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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm noticing that my rear tire is starting to wear in the center and is developing a flat footprint, so I suppose I should start looking into new rubber soon. I want to know if a 190/50/17 will work as a rear tire on the FZ/MT-09 or do I have to stay with 180/55/17?
 

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What pressure are you running on your tires now?

I had a similar issue happen but that's because I did probably 3k miles of commuting on the rear.

To fizzers point, if you're trying to mitigate the flat spot, I don't see how a wider tire will help if you're using it a lot to commute.

Perhaps a harder compound tire may better suit your riding vs a wider tire (check out the Michelin PR4 vs the PP3s)
 

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You might want to just consider changing to a different tire, instead of a different tire size.

Maybe something like a Michelin Pilot Power 3 or Pilot Road 4, which use a dual-compound technology successfully accomplishes two conflicting ideals: wear resistance in the centre of the tread, and grip on the shoulders.

mrp4.JPG

One of the guys I work with has gotten great mileage out of the older style Michelin Pilot Road 2's on his SV1000S. Which is a pretty close match to the 09 for weight, torque and HP. I'll see what mileage he has gotten and post it later.

Edit: - Co-worker with a Suzuki SV1000S running a set of Michelin Pilot Road 2, has clocked 12,500 miles so far. He figures he can get another 500 miles out of the rear and a good 1000 miles out of the front.

Just to compare:
2003 Suzuki SV1000S is spec'd at 120 BHP, 75 lb ft torque and wet weight 458.5 lbs.
2014 Yamamha FZ-09 is spec'd at 115 BHP, 65 lb ft torque and wet weight 414 lbs.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I think my tires are at around 35psi or so.. I was just curious as to what people are using for max tire width.

Since I purchased my FZ in March I've racked up over 7000 miles on the original tires, most of it commuting to work. This is my very first motorbike and I'm still shy about leaning the bike down low in corners, so most of the wear is in the center 60% of the tire.

Perhaps a harder compound would be better for me at this time.. I'll check out the Michelin PR4's as suggested, can anyone recommend any other good tire choices?
 

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I think my tires are at around 35psi or so.. I was just curious as to what people are using for max tire width.

Since I purchased my FZ in March I've racked up over 7000 miles on the original tires, most of it commuting to work. This is my very first motorbike and I'm still shy about leaning the bike down low in corners, so most of the wear is in the center 60% of the tire.

Perhaps a harder compound would be better for me at this time.. I'll check out the Michelin PR4's as suggested, can anyone recommend any other good tire choices?
PSI is a personal thing but that's what i ride mine at as well - was just curious - 7k miles on the tires and you're just getting a flat spot now is actually incredibly good wear for the stock tires - do you know how to check the tire wear indicators? - not trying to insult your intelligence by any means but just because the side walls may look like they have good tread, if your wear indicators are worn out in the middle - it's time to change the tire immediately. I only mention that because 7k miles sounds like the most anyone has gone on the stock tires so far.

I have the pilot power 3s - i've said it on several other threads but i can't say enough good things about them. The turn in takes a little more effort but once you're leaning, they stick like glue. They are confidence inspiring to say the least - something i never really felt much with the stock bridgestones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
PSI is a personal thing but that's what i ride mine at as well - was just curious - 7k miles on the tires and you're just getting a flat spot now is actually incredibly good wear for the stock tires - do you know how to check the tire wear indicators? - not trying to insult your intelligence by any means but just because the side walls may look like they have good tread, if your wear indicators are worn out in the middle - it's time to change the tire immediately. I only mention that because 7k miles sounds like the most anyone has gone on the stock tires so far.

I have the pilot power 3s - i've said it on several other threads but i can't say enough good things about them. The turn in takes a little more effort but once you're leaning, they stick like glue. They are confidence inspiring to say the least - something i never really felt much with the stock bridgestones.
No offense taken, this is all completely new to me.. I'm used to getting 2-4 years of life on my car tires so having a set of tires wear out in less than a year comes as a surprise. There is still about half the depth left in the sipes in the middle of the tire and all the depth on the edge sipes. I'm probably not the most aggressive rider which explains why they may have lasted longer than most people would get out of them.
 

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Tire life vs grip has come a long way. It was only 10 years ago that I was running through three rears a season.
+1 on the Michelin Pilot road 4.
 

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No offense taken, this is all completely new to me.. I'm used to getting 2-4 years of life on my car tires so having a set of tires wear out in less than a year comes as a surprise. There is still about half the depth left in the sipes in the middle of the tire and all the depth on the edge sipes. I'm probably not the most aggressive rider which explains why they may have lasted longer than most people would get out of them.
No worries - i'm not anything that closely resembles an expert but keep an eye on those wear marks (particularly at the different places on the tire as it will wear differently). A big part of tire wear comes down to how you ride for sure - just like in a car - but these compounds to my knowledge are much softer. Also keep in mind that tire wear is not linear meaning the more the tire wears the quicker it heats up which yields to faster wear (e.g. if it took you 2500 miles to get halfway through the tire - it will not be 2500 more miles until the tire is dead - it's probably somewhere like 1500 miles or something to that effect). I'm hoping to get a riding year and a half out of my PP3s but yes - they do not last anywhere near what a car lasts even with far less mileage on them and they are damn expensive.

Cost of doing business :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well I'm going to order new tires tonight and they look to be around $250 for both together from Revzilla, which is a lot less than I paid last month for my Evo X car tires which cost me almost $1300 for a set of 4 Michelin Pilot Super Sports.
 

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$250 sounds like a pretty good deal - i was out $300 on my PP3s and then another $85 on getting them installed.

Not sure if you do these yourself or have a dealer put them on but you may want to get a quote from your shop before ordering - the price of install is higher if you bring your own tires vs. buy from them - not always - but sometimes the price works out better if you get them through a shop vs. online.

I need to get a tire machine...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
$250 sounds like a pretty good deal - i was out $300 on my PP3s and then another $85 on getting them installed.

Not sure if you do these yourself or have a dealer put them on but you may want to get a quote from your shop before ordering - the price of install is higher if you bring your own tires vs. buy from them - not always - but sometimes the price works out better if you get them through a shop vs. online.

I need to get a tire machine...
I don't have the tools or the confidence to do it myself, but I have my 3rd oil service coming up in the next few weeks so I'll get the dealer to install the new rubber while I'm there.
 

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I have read about some dealers who won't install tires unless they sell them. Lots of shops have started matching any online prices, and most of the shops around here give you a deal when you install tires you buy through them.

So it's worth checking and seeing if your local dealer will match the price and if they charge less to install tires bought through them?

I know lots of people install their own tires, which is great if you do it often or have multiple bikes.

The one big advantage to buying and having the tires installed at a dealer. If something goes wrong with the tire(manufacturers defect), you might have a better chance of getting the tire replaced under warranty.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The chances of a scratched up rim, seem higher than a defective tire. I will change my own.
I've already scratched my rear rim putting on and taking off my Abus chain so I'm not too worried in that department.. I think subliminally I want the rims to get scratched so I'll have a reason to paint them black.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So I ordered the Michelin 2CT's yesterday.. After reading many reviews between the Pilot Power 3's and the 2CT's I decided the 2CT's were the best choice for me. Hopefully they'll last me more than a year this time.
 
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You might want to just consider changing to a different tire, instead of a different tire size.

Maybe something like a Michelin Pilot Power 3 or Pilot Road 4, which use a dual-compound technology successfully accomplishes two conflicting ideals: wear resistance in the centre of the tread, and grip on the shoulders.

View attachment 11597

One of the guys I work with has gotten great mileage out of the older style Michelin Pilot Road 2's on his SV1000S. Which is a pretty close match to the 09 for weight, torque and HP. I'll see what mileage he has gotten and post it later.

Edit: - Co-worker with a Suzuki SV1000S running a set of Michelin Pilot Road 2, has clocked 12,500 miles so far. He figures he can get another 500 miles out of the rear and a good 1000 miles out of the front.

Just to compare:
2003 Suzuki SV1000S is spec'd at 120 BHP, 75 lb ft torque and wet weight 458.5 lbs.
2014 Yamamha FZ-09 is spec'd at 115 BHP, 65 lb ft torque and wet weight 414 lbs.
I ran 2 sets of PR2s on my SV1000S both rears lasted 10,000 miles easy. And I live in the land of square 1 mile blocks for roads. The nearest curve is a highway off ramp. The SV1000S and FZ09 have almost the same power to weight ratio.
 
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