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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guy's sorry if this might be a stupid question but I am in Canada and the Xsr700 is not available yet and as far as I know no one knows when it might be released in Canada. I am a new rider but am going through proper training courses and normally I pick things up fairly quickly and I feel that I am very cautious. Also I should mention I am absolutely in love with the xsr bikes and am pretty set on buying one for next season, and if the Xsr700 is available next season I will definitely buy that but if not... Would it be ridiculous for a new rider to buy a Xsr900???
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks a lot everyone! I really appreciate the advice and suggestions. I will be doing both beginner and advanced rider training, I really want to become a good rider and not just ride to appear "cool". I am really hoping that the Xsr700 makes it to Canada for next year, but I will keep my options open if that doesn't happen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have some dirtbike and atv experience around just off road mostly around the farm. I know this might a stupid thing to bring up because I know it's not the same at all but I've spent most of my time on two wheels on a mountain bike. Lots of mountain biking across bc. But yeah I have spent time on dirt bikes growing up. And no I'm not looking to be an idiot and try wheeling and stuff. I want to be safe and I'm almost 29 now I feel I am pretty mature. And my plan was to pretty much strictly use it in b mode till I am completely comfortable and have completed intermediate to advanced level riding programs. I very much appreciate your thoughts! ��
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Awesome, very much appreciate your thoughts and comments and honestly I have heard pretty much the same thing from a lot of riders and obviously heard the opposite opinion a lot as well! I totally understand respecting the bike. As I mentioned I mountain bike a lot and and trust me I know it doesn't take power or much speed to cause injury. Also I am about 6'3 200lbs so I don't think the seat height will be an issue for me. And if I were to get the Xsr900 I wouldn't dare ride in anything but b mode with TC on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Yeah, I've had my fair share of those moments on the mountain bike... Haha well I'm glad to hear the chances of that happening on a motorcycle is much less!
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I'm going to take a serious look at the sv and Kawasaki 650 or maybe even fz-07 I have heard is great for my situation. And yes I'm from the okanagan as well ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
That's awesome thanks man! Very much appreciate that and yeah that would be awesome going for a ride together one day. And honestly I have some time to really think hard and go through the training program and I know everyone loves the sv but I think the more I look at the fz-07 the more it makes sense... But just so many options out there. Wouldn't have to think very hard if they brought the Xsr700 over for 2017...
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
There are still a few deals out there on new 2015's as well, for example Bow Cycle in Calgary has these two.

Custom Inventory | Bow Cycle

View attachment 39417

Pre-Owned in Kelowna
Pre-Owned Inventory | Kelowna Yamaha

View attachment 39425

Just take your time and you'll find a good deal, and a lot of dealers are getting eager to sell off as many bikes as they can before the season ends. Or you might luck out and find someone looking to sell off that brand new bike, after they realised riding isn't for them.
Hey thanks buddy, I appreciate the help! I actually have been talking to the Yamaha dealership in Kelowna here and sounds like I should have some options. The fz-07 might be the winner for me, although it seems like a solid bike and all the reviews are great and it's a good looking bike. It just doesn't do what the xsr does for me when I look at it... But at the end of the day I want to be safe, enjoy riding and grow as a rider. So I know I need to make a wise decision and not rush into it. Also I have talked to 3 Yamaha dealers that say the same thing, that the Xsr900 is alot of bike but is very manageable with TC, ABS and in B mode. And that I won't get into trouble unless I'm looking for trouble and that I should definitely spend time practising my throttle control and off course take the safety program basic to advanced level... Lots of things to think about for sure
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Although TC, ABS and rider modes might save your butt, there's something to be said about dependence on electronic aids. You need to have a feel for the physics of how a motorcycle rides and what it might do should one of those electronic aids fail. I can't ding ya for wanting the bigger bike, but if ever someone is questioning "is it too much bike?". It usually is, but not to say it can't or hasn't been done. The FZ-07 is a fantastic bike for the money- I wouldn't mind having one in the stable.

Have you considered a Triumph Bonneville or something similar? It has that hipster look, too.
Yeah I briefly checked it out online, also looked at the bolt but I'm a taller guy at 6'3 200lbs and I think I would be more comfortable on a little taller seat height. And yeah I haven't heard any negative thing about the fz-07
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
The best way to see what fits best, is to hit the local bike shops and sit on a whole bunch of different bikes. That will give "you" a better idea what fits better, and what's comfortable to sit on.

If you do decide to go with a cheap small cc bike to start out on, there are some not bad deals on 250cc bikes like this one.

2012 Honda CBR 250R, 9000KM, never dropped or damaged, Yoshimura exhaust, good tires, everything in working order. Comes with tank bag, saddle bags, original exhaust, and cover. Asking Price = $2,400.00

2012 Honda CBR 250R | sport bikes | Vernon | Kijiji

Sure you could go the DRZ-400 route, but they hold their value and you'd be lucky to find a decent one for under $4,000.00

There is also bikes like this 2013 Kawasaki ER-6N - 5300 km, asking price of $4,500.00

2013 Kawasaki ER-6N - 5300km | sport bikes | Kitimat | Kijiji

There are also a couple of not bad looking SV650's, one priced not to high, is way up in Prince George????

2005 Suzuki SV650S | sport bikes | Prince George | Kijiji

It all depends on how much you have, and want, to spend on your first bike??? But no matter what it is, if it's not comfortable to ride, you are not going to enjoy it. Plus if most of your riding is going to on the highway and not just putting around town, to small a bike will suck on the highway. If I recall correctly, you mentioned you are in the Okanagan, you won't be spending all the time running around town. Since the "town" just isn't that big, lol.

I have to laugh when people say "get a small bike to start out on", since you can still kill yourself on a little 250cc if you ride like an idiot. Hence the Darwin Awards Nominees, comment I made earlier, lol.
Yeah I'm going to go visit Yamaha here in Kelowna and just kinda get a feel for a couple bikes. And yeah I'm just not sold on a 250 cc bike to develop on... I spoke to a buddy this morning who has a older cb500 that might need some work, he insisted I could just use that as long as I need and just fix her up. (not exactly sure of the type of repair required) and yeah in Kelowna I'll have some in town putting around but also a decent use of the highway and to be honest a 250 makes me nervous on the highway lol I will take a good look at the fz-07, and see how she feels also Kawasaki 650's seem to be available and as well as the xsr if I can use buddy's bike for a bit. And for everyone saying I will drop my first bike... I understand that will happen and I obviously do my best not to drop it, but I would rather fix up something I'm completely in love with than just not care if I drop it. Maybe that sounds stupid to all the experienced riders out there but that's just my thoughts. And I completely agree with your Darwinism comments and I'm not looking to pop wheelies and test top speed. I simply want a sexy beast with classic styling but modern tech, a beast that demands respect...
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
I too would start out with something used.

But I would add that you should look around and see what kind of bikes are most popular in your area and buy one of those. You know you won't keep it for a long time, and don't want to end up buying a used "starter" bike that you will have a hard time selling a few months down the road when you are ready to move up.

Another aspect of getting something used is maintenance. Learn how to work on bikes on something used where it's not as expensive to make the mistakes you are gonna make. I had to go through some wrench throwing episodes before I compiled a good set of tools and best practices. For instance a job as simple as adjusting your handle bars can turn into the worst day of your life if you don't secure a towel over your tank and you drop a wrench on it. If you do that on your starter bike, no biggie. But if you do that on your brand new XSR you are going to want to replace that $800 tank. :(
Those are valid points... I do agree about simply learning how to work on the mechanics etc would be beneficial, and I grew up on a farm working on tractors, ATVs and some dirtbikes and obviously everything is different but the bulk of skills should be transferable, regardless I won't be able to do everything but always willing to learn new things. And on a brand new bike obviously things are a lot different and I would probably bring it in for work anyways and if it's minor stuff I should be competent enough to get through it
 

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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
this was my first new bike, my others were 84 and earlier, and were not fuel injected. My observations- If you go with the xsr, keep it in b mode, and even then the acceleration can be a bit lurchy. I found myself accelerating in first and second and having the bike want to shoot out from under me, which can cause you to twist the throttle even more and then you're really flying. So you want those lessons to happen some where safe, especially through curves. Also I took mine to a parking lot several times to learn to ride and maneuver slow, and practice quick stops and swerves. 2000 miles in and I run standard mode and feel quite confident. For me the challenge was learning to go slow!
Awesome thanks for the advice! while you were learning and kinda getting used to the bike and getting used to the twitchy throttle in b mode, did you ever feel like you made a mistake or that it is too much bike, did you at any point regret your decision?
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
The power on the XSR isn't unpredictable, so I think a new rider can do fine on this bike. A smaller cc bike can be easier/safer to learn on, but it's for you to decide. I had an fz07 before the XSR900, and another bike before that. I don't know if would of been okay with the XSR900 as my first bike. Maybe I would be fine. One of the biggest safety features on the XSR is the ABS and traction control. Even though it can be argued that a rider shouldn't lean on technology and should develop their skills, there are a few riders on he FZ07.org forum that could have avoided crashes if they had ABS. It also feels good riding without the worry of locking the brakes.


Cafe Racer NYC
Thanks, I was actually considering the fz-07 instead but I know I would be out a lot of money selling it to get the xsr900 after, but I suppose that's a part of the growth process.
I might have the use of an older cb500 but it is comforting to know that the ABS and traction control do make a huge difference and obviously running in b mode for as long as I need I should be fine I think.
Obviously even in B mode that power is still there so I just need to be safe, aware and ride smart. I'm not looking wheelies or "hooliganism" I just want to ride a bike I love but I'll get some time on something smaller to start and then go make my purchase. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
I did a ninja 300 brand new cuz I didn't want uses unreliable bikes. Bad choice cuz it was new. Great choice to learn with. Hopped on a fz07 and it's fine. You will more than likely drop it at least once so I get frame sliders for what ever you choose to help with that. My girl got a CBR 600 rr after riding the 300 for 7 months and dropped it. Thankfully for frame sliders just needed a mirror

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
Good call! And I'm glad the cbr was relatively undamaged
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
My 2c worth as someone who instructs learners and assesses them...

Get a bike you like and that suits the type of riding you think you want to do. The more you love your bike the more you will want to ride it.

Despite what you might read, you dont have to crash. Many people happily progress without crashing :)

Practise throttle control and safe braking. Practise a lot. A tip your instructor will probably show you is to ensure your throttle hand is held with the knuckles high and the wrist low. You then turn the throttle by lowering your wrist which promotes smoothness. You also automatically close the throttle when you rotate your hand forward so the fingers reach the front brake lever.

Get ABS brakes if you have the option. The learners I assess that use ABS brakes are generally much smoother, more controlled and quicker brakers than those without it. With ABS the learner is more confident in smoothly and progressively braking harder as they slow down since they arent subconsciously worried about a front wheel lockup.

Here in Australia naked bikes are MUCH cheaper to insure than sports bikes, so I would compare your insurance quotes if you are choosing between models.

If you are sensible you could ride pretty well any bike when learning, but I would suggest that the xsr900 is not the best way to get yourself started. Something a little less powerful will help you improve faster because you will gain confidence. For example a couple of our other instructors have ridden the mt07/fz07 learner version we have here in Australia on a track day and they raved about them, saying they are plenty of bike not just for learners but even for experienced riders.

If you are mainly riding around town, a small bike will suffice such as a 250-300cc. On the highway they get a bit buzzy so a 400-700 would be more comfortable. I commuted for a year on a 250 on the freeway so it is doable but a 650 was nicer.

If you like the xsr900 i think the fz07 or xsr700 with ABS would be a better bike to learn on, while still being something you will enjoy for some time to come.
Yes I am taking a serious look at the fz-07/mt-07 and in North America we don't have the Xsr700 available yet otherwise my decision would be a lot easier haha
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
I apologize in advance if this is a stupid question as I am still learning things...
Would something like the G2 throttle tamer make sense, and work for the xsr900?
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
The G2 simply changes the take up rate for the throttle cable. This is very helpful with some bikes that are not smooth at small throttle openings. It allows greater movement for smaller openings giving a bit better control. The XSR has a very linear throttle. By being so linear it makes control very easy.

I personally do not think it would help. It would make it less linear. Being very linear makes it very predictable.
Oh ok, that totally makes sense. Thanks for explaining that!
 
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