Yamaha FZ-09 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
666 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just put the first 100 miles on a new Pilot Road 2 CT rear. Since it's a touring tire, I wasn't sure if it was going to be sticky or not, but after getting used to its profile and scrubbing that greasy new tire stuff off... I gotta say it's a nice tire! :thumbsup: We'll see how long it lasts. Stock Dunlop's center was toast @ 2900 mi.

IMG_2306.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
666 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks Paul. I read that thread before buying the tire, thanks for the design pressure reminder, I will keep it there.

$147 isn't a bad price for that tire, especially if it lasts twice as long as the Dunlop...

As a bonus, the guy who mounted it did so without putting one nick on the rim. Spotless job on his part. Someone referred me to a local guy running a small hole-in-the-wall type shop, and after hanging out watching him I am convinced that any "pro" that dings up your rims while changing tires did so on purpose or is a complete noob... With the proper equipment and technique, there is no reason to damage wheels!
So, yeah... I'm happy so far.

this is the same type of machine he uses in his shop:
tyrechanger.jpg
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,734 Posts
Excellent tyres.
These tyres are designed to be inflated to 42psi regardless of load or riding style.For best life and handling keep that pressure correct.

Michelin pilot road 2 - Speedzilla Motorcycle Message Forums
I totally disagree with the 42psi number unless you have the tire fully loaded. We had this discussion before on other tires and those numbers will get you a harsh ride (unless you have the bike fully loaded to the maximum and then some) as well as very little grip in the corners. I run my ST1300 Pilot Road III's at those pressures, but that bike weighs 720 lbs and I ride it two up about 99% of the time...with rainsuits, air compressor, top box, and 340 lbs of rider and passenger. If I were using the PR II on my FZ, I'd be running 32/32 in the spirited riding mode and probably bump it up to around 36/36 for highway/commuting. YMMV
 
  • Like
Reactions: v2Bob

·
Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
I had PR2's front and back on my Hawk GT. 400 pound bike with 200 pound rider. ran 32 front 34 rear loved the grip and wear.
 
  • Like
Reactions: triplethreat

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,081 Posts
My only experience with changing pressure is with these dunlops...I get a lot more grip in the 30s, and the wear is worse in the middle with higher pressures...at least as far as I can tell. Once I lowered the pressure the wear got a lot more even.

As for that link, find an engineer that lives in the real world...then I will believe what he says about his product.

Our sponsors live in the real world...in case they are engineers :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,734 Posts
I'm certainly no expert when it comes to tires and tire pressures, but I do have a lot of experience in different riding situations with different tire pressures and how it affects the tires ability to grip because of heat build up in the tire. I will always post a differing opinion when I see something like the above post that talks about running 42 psi no matter what situation. That, is just totally wrong.
 
  • Like
Reactions: v2Bob

·
Registered
Joined
·
666 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There's a ton of conflicting information out there with regards to tire pressure, and tires in general for that matter. Too many variables, I guess.

70% of the riding I do is city/short freeway trips, and 25% of that time I will have a passenger with me on the city streets. Weekends I like to tear around in the canyons & mountains, which ends up being around 200 miles over the weekend.

I discussed my riding habits to the guy who mounted the tire, and suggested 36 psi. He tells me that lower pressures can cause funny wear, running high psi will wear them out too fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
666 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
almost 1000 miles on it now, and there's just a slight amount of wear showing. Has been kept at 42psi. I plan on burning through this tire using that pressure, and the next one I'll keep at 36 and see how it goes.
pr2 900 mi c.jpg

...and a picture of the tire in action last weekend! Not a very good camera angle unfortunately. Back of my head looks nice I guess. Bike looks pretty bitchin' :p
GM_29929.jpg
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
161 Posts
You'll probably get 4500 out of it. Good tire
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
666 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Now at 3100 miles. Flattening out a bit in the center, but not dramatically. My riding ability fits well within the capability of these tires. Would I buy them again? Yes, without hesitation.
I look forward to testing the next PR2 rear at a lower PSI to see how the wear and handling is affected.

IMG_2535s.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
I totally disagree with the 42psi number unless you have the tire fully loaded. We had this discussion before on other tires and those numbers will get you a harsh ride (unless you have the bike fully loaded to the maximum and then some) as well as very little grip in the corners. I run my ST1300 Pilot Road III's at those pressures, but that bike weighs 720 lbs and I ride it two up about 99% of the time...with rainsuits, air compressor, top box, and 340 lbs of rider and passenger. If I were using the PR II on my FZ, I'd be running 32/32 in the spirited riding mode and probably bump it up to around 36/36 for highway/commuting. YMMV
You obviously know better than the tyre designer.

After reading the post in the link I posted,I tried various pressures in the PR2s on my 1250,measuring the pressure rise from cold.I found 42psi gave the correct pressure rise.Indicating the correct operating temperature.Lower than 42 ,within reason, gave lower operating temperatures.None of these pressures had a noticeable effect on harshness.
Seems Michelin knows what they are talking about when it comes to tyres they designed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,424 Posts
The PR's warm up instantly, whether at 42 or 36. Lower psi yields more contact patch when leaned over. 42 is more for the road on a heavier sport tour bike. I run 34/36 in the twisties and 36/38 on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Ive noticed also different countries have different grades and types of stone used for road surface. Maybe that and the surface temp the country's under layers hold, makes a difference in psi per tyre used. Plus I guess a little of personal preference
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top