Yamaha FZ-09 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Its getting chilly in NYC and I received my Oxford touring heated grips from Twisted Throttle last week. I was trying to install them this weekend but none of the hex screwdrivers seen to work to remove the bar-end weights. The one with the bike is useless- works only for some of the underseat screws. Any of you guys know what tool/# screw head I would need to open the bar end weights so that I can slip off the grips and start my install?

Thanks!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,700 Posts
8mm Allen wrench
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
That's odd I tried everything from 4 to 8mm...maybe I need to try a new set again?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
That's odd I tried everything from 4 to 8mm...maybe I need to try a new set again?
Is it possible that there are star drive bolts on some ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
Yeah the weight seems like it has a weird hole like a small one inside and a larger one outside,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
I used a standard allen key to fill the big hole... Initially i thought that little hole inside was a torx wrench but that little star pattern hole inside is nothing, just use sae allen key on big hole and put some torque behind it and it will pop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts
The ball end type help, did have some thread lock on mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,168 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
8mm Hex is the key. I should have updated. I used a Titan Dual Head Flex Ratchet and got some standard and metrics bits.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,330 Posts
The ball end type help, did have some thread lock on mine.
A lot of people do not know how to use tools and I have been teaching this for 25-30 years.

Proper maintenance begins with using proper tools for the job.

Ball end allen wrenches are to be avoided except in situations where no other choice works because ball end allen wrenches cannot handle high torque situations without deforming (stripping) the bolt head.

The bar ends are secured with blue locktite from the factory and require quite a bit of torque to get loose.

An 8mm allen socket engages much more surface area inside the 8mm socket head than a ball type allen can.

Improper use of tools just destroys fasteners for no good reason and causes increased wear and tear, maintenance and cost.

I used to bitch and complain about cheap crap screws on my bikes back in the early 80s, until someone introduced me to a good screwdriver from snap-on that properly fit the screws and then magically, the screw heads stopped stripping out. All #2 phillips screw drivers are not equal.

Learned a similar lesson why 6 point sockets are far superior to 12 point in almost every application and don't damage the nuts and bolts nearly as easily are 12 point sockets do.

The new tools being pushed these days with the rounded nipples inside are 2-3x as bad on nuts and bolts as 12 point sockets.

Treat your motorcycle with care and use the correct tools for the job.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Thantos

·
Registered
Joined
·
833 Posts
A lot of people do not know how to use tools and I have been teaching this for 25-30 years.

Proper maintenance begins with using proper tools for the job.

Ball end allen wrenches are to be avoided except in situations where no other choice works because ball end allen wrenches cannot handle high torque situations without deforming (stripping) the bolt head.

The bar ends are secured with blue locktite from the factory and require quite a bit of torque to get loose.

An 8mm allen socket engages much more surface area inside the 8mm socket head than a ball type allen can.

Improper use of tools just destroys fasteners for no good reason and causes increased wear and tear, maintenance and cost.

I used to bitch and complain about cheap crap screws on my bikes back in the early 80s, until someone introduced me to a good screwdriver from snap-on that properly fit the screws and then magically, the screw heads stopped stripping out. All #2 phillips screw drivers are not equal.

Learned a similar lesson why 6 point sockets are far superior to 12 point in almost every application and don't damage the nuts and bolts nearly as easily are 12 point sockets do.

The new tools being pushed these days with the rounded nipples inside are 2-3x as bad on nuts and bolts as 12 point sockets.

Treat your motorcycle with care and use the correct tools for the job.
Thanks for the lesson. The stock bar ends are concave on the inside. No stripping or damage of any sort here. This style of hex key was recommended to me by a well known tuner/ex world record holder (drag racer) . I believe he is pretty credible also. Again, for that specific type of Allen head. Too each their own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
A lot of people do not know how to use tools and I have been teaching this for 25-30 years.

Proper maintenance begins with using proper tools for the job.

Ball end allen wrenches are to be avoided except in situations where no other choice works because ball end allen wrenches cannot handle high torque situations without deforming (stripping) the bolt head.

The bar ends are secured with blue locktite from the factory and require quite a bit of torque to get loose.

An 8mm allen socket engages much more surface area inside the 8mm socket head than a ball type allen can.

Improper use of tools just destroys fasteners for no good reason and causes increased wear and tear, maintenance and cost.

I used to bitch and complain about cheap crap screws on my bikes back in the early 80s, until someone introduced me to a good screwdriver from snap-on that properly fit the screws and then magically, the screw heads stopped stripping out. All #2 phillips screw drivers are not equal.

Learned a similar lesson why 6 point sockets are far superior to 12 point in almost every application and don't damage the nuts and bolts nearly as easily are 12 point sockets do.

The new tools being pushed these days with the rounded nipples inside are 2-3x as bad on nuts and bolts as 12 point sockets.

Treat your motorcycle with care and use the correct tools for the job.

So just wondering before I strip my bar end. Do these go clockwise or counter. I have really pushed on it counterclockwise and haven't gotten it to bust that thread lock. I am afraid of stripping it. This is on the throttle side. The other came off no problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,008 Posts
The bar end threads are normal, so counter clockwise to remove. Maybe one side got a bit more Loctite etc.

Regards ball end Allen keys, they are meant for when you don't have a straight shot at the bolt. I use them that way, not for high torque and haven't had a problem. For high torque it's nice to have the Allen sockets you can use on your ratchet etc, I also use them with a T handle. Have had 3/8 inch drive metric Allen sockets for a long time and just added 1/4 drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
If they are really tite, that may be due to locktite. Heating (with a heat gun) will weaken locktite and that helps sometimes.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
739 Posts
This thread has bothered me for a while. :confused:

Need to replace my bar ends. Incase anyone else is confused... There IS a smaller 4mm hex bolt head inside. On the bar end itself (bigger hole) is the 8mm hex.

Haven't started the work yet, don't know what the smaller one is for. A lock nut? Doesn't seem to matter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,757 Posts
You want to use the large part it is 8mm..that was one of the first things I had to remove to change out the crappy stock grips and mine came loose very easy...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
739 Posts
Yeah, a little muscle and both came off easy. That smaller bolt must just hold weight inside. Doesn't need to be removed if just changing the bar end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
Improper use of tools just destroys fasteners for no good reason and causes increased wear and tear, maintenance and cost.

I used to bitch and complain about cheap crap screws on my bikes back in the early 80s, until someone introduced me to a good screwdriver from snap-on that properly fit the screws and then magically, the screw heads stopped stripping out. All #2 phillips screw drivers are not equal.
That's because the cross head screws on Japanese vehicles are JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) pattern and not Phillips.
Phillips is pretty close but not identical.
JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) | Screwdrivers | Hand Tools | VESSEL TOOLS

As for the "smaller hex" in the stock weights:The weights are one piece steel items.The apparent smaller hex is the result of metal being pushed into the base of the hole when an 8mm hex swage was forced into the weight to form the 8mm socket.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top