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The TW200 is a bit of an oddball with it's unusual tire/wheel sizing.
 

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I was right with you in your otherwise excellent response until the last sentence. You really think a first-gen FZ-09 is "well behaved and good handling"? The bike is infamous for being the exact opposite of that.
I'm guessing we're not going to see you posting much in the joke of the day thread.
 

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Yeah, my wife started on a TW200. It was fine - for a couple of months. She outgrew it right quick and got an SV650, which was great. The TW has its uses, but as a starter bike it’s kind of a waste of time.

A DP bike in the 300-650 range would be a lot better to gain experience without breaking the bank, and they’re a lot of fun to ride anyway, so it’s something you might want to hang onto even after you start riding bigger street bikes…
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Yeah, my wife started on a TW200. It was fine - for a couple of months. She outgrew it right quick and got an SV650, which was great. The TW has its uses, but as a starter bike it’s kind of a waste of time.

A DP bike in the 300-650 range would be a lot better to gain experience without breaking the bank, and they’re a lot of fun to ride anyway, so it’s something you might want to hang onto even after you start riding bigger street bikes…
That's good to know about the tw200. Would the DR400 be a better choice. I'm definitely interested in keeping it around. On/off roading sounds fun. I guess im just looking for something that I can push to it's limits and learn crucial skills on something that's a bit more forgiving than the FZ 09.

What's the saying, it's better to ride something slow, fast, than to ride something fast, slow. 😅
 

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DRZ400’s are awesome. I haven’t ridden one, but I have a buddy that had one, and he would ride it on group rides in the canyons, off-road playing in the desert, even raced it in the Elsinore Grand Prix (not terribly competitive, but he finished!)…
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
DRZ400’s are awesome. I haven’t ridden one, but I have a buddy that had one, and he would ride it on group rides in the canyons, off-road playing in the desert, even raced it in the Elsinore Grand Prix (not terribly competitive, but he finished!)…
That's awesome. Alright I'll look into getting one or something similar.

Also I appreciate everyone's responses. Thanks everybody!
 

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I'm just kinda baffled some people with zero riding experience think its a good idea to hop on a 100+ horsepower bike with ~70lb-ft of torque. That is an insane amount of power for a beginner to learn on, especially for people who have never taken the MSF course and dont know the Do's and dont's of ridinng in the first place. I started on a ninja 650 and crashed it due to rider mistake, than after a few 8-10k seasons moved up to a Ducati Monster 797. Ego is a huge factor when it comes to motorcycles, whether it be wanting a bike that is out of your riding level/doing unorganized group rides/ not knowing when to tell yourself you got too much testosterone pumping through your blood to hop on your bike and not be reckless. if anything, an MT/FZ-09 is NOT a beginners bike in my eyes. Its a middleweight hyper-naked. zero experience does not equal to the words middleweight or hyper IMO. But then again, I've seen people start out on these bikes and be fine but they usually have had some sort of 2 wheel experience in their past whether it be dirtbikes, or heck even a 150cc scooter. If this is your first bike, no doubt you are going to have some hair raising/pant sh*tting/near death experiences if you are prone to that adrenaline rush. One turn too fast into a corner and that all folks. I see a lot of these bikes used at the dealership by me because people who just wnn go fast as F*ck and pop hella dank nooners realize real quick this aint the bike for them. Get a ninja400/650 oR similar and put at least 10k on that before you decide to upgrade to a bike with almost triple the power before you go head in. I would even suggest getting something in between the 2 IMO before an almost 900cc triple. It makes us motorcyclists look better /more mature and you will still have a blast learning on those bikes. Just my 2 cents. a lot of people dont know what theyre getting into and overestimate themselves.
 

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I have been riding all sizes of bikes for a lot of years. I traded my 2015 FZ09 for an 07 after just a year because of the abrupt throttle response. On tight mountain show corners it was difficult to be fast. That years bike in my opinion definitely required a point and shoot style of riding. The FZ07 suited my style much much better, never scary, and I am sure I was even faster on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
What about after a ECU flash. I'm not really interested in doing wheelies. I like cruising and eventually I think carving up curves would be fun so if this bike is really only suited for wheelies and blasting off at the speed of light maybe I outta get something else?
 

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eventually I think carving up curves would be fun so if this bike is really only suited for wheelies and blasting off at the speed of light maybe I outta get something else?
Not sure which comment gave you that impression, but the FZ - with a few tweaks - is perfectly suited for carving up corners. However…
So my plan going forward is to pick up a dual sport in the spring and do the msf course and put a ton of time on that on both the dirt and st.
Stick to this plan! Get some experience and take some classes. It will make the FZ much more satisfying to ride when you know what you are doing…
 

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You already have some riding experience, so I would keep it and learn to adapt to it. My nephew has the FZ09 and I've ridden it. I have it's sibling the FJ09 and it has the same motor. They are torque machines and when you pass about 7k on the RPM's that inline triple turns into a whole other machine. I absolutely love the bike though. You are doing good by using B mode; stay there for a while, and keep the rpm's down and be respectful of the machine and before long you will be so glad you kept it.
 

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Best advice I've learned, "When in doubt, don't." You are wise to recognize a bike that feels like it's too much.

My own experience with the FZ 09: I test rode a 2015 FZ 09 and FZ 07 back to back years ago. Preferred the FZ 07 because it felt like the FZ 09 would kill me.

You've already expressed the answer to your own question. Take the MSF course. Like me, you started riding without it. My mistake. Like many others have written, your FZ 09 is a handful. Either park it to later ease into it or sell it and get a newer MT 09. The difference between the FZ 09 test ride I took years ago and the new MT 09 I just bought will save your life.

Shiny side up, mi amigo!
 

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You already have some riding experience
👇

My experience is pretty minimal. I had a 2001 CBR 600 that I rode for a summer, but it was very conservative and cautious at best, and probably lacking in basic fundamental skills.
That doesn’t exactly scream to me, “Hey, you should go jump on a liter bike!”

I’m frankly tired of hearing people suggest that MT09’s make good beginner bikes, because “you can just ride it in B mode”. What a crock. I’m sure there has been the occasional 16-year-old whose first bike was a Hayabusa, and they didn’t die on it. Does that mean it’s a good idea???

What is the rush? For a new rider who’s exceptionally skilled and mature, I would say it’s going to take at least a year of serious riding to get to the level of being able to exploit what the MT has to offer. For the average rider, it’s going to take a lot longer, and some folks will never reach that level. What’s wrong with spending a few seasons on a lighter, easier-to-ride motorcycle that doesn’t have enough power to exceed highway speed limits in 1st gear? Even in B mode, an MT can get you into trouble in a heartbeat if you don’t know what you’re doing.

The OP, to his credit, seems to understand that, but this is for others who may reference this thread. For all those who continually encourage newbies to buy freakin’ MT09’s, just stop.
 
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👇



That doesn’t exactly scream to me, “Hey, you should go jump on a liter bike!”

I’m frankly tired of hearing people suggest that MT09’s make good beginner bikes, because “you can just ride it in B mode”. What a crock. I’m sure there has been the occasional 16-year-old whose first bike was a Hayabusa, and they didn’t die on it. Does that mean it’s a good idea???

What is the rush? For a new rider who’s exceptionally skilled and mature, I would say it’s going to take at least a year of serious riding to get to the level of being able to exploit what the MT has to offer. For the average rider, it’s going to take a lot longer, and some folks will never reach that level. What’s wrong with spending a few seasons on a lighter, easier-to-ride motorcycle that doesn’t have enough power to exceed highway speed limits in 1st gear? Even in B mode, an MT can get you into trouble in a heartbeat if you don’t know what you’re doing.

The OP, to his credit, seems to understand that, but this is for others who may reference this thread. For all those who continually encourage newbies to buy freakin’ MT09’s, just stop.

What's wrong with just climbing aboard and sending it? 🤷‍♂️

You know the golden rule right? " when in doubt throttle out!" 😜
 

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went from a Honda VTR250 twin (in 2009) to FZ6 il4 (2011)-now on an XSR900 triple (2021)- each step was a leap at the time. After the first days of euphoria of a new bike, it was time to learn to ride each one and then you still get surprised going from staright commuting to hitting twisties with blind corners, gravel on the apex and funny cambers. IMO the OP should maybe park the bike for 6 months and spend some time on something more suited to skill levels. When the have "learnt how to learn" to ride the bike under their bum they can start extending themselves to learn the next bike.
The XSR can be a beast, I don't ride in "a", no need in city riding- but when I get out to the country I'll have to take time to "learn " it. I won't take it for granted and no-one else can tell me when I have learnt enough. I'll have to be smart enough to remember you never dtop learning

Good Luck w your decision OP, whatever you decide.
 
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This has been an ongoing discussion since I've been on this forum. I agree, the MT09 is not a good beginner bike. Riding in B mode doesn't turn it into a beginner bike, it just tames it a little. My experience is that I rode motocross bikes until I was 40 and then figured I was getting too old. Never owned a street bike until 5 years ago. Subsequently went from a 2016 Ducati Scrambler to a 2016 XSR900 to a 2017 FJ 09 to a 2019 MT 10.

IMO, the single most important thing is seat time so that brakes, throttle, clutch and riding position become second nature so that response to all of the conditions and situations become automatic. All of these things were 2nd nature to me from my off road riding but there was still a big learning curve getting on to the street. There's no substitute for experience. Not only seat time but also reading and watching riding videos etc. Even though a lot of people that start out on smaller bikes feel like they quickly outgrew them, they didn't necessarily gain enough experience to get to where everything is 2nd nature.

I got hit in a parking lot doing 5 - 10 MPH 3 years ago. I just hit 6 months past a knee replacement as a result.

When my MT 10 was about a month old, I took it out for a ride in January. 45 ° weather. Going from my gravel driveway to pavement, I gassed it hard and the rear wheel broke loose. Traction control kicked in and the bike hooked up and went in the opposite direction and I went down.......hard. Could barely move for a month. Completely my fault. I had barely ridden the bike because of weather and didn't have any EXPERIENCE on it. All happened in 1 - 2 seconds. I was lucky, no structural damage to bike and no life changing injuries. Even with quite a bit of experience I still had to learn, after riding in gravel, give it a chance to shed the gravel. Cold tires, give them a chance to warm up.

I've crashed my brains out a gazillion times off road. Broke my foot, shoulder and have been knocked out cold. Childs play compared to getting hit by a car at any speed and pavement is way harder than dirt. You do not want to crash on the street.

As a frame of reference, a 1969 Kawasaki H1 500 cc was the fastest production bike at 60 HP and was called the widow maker. (It was also an ill handling bike) My 2016 Scrambler was 75 HP and is considered a beginner bike. An MT 09 is well over 100 HP. You can get in trouble real fast with that much power and limited experience. Especially if you go riding with other more experienced riders and you're riding over your head trying to keep up. Realistically, 100+ HP motorcycles are intrinsically insane. They're faster than 99.9% of the vehicles on the road. It might make sense to become a good rider on a smaller displacement bike before you get on one designed to appeal to people that are slightly off.

One of the best rides I went on in the last 5 years was on a June morning along the ocean in New Hampshire where the speed limit was 25. Twisting road in a beautiful place in the bright sunshine and on 2 wheels. ......then again, blasting down Interstate 195 racing a Maserati at 165 MPH was one of the best rides too.
 

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I was thinking a tw200, so I could get it on the cheap, ride the hell out of it, and really learn some shit. To be honest though, I don't know anything about duals. I see they have a DR400, so maybe that might be a better option.
I have a 2015 fz09 I bought new I now have 49K miles on. I bought mine new from a dealer in April of 2015 and it already had new fuel mapping flashed by the dealership to smooth the throttle response. Yours probably had that flash also. My advice is setup the suspension for your weight and work your way up from B mode. Sit forward on the seat and hold on. you will love that bike before you know it. I eventually upgraded my rear suspension to Ohlins and I’m currently upgrading the front suspension to K-tec cartridges.
 

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Alright so I'm getting some responses different than what I expected.

Is getting a dual sport a waste of time then?

I'm located in Iowa. Not sure where vcyclenut is located but I have heard about the ECU flash and suspension adjustment being helpful. I'll look into that some more for sure.
I am also located in Iowa, south east. Bought my fz09 new in 2014. I am 6’ and 200 lbs. if your in my area we can cruise!
 
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