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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
1) Do I need to coat the new bolts in anti-seize? The instructions say to do this if the bolts are going into aluminium, I'm not sure if that's the case.

2) What's the torque setting for tightening the engine bolts? I've looked through the manual, but can't find the specifications.

Thanks!
 

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1) Yes. I used loctite blue. I put it on everything I plan on having to possibly remove again at a later date.

2) Didn't use a torque setting myself. I do have a 1/2" drive torque wrench but I did not bust it out for this particular job since I had no spec. I tightened it by feel. I've done this with all of the bikes I've put sliders on.

Remember, with those woodcrafts the one with the longer base is the left side one. I got them and put them on a week ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Weapon!

I just noticed that the two bolts that came with the sliders are 80mm and 70mm, this seems a bit short? From what I have read on here they should be 90mm at least?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys, do you know off hand what tool/bit I need to disengage the stock engine bolts? This is pretty new to me.
 

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The engine mount bolts by the lower corners of the radiator? 33 ft pounds. I didn't see it say anything about Loctite etc, but maybe I missed it. Unless I hear otherwise I'll use blue Loctite.
Agreed. Blue loctite. "I put that $#!+ on everything" lol.

Thanks guys, do you know off hand what tool/bit I need to disengage the stock engine bolts? This is pretty new to me.
Simple hex socket for a socket wrench will do.
 

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What do you have? 1/2 inch ratchet and a socket? If that isn't a enough leverage you can slide a piece of pipe onto the ratchet handle, or you can buy a 1/2 inch breaker bar that has a longer handle than the ratchet.

To put the slider on you'll need an extension to reach the socket into the slider.
My socket was long enough as-is. And I was able to break it with a 3/8" ratchet. 1/2" wasn't needed, much less a breaker bar.
 

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The torque to loosen was low enough to use an Allen key. Loctite is not antisieze, use blue loctite. The woodcraft base is shallow enough to use the short side of the Allen key. The bolts they provide are the correct length, compare them to the ones you take out, after spaced out by the base. Installation is very easy
 

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Thanks guys, do you know off hand what tool/bit I need to disengage the stock engine bolts? This is pretty new to me.
The slider hardware (stock engine bolt and puck) uses 8mm and 5mm hex. I used a 1/2" drive ratchet, 1/2" to 3/8" adapter, and 3/8" drive 8mm hex bit socket for the engine bolt removal. Torque wrench for the installation.
 

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blue loctite and anti-sieze compound are 2 DIFFERENT products that do exactly the OPPOSITE thing..... they are NOT INTERCHANGEABLE!
 

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I used anti-seize on my bolts. Loctite is the wrong product here if you ask me. Tightened to the correct torque you should have no worries about them coming out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So I am confused now, we should be using anti seize and not the blue-loctite? ie Loctite Threadlocker Blue 242 Adhesive | Canadian Tire

The stuff says it is removable and for use with parts that require disassembly with hand tools...?

Maybe my interpretation is off

Loctite® Threadlocker Blue 242® is designed for the locking and sealing of threaded fasteners which require normal disassembly with standard hand tools. The product cures when confined in the absence of air between close fitting metal surfaces. It protects threads from rust and corrosion and prevents loosening from shock and vibration. Loctite® Threadlocker Blue 242® is particularly suited for applications on less active substrates such as stainless steel and plated surfaces, where disassembly is required for servicing.
 

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You're putting a steel or stainless steel bolt into an aluminum hole. Those two dissimilar metals will oxidize and seize together. Anti seize has nothing to do with keeping the bolt from working loose and everything to do with...... Anti seizure of the bolt as a result of reactions between the two metals.
 

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Agreed. When two dissimilar metals are in contact and you add water, you get galvanic corrosion that can accelerate corrosion of the aluminum, and tends to fuse the joint together making later removal very difficult at best.
 
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Eh...I used blue loctite. Does anyone know if thread inserts are used in the frame?

I always thought that the alum/stainless seize issues were due to stainless' tendency to gall.
I have seen it happen, only with 6061 aluminum, and small fasteners....and this happened pretty much right after installation.

Good luck to us all

...oh, if you ever have a seized bolt, try using penetrating lubricant and an impact wrench...this will tend to get it out better than static torque (hand wrench or ratchet)
Of course the impact wrench could break the screw as well if its completely frozen
 

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When you guys removed the original bolts did it have any loctite or anti seize? For that large of a bolt if it is torqued properly you should be fine. I would not put anti seize on those unless factory put some as well. If you put loctite you will be fine with no problems as long as its the blue.
 
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