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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I went to check the chain tension on the bike today. Looked in the owner's manual and saw the specs - thought it sounded a bit tight. Checked the font of knowledge that is this forum (thanks, guys) and decided to go with the 25-28mm advised here. Went to check the tension on the chain and almost fell over. I had almost 2 inches! wtf. :nightmare: Called the husband over to verify that I had not lost my mind. I had not. Went to loosen the rear axle bolt to tighten the chain and found that it was hand tight.:eek: My husband looked at me in all seriousness and said, "You're lucky you're not dead."

When I bought it from the dealer, I didn't think to double-check the tightness of the bolt. Lesson learned.

The chain is now nice and tight, freshly cleaned and lubed, and the axle bolt is torqued to 108, so I'm breathing a bit easier.

Please know I'm not trying to bash dealer mechanics here, I'm just hoping that if you're like me and don't double-check a new bike, do it. Better safe than sorry.

I will now retire to the corner where I can kick myself in shame...
 

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So I went to check the chain tension on the bike today. Looked in the owner's manual and saw the specs - thought it sounded a bit tight. Checked the font of knowledge that is this forum (thanks, guys) and decided to go with the 25-28mm advised here. Went to check the tension on the chain and almost fell over. I had almost 2 inches! wtf. :nightmare: Called the husband over to verify that I had not lost my mind. I had not. Went to loosen the rear axle bolt to tighten the chain and found that it was hand tight.:eek: My husband looked at me in all seriousness and said, "You're lucky you're not dead."

When I bought it from the dealer, I didn't think to double-check the tightness of the bolt. Lesson learned.

The chain is now nice and tight, freshly cleaned and lubed, and the axle bolt is torqued to 108, so I'm breathing a bit easier.

Please know I'm not trying to bash dealer mechanics here, I'm just hoping that if you're like me and don't double-check a new bike, do it. Better safe than sorry.

I will now retire to the corner where I can kick myself in shame...


Glad you figured it out before getting hurt. Reminds me of my buddy when he first got his brand new ninja 650. Going around a turn he leaned on his bars a bit and they dropped right down to the tank.
 

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Several years ago, I left the axle nut loose on my 93' CB750 after a rear tire change. I was loaded with camping gear to go on a 400 mile ride when I discovered it just 3 miles from home. I quickly pulled over, snugged it best I could with the tools in the under seat kit and went back home to tighten it properly. I was paranoid the whole weekend.
 

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I just checked mine since you mentioned it, thanks for the heads up. I found the front axle pinch bolt so loose that it was about to fall out just a couple of days after buying my fz-09. I wonder why the rear axle nut on this bike does not use a cotter pin like every other bike I've owned to make sure the nut doesn't loosen?
 

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Please know I'm not trying to bash dealer mechanics here, I'm just hoping that if you're like me and don't double-check a new bike, do it. Better safe than sorry.
I will now retire to the corner where I can kick myself in shame...
Nothing shameful in assuming someone would have done their job. Just be glad you thought to check your chain and caught this. Checking over the bike when new, and as routine habit is a must.

The TCLOCK Checklist



TCLOCK is an acronym that helps to cover the bike from stem to stern, for a quick inspection:



T- Tires and Wheels

Tires- Check tread depth, wear and air pressure
Wheels- See if any spokes are loose or if the rim is bent or cracked. See if it turns freely, but is not loose on the axle.
C- Control Levers

Inspect levers. Verify they are not bent or broken and move easily.
Check cables for fraying and lubricate them.
Check hoses for cracks, leaks, bulges and chaffed areas
Make sure the throttle moves freely. Closes easily. Lube if needed.
L- Lights & Battery

Check that the battery terminals are clean and tight and that the electrolyte level is correct. Plus make sure the vent tube is hooked to the vent outlet and not kinked
Check the turn signals and brake lights for proper operation. Make sure the lenses are not cracked or broken
Headlight- Check for proper operation and alignment
O- Oil Levels

Check engine oil level plus transmission and primary drive fluid levels


C- Chassis

Steering Head-Move handlebars back and forth to check for tight spots or binding.
Hold the front brake and rock the bike front to back to check for any free play in the neck bearings.
Suspension- Check the front forks and the rear shocks for smooth travel and right air pressure (If equipped)
Belt- Check tension and visually inspect for any rocks or other objects stuck in it.
Fasteners- Check for any loose nuts or bolts and tighten if needed
K- Kickstand

Side stand- Check for ease of operation and spring action.
 
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I am still of the opinion that 108 is way too high. I usually end up with around 85 ft. lbs of torque on mine....Your mileage may vary.
 

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If it was my bike I would let the dealer know what happened. Sounds like someone there needs help staying focused on the job at hand. I wouldnt make a big deal out of it, but just let them know. Glad all that happened was your chain loosened.
 
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