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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After stripping the cross screws that hold the lid on the reservoir on my Kawasaki KLX250 earlier today, then being told that its because those screws are in fact JIS and not Phillips, its making realize that our FZ screws are also probably JIS.

Not sure where there are many cross head screws on the FZ? I know there are two that are in same place as my KLX (The front reservoir lid ) So not wanting to cause the same problem again, I should probably invest in a set of of JIS screwdrivers.

TBH this was all news to me, after owning Jap bikes for the last 25yrs, I had honestly never heard of JIS standard.. Only PH and PZ.

Did you guys know about JIS ?

Anyway my rear lid came off easily using a phillips, but the front reservoir, just stripped almost instantly.
 

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Learned about JIS screwdrivers the hard way, too. Stripped the brake fluid reservoir screws on the TU250X a couple years back. Lesson learned; toolbox updated via Amazon.com as mentioned in an earlier post.
 

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I've heard of JIS standards for fasteners... guess it reasons there would be tools to match. Always learning, am I...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I can confirm that the FZ09 front brake reservoir is definitely JIS.. You can tell by the little dot on the screw head.

Also looking over the rest of the bike (didn't go under the tank mind) there are no other screws to worry about. But if you ever plan on changing your own brake fluid, you should invest in a set of JIS screwdrivers. Or at least one, to take those screws off without stripping them.

Had I known this prior, i'd of saved myself $25 on the easy out kit, and new screws....

$25 is the price of a JIS screwdriver set, which incidentally, are now on order. :)
 

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I can confirm that the FZ09 front brake reservoir is definitely JIS.. You can tell by the little dot on the screw head.

Also looking over the rest of the bike (didn't go under the tank mind) there are no other screws to worry about. But if you ever plan on changing your own brake fluid, you should invest in a set of JIS screwdrivers. Or at least one, to take those screws off without stripping them.

Had I known this prior, i'd of saved myself $25 on the easy out kit, and new screws....

$25 is the price of a JIS screwdriver set, which incidentally, are now on order. :)
Amazon still has some Hozan JIS-4 JIS Screwdriver Set (NEW 3rd. Gen)
 

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Head of a screw securing the airbox cover of my FZ6, note the lack of a "dot" that would indicate that it is a JIS screw.



Now, here is that screw with my Snap-On No 2 Philips screwdriver. You can see how poorly it fits in the slots of the screw.



Now, here's that same screw with my Vessel JIS #2 screwdriver. Note how snugly the screwdriver sits in the slots of the screw.



Any screw on a Japanese motorcycle is a JIS screw... dot or not.
 

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JIS screwdrivers are helpful but if misused they will still rip up screws.

It has been my experience that the biggest issue is misuse, specifically, not keeping the screwdriver straight in the screwhead as you apply torque.

The easiest way to keep the screwdriver straight was taught to me by my racing tuner 25 years ago: use a longer screwdriver, good quality screwdriver and NEVER ever use cheap or worn screwdrivers.

I use a 8" #2 phillips as my default screwdriver and almost never have a stripped screwhead.

The longer shaft gives me better leverage and better ability to keep it straight in line with the screw.

A 8" JIS screwdriver would probably be even better.
 

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ANY tool, if misused, has the potential to rip up and destroy fasteners.
 

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ANY tool, if misused, has the potential to rip up and destroy fasteners.
Very true but the point is, many people have no clue what the proper tool is for a given job or how to use properly the proper tool even if they have it handed to them.

See it all the time. Makes me cringe.

adjustable wrenches, pliers, vicegrips, etc, are tools of last resort and many reach for them first.
 
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Hmm, I have 5 different sizes and shapes of ViseGrips that I can think of. Including Channel Locks and needle nose but not crimpers 5 different pliers too.
... and how many hammers do you have?
 
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