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Anyone else use the Motoman method of breaking in your new FZ-09's? Letting it warm up, take off ripping and run it hard, reving up and letting the engine decelerate back down, back up, back down for 20 miles, take it home, change oil and filters and then fill her up with car oil and to avoid synthetic oil for the first 1500 miles.

I have used this method on my last two bikes,but switching to synthetic after 600 miles, but have never pulled the pistons to see the evidence.

LINK TO MOTOMAN SITE
 

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Personally I'm a bit skeptical of his method. I don't doubt that it's the best way to quickly seal the piston rings, but it gives zero consideration to the longevity of any other component... Not for me. Lots of gear changing and running up the rpms for me, and lots of engine braking, but I wait a while before really running it HARD
 

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You're not meant to run the bike hard in with motorman's method.
lots of compression braking, lots of steady acceleration up to 75% of the rev range.

I dumped the oil on the FZ at 140km, and it was gray not light brown.
I have done all my bikes this way, and no issues to speak of. I usually run rotella 15-40 for break in, then switch to synthetic around 7km.

last high miler was sold at 55km, Tenere has 37km, and feels new.
Also bought a brand new 2008 klr, that had issues with rings, and it worked great for that.

to each his own
 

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Personally I'm a bit skeptical of his method. I don't doubt that it's the best way to quickly seal the piston rings, but it gives zero consideration to the longevity of any other component... Not for me. Lots of gear changing and running up the rpms for me, and lots of engine braking, but I wait a while before really running it HARD
I'm curious what components you are referring to? In other words, which components can't handle it day 1 but after 500 miles now can handle it?
 

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I'm talking about any close tolerance surface in the engine or gearbox that rides against another one. From the camshafts, to bearings on the crankshaft, parts within the gearbox, any of them. They're all going to go through their own break in and wear process in the first few hundred miles, the piston rings are hardly the only ones. I'd rather let them wear "naturally" than accelerate that process and wear more than necessary, and I'd rather let them become worn in before truly running the engine hard. Just my opinion of course.
 

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I think some of you don't understand why the motoman method is recommended. The rings and cylinder have a finite time within which to 'break in', you are racing the clock on the cylinder/ring break in, all the other parts except camshafts can take their sweet time and will lap themselves into happiness but not the rings/cylinder and this is where the horsepower is made. What do I mean by finite time? The cylinder is honed to create minute circumferential scratches in a crisscross pattern designed to retain oil in the valleys of the hone marks with the peaks lapping in the rings to create a nice seal, to keep the combustion gasses above the piston pushing it down and not blowing by the piston rings into the sump. It takes combustion pressure to get behind the rings and force them out against the cylinder wall and we want to do this BEFORE the hone marks sharper PEAKS are worn down and before blow by glazes the cylinder wall with burnt oil. If you baby the engine, you may never have the ring seal (h.p.) that you could have. Breaking in an engine and mistreating one are 2 different things. A couple of good pulls on a dyno would go a long way to breaking in an engines rings/cylinders and once well mated to the cylinder the rings ride against the plateaus (sp?) of the worn down hone marks, wear from here on out, esp. with plated cylinders, is negligible and ring seal is good. This is exactly the approach we use on general aviation aircraft engines, high power (shallow climb out to keep engine cool) will usually result in telltale ring seal as evidenced by drop in oil temp as rings seal and blow by stops heating the oil in the sump. On a naturally aspirated engine (no boost) this is usually with in about an hour of first flight if done correctly. If done incorrectly by an owner wishing to take it easy, we sometimes never get good ring seal and have high oil consumption and in some cases have to pull the cylinders to hone and rering.$$$$

With modern machining tolerances and materials, I don't really think these new water cooled bikes are as critical to break in techniques especially one like the FZ-09 as it's power characteristics beg you to ride it in such a manner that it breaks itself in...do as you wish but know that the cylinder and rings do present you with a limited time to do it correctly, most of us would never probably know the difference until your buddies FZ keeps smoking you...Mark
 

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I personally could not go 600 miles on the first oil change on a new engine, to me that first oil change is the most important one and after a single break in run of between 50-100 miles I'd have to change it...jc there is a good break in post where we hashed out a lot of theory etc. but the simple fact is that large throttle openings and not rpm's are what aid break in. I can creep up to max rpm without opening the throttle enough to generate the combustion pressures that aid in rings breaking in. I can open the throttle wider and go through the gears generating these pressures without exceeding a safe or reasonable rpm or putting any undue strain on the rest of the machine, so can you.
 

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unless i read wrong my manual said not to exceed 5600 for extended period of time not that u cannot exceed it. Up and down revs is how i have done every thing i ever owned and nearly every motor is suggested to vary rpm
 

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AND THE DEBATE BEGINS AGAIN!

Personally I'm a bit skeptical of his method. I don't doubt that it's the best way to quickly seal the piston rings, but it gives zero consideration to the longevity of any other component... Not for me. Lots of gear changing and running up the rpms for me, and lots of engine braking, but I wait a while before really running it HARD
That is pretty much motoman's method, if you read it.

You can even do his method while following most all of the manufacture guidelines. I just don't understand why you want oil in for 600 miles that after about 20 has a lot of metal in it and after 300 has a hell of a lot so after 600 you are just using all those shavings to grind the rest of the metal thats leftover.

What i'm saying is you can use motoman's method, but change your oil at 20-30 miles then again at 600 and operate as recommended. That way you don't void any warranty if it's possible by not following the guidelines, and you ensure your piston rings are seated and that you don't have all those shavings beating up your engine.

The argument is a lot more gray than everybody realizes.
 

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knobby,
I agree and did my best to employ the motoman break in. I did my first oil change at 150. and second is at 1000. The miles get away from quickly in this california weather! Anyway, I used conventional oil but for a wet clutch. I was told not to use car oil???
My main question here for anyone and all is, should I use conventional again for my second oil change and then switch to synthetic on the third change? Or is it ok to go full synthetic now?

Thanks.
-Ben
Anyone else use the Motoman method of breaking in your new FZ-09's? Letting it warm up, take off ripping and run it hard, reving up and letting the engine decelerate back down, back up, back down for 20 miles, take it home, change oil and filters and then fill her up with car oil and to avoid synthetic oil for the first 1500 miles.

I have used this method on my last two bikes,but switching to synthetic after 600 miles, but have never pulled the pistons to see the evidence.

LINK TO MOTOMAN SITE
 

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I really should have made certain to change the oil at 600-700 miles. But live and learn. Changed it at 150 and will change again at 1000.

AND THE DEBATE BEGINS AGAIN!



That is pretty much motoman's method, if you read it.

You can even do his method while following most all of the manufacture guidelines. I just don't understand why you want oil in for 600 miles that after about 20 has a lot of metal in it and after 300 has a hell of a lot so after 600 you are just using all those shavings to grind the rest of the metal thats leftover.

What i'm saying is you can use motoman's method, but change your oil at 20-30 miles then again at 600 and operate as recommended. That way you don't void any warranty if it's possible by not following the guidelines, and you ensure your piston rings are seated and that you don't have all those shavings beating up your engine.

The argument is a lot more gray than everybody realizes.
 

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Motoman for me. First oil and filter change at. 20 miles....dyno oil. Continue with Motoman break in and change oil again at 100 miles....dyno oil again. Continue riding pretty hard and change oil again at 600 miles...Mobil 1 synthetic..15W-50.
 
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