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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guy's sorry if this might be a stupid question but I am in Canada and the Xsr700 is not available yet and as far as I know no one knows when it might be released in Canada. I am a new rider but am going through proper training courses and normally I pick things up fairly quickly and I feel that I am very cautious. Also I should mention I am absolutely in love with the xsr bikes and am pretty set on buying one for next season, and if the Xsr700 is available next season I will definitely buy that but if not... Would it be ridiculous for a new rider to buy a Xsr900???
 

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Many times new riders make mistakes that lead to unintentional dismounts and the dropping of ones beautiful and beloved motorcycle.

in that regard i always advise new riders to purchase a solid used motorcycle to gain the experience required to avoid these mistakes..... something that wont break the bank if you happen to throw it down the road or just drop it in a parking lot. a good dual sport would be my first advice.

But if you have the coin and desire a brand new motorcycle then i say purchase what you want.....Life is too short....its just a motorcycle.... you desire to be a rider..... a true rider is always in control of his /her machine...... you are in control of the throttle so the motorcycle will not do anything that you do not direct it to do......... period.

take the time for basic rider training courses.... take the time for advanced rider training courses and spend some time on a track to give your riding skills a chance to mature before you start mixing it up with 4 wheel death machines on the road.

I cannot over state this. You do not want to be figuring out/ or even thinking about how to control a motorcycle while also dealing with distracted drivers who are trying their level best to kill you......
 

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IMHO, yes. You may read that the "fueling issues" of the FZ09 have been resolved, but just as some other bikes, I find the throttle twitchy or sensitive WHEN COMPARED TO OTHER BIKES :) To me this means it isn't forgiving of mistakes that new riders make.

This is in addition to new bike, first bike might fall over :)
 

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You will be so much better off, and happier in the long run, if you start with a little less "bike".

At the end of the day, anyone can buy what they want, and your bike is an individual choice.

My two cents... Start off with a Twin under 700cc. Can't go wrong with either the fz07 or sv650. I don't know much about the ninja 650 but I'm sure its a fine machine. Any of these bikes are still plenty enough to get you in trouble on the street and a hoot to ride.

Your average non motorcycling cager doesnt know the difference between a 650 twin, a 900 triple, or a 1000 i4. If you're out to impress people you will find that most will compliment your bike no matter what you ride or they won't bat an eye. You will however get a chance to hone some skills and get familiar with the nuances of street riding (much different that street DRIVING).

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Your average non motorcycling cager doesnt know the difference between a 650 twin, a 900 triple, or a 1000 i4. If you're out to impress people you will find that most will compliment your bike no matter what you ride or they won't bat an eye. You will however get a chance to hone some skills and get familiar with the nuances of street riding (much different that street DRIVING).

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Good point about people knowing nothing about bikes. Even a lot of bike people don't know much about bikes. For cagers, if it's not a 'Busa or a 'Literbike' (well...maybe a Ducati) then they aren't impressed. As a well informed bike person, I can tell you that one of the main things that impresses me is to see a new rider on a reasonable bike wearing all the gear and not doing squidly things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks a lot everyone! I really appreciate the advice and suggestions. I will be doing both beginner and advanced rider training, I really want to become a good rider and not just ride to appear "cool". I am really hoping that the Xsr700 makes it to Canada for next year, but I will keep my options open if that doesn't happen.
 

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I've been doing rider training for 10 years and I *strongly* recommend you get a nice, cheap, "beater" (ex250, gs500, similar inexpensive and readily available model) for your first season of riding. There should be plenty to choose from. And ride the snot out of it - all weather save snow, all temps, all road types. Then in late fall/early winter 2017 you can score an XSR700 or similar object of your true desire.
 

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Buying a bike that is too big increases the chance of crashing due to too much power for noob riding skills, even noob riding skills "tempered by maturity"*.

A too big bike is intimidating and increases your anxiety which increases your chances of crashing.

A too big bike is more expensive to insure.

A too big bike is harder to learn how to ride.

A too big bike that is also a new bike will make you overly anxious about dropping it and thus increasing the likelihood that you will drop it.

Usually the larger the bike, the more expensive the cost of repairs.


*In US, the largest demographic for motorcycle crashes, 44%, are in the 40+ age bracket. So much for "maturity".


I highly recommend your first bike be cheap, used, predropped and that you ride it for a season before you buy what you think you want.

At this point you only think you know what you want and what riding is about. After riding for a season, you might decide a cruiser or an adventure bike is what you want. An XSR is neither.

Go buy some UJM like a 650 Versys or a SV650 or similar generic, common, cheap bike that is 650 twin or smaller ad not a 600 supersport.
 
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I just upgraded my Kawasaki Er6n which was my pride and joy for six years. I bought it when I turned 40yrs to get back into riding. I have to say it was a brilliant budget bike option. Plenty of torque from the parallel twin motor, great thru the twisties and plenty of bike for getting out at the weekends to have fun. It was a bit rough around the edges but a great bike for getting started.
 

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Bike has 3 ride modes. Keep it in the B mode. If what you say is true and you are cautious you will be all right, until you're not …….It's funny because the xsr900 is a wolf in sheeps clothing. The bike a straight rocket disguised as a friendly retro machine. If you are a cautious person, you will stay away from this bike and start small. It will be more fun anyways looking forward to progressing in size.
 

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All the people pushing the too much power are missing the point. You can set it in B mode and have the characteristics of a smaller machine.

The issue is you will drop it. Period. You might even crash it. That is simple fact. Most accidents happen in the first 12 months of riding. Do you want to do this to a new machine? Or an older starter bike, get some experience, then get a nicer machine?

The other point is your taste will change as you start riding. You may fall in love with XSR now, then find you like racing and want a full on race replica, or cruiser, or dual sport. Getting something cheap lets you figure that out with out a cash outlay.



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I am a new rider but am going through proper training courses
It's the determination that places you in the choice of suggestions of wasting money buying junk bikes, or save that money for the dream bike, or stick with the nightmare leaking in the garage making a decision on some of the suggestions.

and normally I pick things up fairly quickly and I feel that I am very cautious.
That sold me. In 15 minutes you'll be acclimated to any bike you're on. The quick learn is already at the school and what to look for. Yeah, are we hand/eye coordinated as to being settled in to the moves? Come on, don't lie. You be lying down on your back in bed, counting shifts like playing air guitar, right? I think you're ready, you can't wait.

and am pretty set on buying one for next season
Lucky you. All that anticipation, the many visits to the dealer just for entertainment. The hard choice is coming down to the wire. Make no mistake, some can ride and some need to be weened in. I do not see the OP needing a little wet bike weening. It's all about the head game and the confidence game.
 

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I grew up with dirtbikes and atvs. My first motorcycle was a yahama r6 next bike was a Ducati I've ridden r1 and many other sport bikes. If you grew up with dirtbikes you can ride most bikes if you have a good head on your shoulders and learn your limits. With that said even a sport bike like an R6 is much easier to ride than a xsr900 the taller center of gravity make bikes feel more intimidating than lower center of gravity sport bikes. Handling is also more twitchy do to the light front end and low end Torque. The xsr900 is alot for a first bike. I honestly think even a liter bike sport bike is easier to learn on. Just my 2 cents.

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Lot of advice on here! My suggestion is much like everyone else's but I'll add one piece. If I were doing it again I'd get something I didn't mind dropping and play with it in parking lots and such just to make maneuvers and stopping type events second nature and if I drop it low speed in a lot no biggy. One thing about getting your "dream bike" is you will take it that much easier which could actually make you more prone to dropping it. I'd find some dirt/adv bike with a crash cage and just have fun.

I do not however strictly believe the xsr/fz is too much for a first rider but you'll probably have more fun starting on something you don't mind scratching up first.

There is a learning curve and you will either take much longer to learn or learn in a less desirable way.


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Yes there is no sign of the XSR700 or that new MT-09 Tracer coming to North America??? I figure if they don't bring them to North America by January, we won't see them over here any time soon, but that is just my guess, lol.

One question I have to ask is, do you have zero riding experience? or lots of dirt bike riding under your belt? I ask because dirt biking is a great way to start out and learn how to ride. You will find tons of old dirt bikers on here, that made the transition to street riding.

This would be the perfect time to pick up a cheap used bike and ride it for the rest of the riding season. Plus get some good saddle time in to practise what you learned in your riding course.

Then you can take your time hunting down a good deal on an old 2016 XSR900, as the new 2017's come out. Since most dealers always put the old stock up for sale when the new bikes start showing up. For example a local dealer here had the 2015 FZ-09 on sale for $1000.00 less, when the 2016 FZ-09's showed up. A great deal if you weren't to picky on what colour the bike was.

And yes, there have been a lot of first time riders who have survived buying an FZ-09 as their first street bike. The big three thing that helped them survive, are as follows:

#1) They took a good motorcycle safety riding course, and actually listened to the good instructors. They didn't just take the course in hopes of cheaper insurance.

#2) They road the bikes in B-Mode until they got use to it, respected the power of the machine and didn't drive like idiots. If you are looking for a wheelie machine, go buy a cheap a dirt bike first.

#3) They didn't suffer from the dreaded Superman Syndrome, and actually have that rare gene called Common Sense or a healthy fear of dying, lol.

P.S. - A good friend of mine road years ago, riding his friends street bikes when he didn't have a motorcycle license. Go ahead 20 years later and the riding bug bit him again. So this spring he took a good motorcycle safety training course. After passing the course he picked up a 2015 FZ-09 at a great spring and proceeded to ride in B-Mode for the first couple months. Now he rides to work every day he can, and rides as much as he can. So yes, a new rider can hadle a new FZ-09, FJ-09 or XSR900, as long as they respect the bike and don't ride like a moron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have some dirtbike and atv experience around just off road mostly around the farm. I know this might a stupid thing to bring up because I know it's not the same at all but I've spent most of my time on two wheels on a mountain bike. Lots of mountain biking across bc. But yeah I have spent time on dirt bikes growing up. And no I'm not looking to be an idiot and try wheeling and stuff. I want to be safe and I'm almost 29 now I feel I am pretty mature. And my plan was to pretty much strictly use it in b mode till I am completely comfortable and have completed intermediate to advanced level riding programs. I very much appreciate your thoughts! ��
 

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There are lots of Darwin Award Nominees, who have been riding for years with a bad attitude. It's just pure dumb luck that they have survived as long as they have???

Having the right attitude is way more important than just years of experience being a Darwin Award Nominee, lol.
 
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