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2019 Yamaha MT 10
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I have a lot of experience with K-Tech. That shock will make a huge difference. Then you have to do fork cartridges. Then your 09 becomes a weapon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My stock one feels much better than '17's model I had previous. But, At 3000kms now feels less precise than new . I buy K-tech more as prevention. Also I did not like YA335 on my last bike. It was never as plush as I liked whatever I tried.I hope better adjustability with this one.
 

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I've had ktech parts on the t700 supermoto and they have transformed the bike... Suspension is worth investing in if the stock one is not good.
Aleks
Same outcome here with a full K-Tech conversion of both front and rear suspension on a Tracer 900 GT. Magic carpet ride outcome!!
 

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The YA335 is not as sophisticated as the K-Tech or the Ohlins with the reservoir. If your going to spend $500 you might as well go for $800 and get the good one. The 09s are easy bikes to get a plush ride and handle well with a good rear shock.
 

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How about Penske, how does it fair compare to the others?
Any brand of shock is only as good as how it is set up for you.
When you have a shock built, the technician will discuss your weight and intended usage (track, street, touring etc.) and they build it accordingly. I have owned a few Penske shocks and they are amazing, I have also ridden several bikes with Ohlins and they were equally as good.
 

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I did Ohlins NIX full cartridge conversion kit on my FZ07. I was very happy with them. It was $750.

I just put Ktech's drop-in fork valves in my FZ09. Noticably plusher than my other forks and gives up nothing at speed. It's the best I've ridden so far. $180.

I'm a big fan of Ktech at the moment 😁
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I did Ohlins NIX full cartridge conversion kit on my FZ07. I was very happy with them. It was $750.

I just put Ktech's drop-in fork valves in my FZ09. Noticably plusher than my other forks and gives up nothing at speed. It's the best I've ridden so far. $180.

I'm a big fan of Ktech at the moment 😁
΅η
I did Ohlins NIX full cartridge conversion kit on my FZ07. I was very happy with them. It was $750.

I just put Ktech's drop-in fork valves in my FZ09. Noticably plusher than my other forks and gives up nothing at speed. It's the best I've ridden so far. $180.

I'm a big fan of Ktech at the moment 😁
What year is your FZ09?
 

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Some old notes about my Tracer 900 GT 2019 model suspension upgrade from September 4th 2019. Afterwards, my bum thought it had died and gone to heaven!


I'll have to be briefer than usual, for my supposedly-fixed PC is still sulking.

The work took Joe - owner of Ride Dynamics and suspension guru par excellence - some three and half hours of steady work, with no coffee or smoko breaks and no time-wasting Facebook chat.

As I had said before, his workshop is neat, clean, tidy, a place for everything and everything in its place, including the multitude of specialist tools required for this work. I couldn't imagine an amateur like me working with cheap hand-tools in a home garage being successful.

We again confirmed what I was looking for, we chatted briefly about my riding weight, whether pillion and/ or luggage is routinely carried, etc., and hi ho, hi ho!, it was off to work. After I swore on a stack of Bibles that I wouldn't get in his way or want to chat constantly, Joe allowed me to stand by - not too close! - to observe and take pix. It was a very interesting experience as calm, methodical work proceeded.

As the various parts emerged from the front fork legs Joe explained the function of the various bits - springs, pistons controlling oil-flow, and so on. To my novice eyes, the new K-tech components looked as if they'd just come from a high-end Swiss watch manufacturer, beautifully finished as they were.

The rear shock was a more straightforward swap, and although I was surprised at the weight of the new Razor R shock with remote adjuster, as the OE shock was much heavier. The new unit has adjustable length, so about 10 or 12mm (half-an-inch) was wound out, lowering the bike's rear by that much after I said that I like to be able to fully flat-foot at rest, which is barely achievable with the OE unit.

Sag - which I had always believed to be what happens to a woman's breasts and a man's belly as they age (the latter has happened to me!) - was precisely measured with a cunning device as small incremental changes were made until the desired settings were reached. Joe reckons that it's rare for an owner to need to return to him for further tweaking, but of course it's there as required. After he had a short test-ride to check everything, it was my turn to ride home, with my thoughts already given after that short and brief 33km ride.

Yesterday's 181km outing along very familiar roads was intended to give me more time to evaluate things on terrain of widely-varying surfaces and conditions. There is a distinct improvement in ride quality, best explained that the sharp reactions to road surface irregularities were ironed-out and a more compliant and composed and comfortable ride eventuated. A very good example of what this means was quickly apparent, as I found that I was no longer constantly being bumped-up off the seat and inched forward until my gonads were crushed against the rear of tank: I was 'planted' more firmly in the chosen spot. Of course, larger irregularities in the road-surface - and there are plenty where I went - were still felt, and I don't want to try to convince members that this was a magic-carpet ride, but certainly it was a pleasing outcome for me.

Memories of subjective impressions are such that it would be fruitless for me to try to compare the new GT ride with that of my earlier BMW Boxer twins, which are much heavier bikes and with high-end OE components, including BMW's incomparable Telever front-end, but I am happy.

I now intend to take that planned ~1000km circuit some time in the next week or two (but not at next week's end, for it will be Friday the thirteenth!), by which time a couple of shorter outings will have put a few hundred kilometres on the new suspension and allowed everything to have bedded-down.

A very good question at this point might be - "was it worth the $2100 spent on the K-tech upgrade?". I'm fortunate enough to have spare disposable income, so while not quite a no-brainer the matter of cost was not a great concern. But others may prefer to take a different lower-cost approach, maybe getting specialists like Ride Dynamics to make changes to the OE components by simply changing oils, shims, springs, whatever, and tinkering with the adjustability of the ex-factory suspension.

The jury is still out as far as I'm concerned on whether or not I'll want/ need to buy a new BAGSTER seat to replace the GT's OE seat, which although light-years ahead of Gen1 seats is still only 'just' for me. A new BAGSTER seat would cost $450 -$550 depending on specification, but from past experience I know that it would be the cherry on top of the icing on the cake. I'll make that call after the 1000km outing in a few weeks time, but in any case they are not yet available.


P1050777.JPG a place for everything...

P1050779.JPG new Razor-R rear shock

P1050780.JPG work under way...

P1050781.JPG new (red) and old OE shocks.

P1050782.JPG spotless workshop..

P1050783.JPG draining oil from fork legs..

P1050784.JPG OE (right) and new oil-flow pistons

P1050785.JPG fork off...

P1050786.JPG new K-tech oil-flow control pistons

P1050787.JPG beautifully machined...

P1050788.JPG new rear shock installed

P1050790.JPG sag-o-meter

P1050791.JPG job done!

Edited 2 minutes ago by wordsmith
 
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