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Damn; I didn't like that last statement one bit. But could you please elaborate on how the road was? I heard that first on this Neevesy review video:
Go to 5:10. But he said that only on bumpy roads, and I assumed fast as hell too. Maybe not??? Then he reviewed the competition starting at 8:00, and gave the SP 5*. But said the 890R had the best front end (and brakes). I'm really torn if the 890R is the better bike for aggressive cornering riders like me, even though it might be less reliable, and quite a bit more expensive (when fitted with tech pack and cruise).

At any rate, apparently nobody has this bike (other than like 2 lucky recipients in the west coast), and won't have it for a while, so not sure what I'll do, once I can buy the trailer I need (in about 2 months). I hope a proper comparison video pops up soon, so I can make a more educated decision, since I'll have to buy blindly (nobody offers test rides around here).
yes, just like the MCN guy said. I did not pay attention to the road, so I can't say how it was, I should have stopped maybe; the next time it happens, I'll check. the strange thing is that i was not "fast as hell", I just opened the throttle but in a smooth way. Not scary but not a good feeling either. I had tried the duke 790 some months ago, and it is beautiful too. found that when the electronics kicks in to prevent anti-wheelie, it is maybe too abrupt, I was thinking "what the hell is happening? did i break anything" Then, since there is not much KTM assistance here, I opted for Yamaha (in general, for non-japanese bike, it is not easy to find good mechs where I live and since I'm not good at maintenance, this concerns me a lot). Very happy so far, anyway. For any questions, feel free to ask, I'm not the best biker out there but can provide feedback. :)
 

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Thank you very much. Yeah, when you mentioned you weren't going that fast, it concerned me, since I'd probably ride at least at the same pace you do, and if I get a wobble like that, limiting my enjoyment, I'd be extremely disappointed. It has only happened to me on a BMW K1200RS, and sold it (at a great loss) because of that. It wasn't dangerous indeed, BUT I couldn't ride any faster, and I wasn't going that fast either. It was like a weave, meaning a back and forth slight motion side to side, like riding waves. Ha ha. And it wasn't my inputs, since it was doing it with zero pressure on the bars. May I ask what tire pressures (cold) you're using? And approximately how much lean angle you're using when it happens? Like close to dragging, halfway, etc. Thanks brother; greatly appreciate your input.
 

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>back and forth slight motion side to side <<
yes, something like that.

I left the factory tire pressure, 2.5 2.9. I was halfway leaning, not dragging at all.
strange thing is, I made other turns at greater speed and more leaned but did not experience that feeling, so who knows why it started. with the FZ8 that had never happened, but it was so heavy.
in your case I would not buy it blindly. Sad u can't test it, here it's plenty of dealers with test bikes. (The 890R instead was not possbile to test it, b/c they had just 1 model)
in my case, I would buy it again without problem, I feel like I was born again and forgot immediately all the issues I had with my previous bike. :)
 

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I left the factory tire pressure, 2.5 2.9.
That’s the maximum pressure rating on these tires, but it’s too much for solo sport riding.

You should run your tires around 2.2 - 2.5 (32-36 psi), but no more, unless you have a passenger and/or luggage.
 

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That’s the maximum pressure rating on these tires, but it’s too much for solo sport riding.

You should run your tires around 2.2 - 2.5 (32-36 psi), but no more, unless you have a passenger and/or luggage.
Ok, that's what I read in the manual and it does not mention it as max value
Anyway I left everything as it was when I took it from the dealer, I will check tomorrow morning
On the FZ8 I had 2.3 2.5
 

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Yes. The theory is that they put that in the manual to cover themselves legally, but in reality it’s just way too much pressure, and your bike tends to skate around. Trust me.

This is always a hot topic for debate, just like engine oil, but try it and you’ll see... 😉
 

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Just going to throw this here. Kevin Cameron is an absolute gem when it comes to motorcycle wisdom and knowledge.
(Almost) Everything You Need To Know About Motorcycle Tire Pressures | Cycle World

If you want to kill your free time for several days check out his backlog of articles. All really good stuff: Kevin Cameron | Cycle World
His youtube series is great, too: Ask Kevin Cameron - YouTube

/edit - FWIW, the Pirelli Angel GTs on my Duc Scrambler performed the best when inflated to the recommended PSI in the owner's manual. Any softer and feedback got mushy, bike didn't want to lean in as well... Engineers generally know what they're talking about, I don't think the lawyers influence as much as we would think (which I have!). The company after all is selling a 400lb, 115HP rocket to put under your crotch.
 

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There is credence to dropping the PSI, at least at the track. Bridgestone's recommended cold PSI for the S22 tire (on the '21 MT-09) is 30 front / 26 rear (WTF... that's far from the recommended 36/42, especially on the rear...). It comes with this caveat:

Use of HYPERSPORT patterns on track. Reminder: “Street Use” tires do not have the same optimum operating temperature as racing tires (Operating temperature is lower). Therefore it is important to adapt tire pressure accordingly. HYPERSPORT tires are not designed for pure track use only and therefore it may only be appropriate for beginners to intermediate experienced riders. The recommended pressures are for track use only. If you are using these tires on the road, refer to the vehicle manufacturer’s recommendation.
But this assumes you're going to be pushing your tires HARD, which increases the temperature and pressure more than normal. So likely not ideal for standard speed, short, wet, or cold weather riding. Lowering the pressure will also decrease the life of your tires, though by how much I couldn't say.

Track-Day-Air-Pressure-Chart-May-2020-FINAL.pdf (bridgestonemotorcycletires.com)
 

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Kevin's recap of the recent Jerez MotoGP race has some good info about tires, too, particularly about tire stiffness (which can be influenced by tire pressure). There's more in the article beyond the quote below.

Rossi, too, sounded as though he had been reminded of his corporate responsibilities. On Friday, he had said, “I lack grip on the rear; the tire slides too much. In recent years I have suffered from this problem, especially since the tires have become so soft [in carcass construction], while in my career I have always preferred hard [carcass construction] tires.”

After the race, he backpedaled. “I don’t like talking about tires, saying that they are too soft for me,” Rossi said, “because they are the same for everyone, and if you want to race in MotoGP you have to adapt.”

The fact is that they are not the same for everyone. Back in 2008 I spoke separately to then-teammates Colin Edwards II and Rossi about their tire preferences. At the time I was interested in whether or not Edwards, ostensibly hired to test tires for Rossi, required the same characteristics in tires as his teammate.

First, however, we must make a clear distinction between the hardness or softness of the tread rubber and the stiffness or softness of the tire’s carcass construction. A tire’s carcass is a composite construction made of layers (plies) of unidirectional high-strength fabric, bonded together and embedded in rubber. Depending on the nature of the under-tread stiffening belts and the ply angle used in its construction, the carcass can be given a range of stiffnesses. Street tires are often given a very forgiving but lower-performing flexible belt with a zero angle between its wound-on fibers and the central plane of the tire. Racing tires are more often given two or more under-tread belt plies, laid on in a range of angles from 30 degrees to the maximally stiff 22.5 degrees. The stiffer the belt, the more it behaves like a tank’s track, which stiffly resists any sideways flex.

The remarks of the two riders explain a lot. Edwards has always ridden a point-and-shoot style: Late, hard braking down to a low apex speed, followed by rapid turning and then by maximum acceleration to recover the speed lost at the apex. The strong point of this style is that by getting the turning done early, in a limited zone, the rest of the turn can be reserved as a dragstrip in order to attain a high exit speed. Because the tire is maximally stressed only in the zone of rapid turning, this style can be easier on tires than the corner-speed style, which continuously subjects the tire to peak edge grip all the way through long sweeping turns.

Edwards said that he needed a very flexible tire carcass to lay down a tread footprint of maximum area and give the traction needed for speed recovery during corner exit.
Rossi said he wanted a stiff carcass that could establish and stably maintain high-side grip to allow him to corner at the highest possible speed.
When I asked Rossi what happened when he rode Edwards’ kind of tire, he said, “The bike jumps sideways.”
.
Jack Miller Wins in Jerez | Cycle World
 

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Just going to throw this here. Kevin Cameron is an absolute gem when it comes to motorcycle wisdom and knowledge.
(Almost) Everything You Need To Know About Motorcycle Tire Pressures | Cycle World
Kevin’s great, but I didn’t see anything in that article that refutes what I suggested above. He talks about ranges of pressure, and that’s what it comes down to. In this case, 42 psi is the high end, suitable for the maximum load on the bike. Does it make sense to use the same pressure when the bike has just on person aboard?

FWIW, the Pirelli Angel GTs on my Duc Scrambler performed the best when inflated to the recommended PSI in the owner's manual.
If that works for you, that’s great. The Bridgestones they put on the MT don’t like that high pressure. They just don’t. And none of the sport bike tires I’ve ever used like it. And if you were experiencing a weave like @gianpaolof, and had ruled out suspension setup and riding technique, I would tell you the same thing. Lower the pressure.

Engineers generally know what they're talking about, I don't think the lawyers influence as much as we would think (which I have!). The company after all is selling a 400lb, 115HP rocket to put under your crotch.
Oh, you can be absolutely sure the lawyers are are involved! Why do you think the manual tells you not to consume battery acid? 🤪

As Kevin Cameron noted in that article, they recommend 40 psi for 1000 lb. touring bikes. Why would a 400 lb. crotch rocket need even more?
 

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Oh, I'm not refuting your suggestion. I'm just adding additional information to take into consideration as one situation isn't necessarily like another (that's what I was getting at with my Angel GT experience, I did not state my experience would apply to others). It's good to understand why changes are needed and how they can affect the bike. That way folks can better experiment and not just take specific numbers as canon without understanding them.

One of the points I think Kevin makes is that tires can have different pressure requirements (even if they're the same size or have different loads) due to the construction of the tire (stiffer side walls, weaved vs straight belts, surface hardness, etc... Also, is it known for certain that manufacturers recommend the max pressure, or could it be an average / median that would be a best fit for most riders? I'm asking because I don't know.

I 100% agree that the numbers provided by the manufacturer are not ideal for every situation. Like you mentioned, things like rider weight, weight of mods and luggage, tire construction, etc all change pressure requirements.

That good to know about the Bridgestone's liking lower pressure. I'll definitely give that a shot on my bike. I've noticed on a couple occasions the tire feels "floaty" on a high speed curved freeway ramp with rain grooves. Perhaps a couple PSI lower will help get rid of that.

Right after Kevin talks about a 1000lb touring bike he states: "Keep a good tire pressure gauge, know your recommended pressures, and see to it that they are maintained." :p(But don't take that as canon either!)
 

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One of the minor but nice touches on my 2020 SP was the MT-09 SP logo decal on each wheel rim. Does the 2021 have the same? TIA...

165279
 
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You should run your tires around 2.2 - 2.5 (32-36 psi), but no more, unless you have a passenger and/or luggage.
I fully agree... unless you're talking about a 300-lb rider. Ha ha. I use 33F/36R cold for my 165 weight (plus gear); it's the best compromise between proper grip for aggressive cornering, and still great tire life. For anybody with even a modicum of mechanical common sense, recommending 36F/42R (cold) pressures for both a fully loaded motorcycle, as well as a solo rider, makes no freaking sense indeed. But to each his own, of course :).
 

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ask what tire pressures (cold) you're using? And approximately how much lean angle you're using when it happens? Like close to dragging, halfway, etc. Thanks brother; greatly appreciate your input.
hello
I have to fix my prev message: pressure of my tires is (and was since the 1st day) 2.3 2.5
The weaving happened again on sunday, while entering the highway, so while opening the throttle, but it was almost
imperceptible. In the point the road has some disconnection, so I guess the front lightened up a bit and the acceleration caused the shaking? I dont know. Anyway, after that I went up to the hills, on a very twisty road, and the ride was beautiful. Again, found the bike very easy to lean and very precise in the turn; though the road had some irregularities, never had any problem on brakes, throttle, nothing. Simply a great bike.
Cheers
 

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That's good to hear, and thanks a lot for that update. It's probably the aggressive steering geometry IMO. Have you tried raising the rear preload, to see if that helps? Give it a try. Another possible solution would be to adjust the bars forward a little (they're adjustable, right?), to put a bit more weight on the front tire. Anyway, wanted to log back in one last time to thank you for posting the truth about your bike. If I end up buying the SP, would look for another more friendly forum. And communicate with you via PM if you're not there. Enjoy your bike :). Take care.
 
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