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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

I will be moving from Detroit, MI to Chandler/Gilbert AZ in early July. I have already sold my last bike (cbr 600) and intend on picking up a FZ when I get settled in down south.

I was hoping those of you in the metro Phoenix area could supply a bit of help and advice as I come closer to making this move. First thing is the heat. This winter I saw 100 inches of snow, -17F temps -36F windchills and more ice than you can probably imagine if you have spent your life in Arizona. With this in mind, I have no idea how to handle the heat when I get down there. Are there any must have items for riding or living when it gets past 100F? I have very little experience with triple digits and can only imagine how hot a seat would be after sitting in a parking lot at work all day. Is there a good technique to keep your bum from melting when getting on? Are evaporation cooling vests necessary? Are you laughing because I think 100 is ungodly hot?

What about dealers? Any quick suggestions on East valley dealers? I will probably derp through the big OTD thread, but OTD numbers don't show the customer experience at a dealer.

Last question I have is about lane splitting. I do my research, I know there was a bill that passed the legislative branch a couple years back to allow it on a trial basis. It got vetoed primarily for implementation reasons. But the fact that it got that far with glaring implementation issues has me thinking it probably isn't taken as seriously as it is in the mid-west. What are your observations on the practice of filtering in Maricopa?

Thanks for any answers guys. I look forward to riding or meeting with some of you, riding to the grand canyon (route 89 looks like fun), and getting in-n-out burgers.
 

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If you are sure you want an 09 you might put a deposit down on one in AZ before you move, in case the supply is tight.
 

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Been to AZ few time and really enjoy it. I have a friend of mine who live in Scottsdale. Very nice there... I never been there at peak of summer but I remember it get hot as hell! But not sticky humid like Florida. Nose dry all the time but you should get use to it.

Much easier to cool yourself down with a cold brew than shoveling 18" of snow! LOL (I'm from Montreal... I know!)
 

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I have visited Gilbert a couple times this year. Most the year is perfect for an Alaskan guy. Those few months of mid summer are a bit warm for me. Two words. Air conditioning.
 

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With the dry heat you might not realize how much water you are losing, so be careful to keep hydrated. Dehydration doesn't improve riding ability.
 

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I live along the Gulf Coast in an extremely hot and humid environment. I visited Arizona in the peak of the summer when it was 110 degrees, but the dry heat doesn't feel nearly as hot as the humid heat along the coast. You can always bring a small towel to place over the seat to keep the heat down when you park the bike outside all day, but if you are wearing proper (thick) riding pants a hot seat won't be all that noticeable. As mentioned, the key to dealing with heat is staying hydrated. For longer rides, I wear a Camelback and put ice in it to keep the water and my core cool. In the end, you will likely be covered in sweat no matter what you do when riding in triple digit temps, but you'll be fine if you stay hydrated. My favorite time to ride is during the winter when all of the northerners would normally be putting their bikes into hibernation!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Been to AZ few time and really enjoy it. I have a friend of mine who live in Scottsdale. Very nice there... I never been there at peak of summer but I remember it get hot as hell! But not sticky humid like Florida. Nose dry all the time but you should get use to it.

Much easier to cool yourself down with a cold brew than shoveling 18" of snow! LOL (I'm from Montreal... I know!)
I'm sure thats part is much easier. However in Detroit you can always add another layer and be warm, I'd get arrested for removing layers to stay cool!

I live along the Gulf Coast in an extremely hot and humid environment. I visited Arizona in the peak of the summer when it was 110 degrees, but the dry heat doesn't feel nearly as hot as the humid heat along the coast. You can always bring a small towel to place over the seat to keep the heat down when you park the bike outside all day, but if you are wearing proper (thick) riding pants a hot seat won't be all that noticeable. As mentioned, the key to dealing with heat is staying hydrated. For longer rides, I wear a Camelback and put ice in it to keep the water and my core cool. In the end, you will likely be covered in sweat no matter what you do when riding in triple digit temps, but you'll be fine if you stay hydrated. My favorite time to ride is during the winter when all of the northerners would normally be putting their bikes into hibernation!
Good tip on the cloth, as long as it stays on the bike. Camelback sounds like a good tip also. Which one do you use?

If you are sure you want an 09 you might put a deposit down on one in AZ before you move, in case the supply is tight.
I have thought about doing this, but by the time I move and get settled the 07 will be out. With my limited riding experience the 07 is something that I am taking very seriously. The difference in insurance will likely be the deciding factor (23, 1 speeding ticket (car), no at fault accidents). That and I want to take a MSF course before buying, again for safety/insurance purposes. In Indiana (born, raised, Purdue) I didn't bother with MSF, just rode on the learners permit. I want to keep everything above board from now on.
 

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Good tip on the cloth, as long as it stays on the bike. Camelback sounds like a good tip also. Which one do you use?
You could tuck the edges of the cloth under the seat to keep it in place, but again I don't really worry about it because my slightly warm butt through my riding pants is forgotten about quickly when the rest of my body is also hot. I have a camelbak rogue which also has a small pocket for carrying extra stuff if needed.
 

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I heard the morning commutes to work are like this....



I kid, I kid :cool:
 
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The heat will kick your arse big time the first few summers. Always caryy water man, always. Ride with a hydration bladder backpack, I even used freeze mine at night and let it thaw while I was riding. It didn't take long to thaw but kept cold.

Crime is kinda high, but not more so then most other cities. Phoenix is the 2nd leading city in the world for kidnappings, but I never saw any of that, cept for on the news.

Stay outta jail. They have this phucked up outdoor tent city jail in 115 degree heat. Make the guys eat baloney sandwiches and wear pink jumpsuits. I never went to jail but know people who did and they really freakin hated it. I guess it is a good determent as people really don't wanna go back to Jail. Scottsdale is a good place to live. Lots of beautiful women.

Ge a dirtbike. There are so many freakin awesome trails to ride in the winter. Just don't go too far south in the desert, if ya know what I mean.
 

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I lived in the southern California desert for 13 years, basically the same thing as Phoenix with highs in the summer up to about 120-125 and very very low humidity.

I have also ridden through Phoenix at the peak of the heat and raced at Firebird a few times when it felt hot enough to melt my tires.

The keys to riding in a lot of heat are:
1) stay hydrated, drink lots of water. If you don't need to piss at least once per hour, you are probably dehydrated.
2) stay cool. Nature's cooling is awesome. Buy some armored jeans and soak them with water before leaving for a ride of more than 30 minutes or so. As the jeans dry, they will cool you off. Generally they will be completely dry in about 20 minutes.
3) a wet bandana wrapped around your neck will cool your head a LOT. There are a lot of more modern approaches to the bandana using more modern materials. I used this idea when doing endurance racing in the heat of Chandler (Firebird), Las Vegas and Willow Springs in temps of 120 or so.
 

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The heat isn't that bad once you are here. My first vehicle was a motorcycle that I rode as my only transportation in high school. I then bought a truck that had no AC and vinyl seats. My next 2 vehicles after that had no AC either. What I'm getting at is I went about 5 years without any AC in my vehicles & i survived. You'll be fine. I rode my Harley when I had it with the temp at 118° & with a notoriously hot air cooled motorcycle that sucked but other than that I've been fine riding year round.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The heat isn't that bad once you are here. My first vehicle was a motorcycle that I rode as my only transportation in high school. I then bought a truck that had no AC and vinyl seats. My next 2 vehicles after that had no AC either. What I'm getting at is I went about 5 years without any AC in my vehicles & i survived. You'll be fine. I rode my Harley when I had it with the temp at 118° & with a notoriously hot air cooled motorcycle that sucked but other than that I've been fine riding year round.
I hope you are right. I just arrived in Gilbert 4 days ago and the A/C in my RX-8 has decided to start blowing max heat whenever it is turned on. :mad:
 

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Yes, wait till you feel 115. ;)

Seriously, you can find relief from the heat by heading up into the mountains.
In Florida, We get relief from the Summer Heat & High Humidity by staying indoors where it's Air Conditioned:cool:

And we ride very early mornings and early evenings.
 
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