebound. Done.
 

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Ah, I misread your original post, thought you'd said you barely had any sag at the front. Weekend brain fart lol

I think your sag numbers are okay for the street. Other riders are getting more sag probably because they weigh more, but put a zip tie on the slider and do some hard braking and you'll prolly use up all of the travel. Just for reference, on my first gen 09 I had .85 fork springs and they were just about right - even after very hard braking, there was still 1/4 of the travel left. And (at the time) I weighed 145 nekkid, so 160ish fully geared up, about the same as you.

I remember watching a ride review video of an SP and they did a hard stop from 60ish and at the end the fork was completely bottomed out.



Hmmm....the shock part number for Euro spec 21 SP's is different than the U.S. spec. So I guess it's possible that it could be a stiffer spring on theirs.
The MT09 SP '21 model was on display in an Italian shop just a few weeks before it was officially scheduled to arrive on the market and I went there on purpouse to check the bike and in particular the suspensions. The spring was 95 for sure (I had already swapped the 95 for 90 on my Ohlins YA535 shock for my MT09 '16 and I was curious to check out if they changed the shock or at least the spring rate). I didn't notice that the shock - despite the fact to look like the YA535 was just a little different (another model, longer for a few mm).
I should pick up the rear to see if there was any static, right in front of the crowd and the shop's owner ... :D

I watched a video on Youtube where my suspension guy said that sometimes spring rates are different in different countries, but I don't know if this is the case ...
 

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I'm struggling to understand how this could be true. Changing the damping settings should only affect the rate at which the bike settles to its final height, not its final height itself, right?

I can imagine how damping rates might interact with "stiction" to cause the bike to settle higher or lower when rising or falling, but sag should be measured twice (once rising and once falling), then averaged, so I wouldn't think damping would affect the averaged sag readings.

At any rate, surely there's no harm in checking you sag after settling on damping settings, so maybe the issue is academic.
Yes, it's correct. I checked and rechecked the recheck. The Ohlins/Nitron Guru who supplied the cartridges and shock confirmed it too. He always checks sag with damping at normal settings.
 

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How exactly does compression and rebound affect static sag? I messed with both and static remained constant.
Damping will not change sag if you just twiddle the adjusters with the bike on a stand. But when you are checking sag, loading/unloading the suspension, it does affect the measurements.
 
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I have to disagree. The damping circuit can't support the weight of the bike in any way. It'd be like removing a shock absorber from a car and worrying about the vehicle collapsing. The springs alone hold the car up, the shocks just dampen their movements. Preload position and spring rate are the only things that affect sag measurements. Well, there's stiction, but you don't use preload or spring rates to overcome stiction. It's an issue of it's own. If you have stiction issues it'll show up in your sag measurements, but damping circuits are completely separate from controls sag.
 

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I have to disagree. The damping circuit can't support the weight of the bike in any way. It'd be like removing a shock absorber from a car and worrying about the vehicle collapsing. The springs alone hold the car up, the shocks just dampen their movements. Preload position and spring rate are the only things that affect sag measurements. Well, there's stiction, but you don't use preload or spring rates to overcome stiction. It's an issue of it's own. If you have stiction issues it'll show up in your sag measurements, but damping circuits are completely separate from controls sag.
Well, here's the video I saw
When Dave removes all the preload he barely gets any static sag on the SP with decently warm oil as people had been riding it around a track that whole day.

And then he goes to the other adjusters to see if he can create any static sag.

You can disagree all you want, but do you even have a '21+ SP? I saw you posted a '16 FZ09 that you had just got a few months ago. Did you change out the suspension? Did you trade it in for an SP?

I feel like you are just saying stuff to say stuff.
 

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The physics of how suspension works has nothing to do with the make, model or year of the bike. They all work the same.

I'm just a pleb. I'm not a big boi with a SP 💪 The damping on the hallowed SP 💪 works exactly like the damping on every other thing that has damping on it.

Dave Moss is the last guy I'd use for proof in any type of suspension discussion. That silver tongue makes his money off tuning suspension while clearly offering no suspension tuning services. All he does is finger the external adjustments. Go to his site, he offers no tuning services. Revalve? Forget about it, he doesn't even sell springs.

Dave's been proven to "affect" results to put on a good show before.

You want to talk to a real suspension guy? Ring up the guys at Stoltec or Ktech. Leave Dave Moss to his YouTube videos where he scares people's money in to his pocket.
 

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The physics of how suspension works has nothing to do with the make, model or year of the bike. They all work the same.

I'm just a pleb. I'm not a big boi with a SP 💪 The damping on the hallowed SP 💪 works exactly like the damping on every other thing that has damping on it.

Dave Moss is the last guy I'd use for proof in any type of suspension discussion. That silver tongue makes his money off tuning suspension while clearly offering no suspension tuning services. All he does is finger the external adjustments. Go to his site, he offers no tuning services. Revalve? Forget about it, he doesn't even sell springs.

Dave's been proven to "affect" results to put on a good show before.

You want to talk to a real suspension guy? Ring up the guys at Stoltec or Ktech. Leave Dave Moss to his YouTube videos where he scares people's money in to his pocket.
So you're just saying stuff.
 
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