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Modern motorcycle tires are tubeless radial tires. If you want a 50/50 street / track tire you can just go with the tire that's already on the bike. The rear will only last like 3000 miles. Some guys are replacing even sooner that that. You could go to a slightly harder compound tire and get more life out of it. There are lots of tire threads here on the forum.
 

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I would take it into a qualified shop. At least the wheels. When you mount new tires they should get balanced. I do all my maintenance. But when it comes to tires let the pros handle it. It's only like $20 if you bring the wheels
 

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not trying to be rude, but if you read the text on the sidewall of the tire I believe it says 'tubeless'
 
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not trying to be rude, but if you read the text on the sidewall of the tire I believe it says 'tubeless'
It says, or said, the same thing on my Triumph Thruxton, but it most assuredly is tubed. Just because it says "tubeless" on the tyre doesn't necessarily mean it's fitted as such.
 

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It says, or said, the same thing on my Triumph Thruxton, but it most assuredly is tubed. Just because it says "tubeless" on the tyre doesn't necessarily mean it's fitted as such.
The Thruxton has wire wheels. That is why it has tubes. The expense of sealing the rim is more than they wanted to go to.
 

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Yes, but his point was that just because the tire says tubeless doesn't mean that it is being ran that way, so telling someone to go read the sidewall of their tire doesn't always work.
 

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The Thruxton has wire wheels. That is why it has tubes. The expense of sealing the rim is more than they wanted to go to.
Yes, thank you Doug, I was aware of that.

Yes, but his point was that just because the tire says tubeless doesn't mean that it is being ran that way, so telling someone to go read the sidewall of their tire doesn't always work.
My point exactly, thank you.
 

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okay, okay.. you are all right. What I should of said is read the owners manual.
 

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Whether it is on the sidewall or the owner's manual, people still can put tubes inside tubeless tires. I think a lot of ADV riders do it (if they are running alloys)- what are the thoughts on that on this forum?

I think it could be a second line of defense where sealing tubes (with stuff like slime etc) are easier? Having ridden bikes with steel rims and running tubes, I found it cheaper to fix or replace the tubes (at a shop) than taking a chance on plugs on tubeless (even if more convenient to do it at home and even running them for more than 3000 miles after) or replacing tires after each flat. Also, less chances of damaging steel rims when trying to open it up?

ps: Still running on the stock S20s, nearly 4000 miles and treads still holding up pretty well! Next change probably Conti trail attacks.
 

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I wouldn't as you are adding unneeded unsprung weight as well as extra heat from the additional friction from tube and tire rub. Most of your offroad guys put up with the tubes because of the abuse the wheels take hitting objects that can bend the rims and break the seals. It's actually easier when dealing with puncture flats if you don't have tubes. If you are doing mainly street duty I would stick with tubeless.
 

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Running tubes in a tubeless tire on a wheel that doesn't require tubes is just silly for most applications.

If I have a flat on a tubeless tire, I plug it and keep riding. Problem solved in very short time: 5-10 minutes or less.

If a plug won't seal the hole, I might install another plug or more to get going again but then I replace the tire ASAP.

If you don't like plugs, you CAN patch the tire from the inside which is a lot easier than pulling a tube, patching the tube and reinstalling the tube.

If you use a tube the tire probably won't be properly balanced (bad), will weigh more (also bad), and will not hold air as well as a tubeless tire (less reliable).

If you pick up a nail in a tubeless tire and the nail stays in the tire, you might have a slow leak or no leak at all. When you discover the nail you can pull the nail, plug the hole and move on.

If there was a tube inside that tubeless tire, the nail would punch a hole in the tube and the tube will leak the air out around the valve stem since the tube's valve stem isn't sealed to the rim, like the tubeless valve stem is. Plus you must remove the wheel from the bike, remove the tire from the wheel, pull the tube, patch or replace the tube, reinstall in reverse order.

If I was putting that much effort in, why not just replace the tire or at least patch the tire from the inside.

The only reason I can see to use a tube is so you can run very low air pressures (15 psi or less) which is something you might do on an adventure bike to handle some offroad work.

Without the tube, you are likely to accidentally "break the bead" on the tire at such low pressures when you ride over a sharp edge such as a rock or drop down a significant drop.

If you plan to use your FZ09 in serious offroad work, you will need a lot more than tubes: a good skid plate is the first thing I would be looking for.

To the OP, every person you ask will have a different opinion on tires.

For an average rider the stock tires are OK but more expensive than they are worth. Pirelli Angels are good, better mileage, similar tires, not quite as sticky but better in the wet than the stock S20s. Michelin PR2, PR3 and latest is the PR4 are good tires with decent grip and mileage.

If you are more aggressive rider that puts a lot of front end load (like braking deep into corners and such), then you want a good sportbike tire on the front if not on the front and rear. But realize sportbike tires don't last more than about 2-2.5k miles and some can be gone very quickly.

Good sportbike tires are also typically not such great wet weather tires so if you have a lot of rain where you live, then that may not be a good idea for you either.

BTW, if you think you want to change the tires yourself, I suggest you don't the first time and instead, take the wheels off the bike, take it to the shop and watch them install the tires. Motorcycle tires are very different animals than bicycle tires.
 
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