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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright so I just bought a 2015 FZ 09 the other weekend. Now that the adrenaline rush of buying a bike has passed and reading through the forums on here, I am starting to think I may have bitten off more than I could chew.

My experience is pretty minimal. I had a 2001 CBR 600 that I rode for a summer, but it was very conservative and cautious at best, and probably lacking in basic fundamental skills. I did get to a level of comfort just riding around and had a wheel come up at 80m/h and didn't die, also went through the dropped bike experience馃槄

So my plan going forward is to pick up a dual sport in the spring and do the msf course and put a ton of time on that on both the dirt and st.

My question for some of the more experienced riders is whether I should try to slowly transition to the 09 after a few months, (in B mode of course) or whether I should just try and sell or swap the 09 for an 07.

Additional information. The bike has about 11k miles on it. Got it for 4900. I'm 6'1" and weigh 195, give or take 15 pounds.

Thanks!
 

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If you're careful you should be ok. IMO, they're deceptively fast. Not surprisingly violent or anything, they're just smooth about being so quick and it kinda sneaks up on you. So don't go hooning around unless you're paying attention.

If you don't go yanking on the throttle you'll be ok, just take it easy until you get used to it. Coming from an 07 myself, the 07 will accidentally wheelie on you easier than the 09 will. The 07's hit pretty hard, then peter out. The 09 takes a bigger yank of throttle to get the front up. My point is, they'll both get away from you if you don't respect them, so I wouldn't offload the 09 for an 07 just for this reason.

An msf course is never a bad idea. If you feel intimidated by the 09 you'll never be comfortable which means you'll never be safe. There's no shame in that. I'm glad I worked my up to bigger bikes through the years. You can never go wrong playing it safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's an interesting perspective on the 07. Accidental wheelies are my main concern and I've read about some issues with stability around corners. Some videos I watched made it seem like the 09 basically preferred to ride vertically with just a little gas here and there. Definitely getting a dual sport at this point to really fine tune some skills but maybe I won't give her up just yet then.
 

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You got it now, might as well keep it. Get yourself as much seat time as you can without riding like an *******. Showing off and riding over your head are the biggest things to avoid. There's so many resources online that you can learn a lot. There comes a point where you spend enough time on a motorcycle and the reactions become second nature. The trick is to get to that point in one piece. Besides having a lot of motor, it also is a well behaved good handling bike with pretty good braking. You could do a lot worse.
 

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You will get familiar with the bike in no time. My advice would be to hone your "street skills". Like Chester said, don't ride like an asshat and really, really concentrate on all the dangerous shit that can happen on public roads.
 

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I started riding in February, on a 800cc cruiser. Rode it daily (I have about 7mile commute) until late July. I went from that to a 2020 MT-09. It was definitely intimidating at first, so I rode in B-mode for a couple hundred miles until I figured out throttle response and was more comfortable. Now, I ride it in STD mode, and will push it a little more given the right scenario.

Give it some time, watch some videos on throttle manipulation and give it a conscious effort to be slow and smooth while riding and you should be fine. Respect the bike but don't be afraid of it, it will only do what you tell it to.
 

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Empty parking lots are a great place to practice. Practice turning, starts, stops, turning, throttle control and turning. Not having to worry about asshats in traffic is a good thing. You will also want to figure out traffic but getting comfortable is very a important start.

Going through the MSF is a great idea also. I didn't see you mentioning where you are but there still may be courses available in some areas of the country.

I would think the -09 would be a much less intimidating bike in B-mode than the F4. The upright riding position should give you a much better feel, almost like an oversized dirty-bike. Plus, it's a lot easier seeing what's going on around you.

Get your suspension set up for your weight. With that, you will get rid of much of the pitching for-aft when getting on and off the throttle and on the brakes. That pitching can make transitions intimidating. A well set up suspension makes a world of difference.

I'd ask if you have friends to ride with but that can be a mixed bag. If they don't have the right experience, you can be fed things that may not help you become a better rider quicker. YouTube vids are the same mixed bag, there are some good ones that will help you with technique and some that are terrible and can get you hurt.

Feel free to ask questions, search the forum. There are quite a few good people on this site with a lot of good knowledge who are more than willing to help.
 

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And learn to steer your motorcycle. "Leaning" a bike to turn is not a great way to do it, even though it does kinda sorta work a little bit. Learn to countersteer, practice it, engrain it in your brain. It'll become second nature quickly.

It sounds like a fancy internet trend, but it's actually very important to riding safety. Especially on modern sporty bikes with steep forks that steer the way the do.
 

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If you have a brain and impulse control, you will be OK. There are a few things that will help.
1. have the ECU flashed By VCyclenut and tell him the truth about your riding and he should be able to give you a easier to ride bike.
2. until then, you can simply shift up to keep the torque in check.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Alright so I'm getting some responses different than what I expected.

Is getting a dual sport a waste of time then?

I'm located in Iowa. Not sure where vcyclenut is located but I have heard about the ECU flash and suspension adjustment being helpful. I'll look into that some more for sure.
 

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You got it now, might as well keep it. Get yourself as much seat time as you can without riding like an ***. Showing off and riding over your head are the biggest things to avoid. There's so many resources online that you can learn a lot. There comes a point where you spend enough time on a motorcycle and the reactions become second nature. The trick is to get to that point in one piece. Besides having a lot of motor, it also is a well behaved good handling bike with pretty good braking. You could do a lot worse.
I was right with you in your otherwise excellent response until the last sentence. You really think a first-gen FZ-09 is "well behaved and good handling"? The bike is infamous for being the exact opposite of that.
 

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I was right with you in your otherwise excellent response until the last sentence. You really think a first-gen FZ-09 is "well behaved and good handling"? The bike is infamous for being the exact opposite of that.
While the first gen had it's shortcomings, it isn't a dangerous bike, just harder to develop confidence in until you at least get the suspension dialed-in. The throttle is kinda wonky but not terrible if you use B mode. The OP came off of an F4, which isn't known to have the smoothest off throttle transition. All that's not to say that a flash wouldn't help but it isn't an absolute necessity.
 

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@Amega, what do you know about the bike you bought? Has there been any suspension work done to it? ECU flash? Or is it box stock? I don't recall seeing anything posted so far...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
@Amega, what do you know about the bike you bought? Has there been any suspension work done to it? ECU flash? Or is it box stock? I don't recall seeing anything posted so far...
I'm not sure on the suspension but I don't think so and I know it hasn't been flashed. Standard mode was pretty snatchy in 1st when I tested it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
A DR650 is never a waste of time.
I was thinking a tw200, so I could get it on the cheap, ride the hell out of it, and really learn some shit. To be honest though, I don't know anything about duals. I see they have a DR400, so maybe that might be a better option.
 

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The key to survival, and riding really quickly, is to make all your inputs smooth. Don't grab a handful of throttle, don't suddenly jam on the brakes, don't shove on the bars. You need to let tyres and suspension etc respond to inputs.
That's why the "aliens" could ride MotoGP 500cc strokers and the first 1000cc 4 strokes with 240hp and minimal rider aids so fast. Their inputs were super quick, but smooth.
 
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