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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, i rode most of the winter- the moment they cleaned up the snow and ice on the road, I was back out. Whatever the temperature was. I washed the bike in freezing cold and got out most of the salt.
Now, after the final snow storm, having ridden one day and then another in rain, the corrosion is a bit out of control. Images below from various parts- might hurt the sensibilities of a few-




Last year i had wiped the points clean with water and then added waterproof grease. It seems worse this year (more snow, more salt). After last night's ride in the rain, the chains also have rusted more than ever before.
So, does anyone have any suggestions how to fix this?

Has anyone used ACF-50?

All advice is welcome.
 

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Dude! Hats off to you for riding all winter especially with what they were showing NYC got but, I believe that is all salt damage and things will just need to be replaced. Salt and aluminum don't mix.

I always wondered why everything that runs at Bonneville looks like a pile, then I figured it out.
 

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Powdercoat what you can and get new brake lines (Galfer) with chromed steel banjos. That Salt-Away looks good. Bare and anodized aluminum corrode at the sight of salt.

Props for riding all winter, you da man.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the suggestions.
I heard about Salt away but does it work? Last winter wasn't as harsh on the bike I think.

And what about the chain? Will a simple chain cleaning session work?
 

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While on this subject.. you should unscrew the chain adjuster bolts and apply some anti-seize to them .. before they get welded sorta speak to the swing arm .. I do believe the right side is exposed on the inside of the swing arm...on my buddy's fz1 broke off in the swing arm and it was not fun to repair....
 

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We use acf-50 in the aviation industry. It works well but like most light oils will creep all over, that's why it works. We also use this greasy cpc (corrosion prevention compound) stuff we call black bear. It works great but stays gooey and could wipe off on your clothing etc. Remember, paint will prevent corrosion. Even if you brushed it on it would look better then those parts look now!
 

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Clean the chain up and see how it goes. However, don't put the bike in gear and run a rag along the chain to clean it up. Seems obvious, yes, but a friend of mine lost 2 fingers last year doing that. Caught the rag and sucked his fingers through the rear sprocket.
 

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This is the reason I stopped riding my nice bikes during the winter unless it's completely dry. Even then, I always rinse off the salt dust after the ride. If you really want to be upset, take a look at the bare machined surfaces (like around the steering stem, etc.) and suspension bearings. One of two winters is usually enough to wreck havoc on the seals and make them gritty. If you're going to ride in the salt, you'll need to do some prep. As others have mentioned, there are some options. Personally, I use a generous helping of Green Grease wherever it matters. It's ugly when it's on there, but it works and is waterproof.

In the meantime, do yourself a favor and pull the axles to make sure there is no corrosion on the axle themselves or the threaded fork lower. If you decide to grease the threads (I do), drop your torque spec by about 25% to avoid overloading the wheel bearings.

I'm still in completely amazement that the Pilgrims decided to stay in the northeast after the first winter. That should have been our clue.
 

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Start gently, using a toothbrush and wd40. If that doesn't work, you can always get more aggressive with it. You can try abrasive cloth, you could use scotch brite; white is softest, then green, and then red. If that doesn't work, the parts that are easily removed can be taken for soda blasting. It's like sandblasting, but the medium is a fine powder. Glass beading is next, if soda doesn't work. Paint when you're done, using a rust reducing primer and top coat for steel. Rallyon is right about afc50, but you wouldn't want to see it coating all the various corrosion prone parts on your bike. This takes time, but I believe your patience will serve you well in this instance.
 

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While on this subject.. you should unscrew the chain adjuster bolts and apply some anti-seize to them .. before they get welded sorta speak to the swing arm .. I do believe the right side is exposed on the inside of the swing arm...on my buddy's fz1 broke off in the swing arm and it was not fun to repair....
+1 to that.
Same thing happened with my cr125. Not fun at all. Took many, many hours to get out
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
While on this subject.. you should unscrew the chain adjuster bolts and apply some anti-seize to them .. before they get welded sorta speak to the swing arm .. I do believe the right side is exposed on the inside of the swing
arm...on my buddy's fz1 broke off in the swing arm and it was not fun to repair....
Will do that this weekend when I can take apart the bike a bit.

We use acf-50 in the aviation industry. It works well but like most light oils will creep all over, that's why it works. We also use this greasy cpc (corrosion prevention compound) stuff we call black bear. It works great but stays gooey and could wipe off on your clothing etc. Remember, paint will prevent corrosion. Even if you brushed it on it would look better then those parts look now!
I usually tend to use rustoleum to cover treated rusted parts. Maybe that should work. I will do that and treat the other parts with ACF50 then- is the spray the same as the concentrate?

Clean the chain up and see how it goes. However, don't put the bike in gear and run a rag along the chain to clean it up. Seems obvious, yes, but a friend of mine lost 2 fingers last year doing that. Caught the rag and sucked his fingers through the rear sprocket.
Chain is clean now- did it today before going to work. Not all silvery but all surface corrosion is gone. How do you guys get rid of the dark spots? WD40? I get conflicting reports about using it on O-rings.


This is the reason I stopped riding my nice bikes during the winter unless it's completely dry. Even then, I always rinse off the salt dust after the ride. If you really want to be upset, take a look at the bare machined surfaces (like around the steering stem, etc.) and suspension bearings. One of two winters is usually enough to wreck havoc on the seals and make them gritty. If you're going to ride in the salt, you'll need to do some prep. As others have mentioned, there are some options. Personally, I use a generous helping of Green Grease wherever it matters. It's ugly when it's on there, but it works and is waterproof.

In the meantime, do yourself a favor and pull the axles to make sure there is no corrosion on the axle themselves or the threaded fork lower. If you decide to grease the threads (I do), drop your torque spec by about 25% to avoid overloading the wheel bearings.

I'm still in completely amazement that the Pilgrims decided to stay in the northeast after the first winter. That should have been our clue.

I have been good about rinsing off the bike after riding in the winters- the forks and shocks are the first thing I clean up. Will do a more thorough clean up this weekend. It helps that it will be warmer.


Start gently, using a toothbrush and wd40. If that doesn't work, you can always get more aggressive with it. You can try abrasive cloth, you could use scotch brite; white is softest, then green, and then red. If that doesn't work, the parts that are easily removed can be taken for soda blasting. It's like sandblasting, but the medium is a fine powder. Glass beading is next, if soda doesn't work. Paint when you're done, using a rust reducing primer and top coat for steel. Rallyon is right about afc50, but you wouldn't want to see it coating all the various corrosion prone parts on your bike. This takes time, but I believe your patience will serve you well in this instance.
Very helpful tips there- will give it a shot this weekend. Cleaned up the parts and coated some of the moving points with waterproof grease for now till Sunday (saturday is rain and have to be all over town).

If nothing works, will go to a garage/detailing center. Lets see how it goes.

Thank you everyone for your invaluable feedback.
 

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Chain is clean now- did it today before going to work. Not all silvery but all surface corrosion is gone. How do you guys get rid of the dark spots? WD40? I get conflicting reports about using it on O-rings.
Those dark spots are probably there to stay unless you use Scotchbrite to clean up each link. Even then, you will likely be left with some spots. If you're going to ride in all weather, I highly recommend a good automatic chain oiling system. You'll forget all about this cleaning and lubing nonsense (unless you forget to fill the reservoir).
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Those dark spots are probably there to stay unless you use Scotchbrite to clean up each link. Even then, you will likely be left with some spots. If you're going to ride in all weather, I highly recommend a good automatic chain oiling system. You'll forget all about this cleaning and lubing nonsense (unless you forget to fill the reservoir).
Funny, I was thinking about the same thing when I posted the thread. Which ones would you recommend? I saw a super simple one from Aerostitch- I like simple things and that's why it appealed to me over systems like the Scottoiler (which also is major bank).

Also how well do these systems last in different temperatures/terrain etc?
 

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I was one who rejected the idea of a chain oiler for many years. I cannot emphasize how wrong I was.

I haven't used the Loobman, but it's an affordable solution if you are good with remembering to give it a squeeze. I like that I don't need to think about it more than when I add the oil. I recently added a 'Lube Tube' to expand the system capacity even more. By my calculation, I should be able to go about 2000-2500 miles between refills. FWIW, I have the older/cheaper V System, not the electronic unit. If you spend a lot of time idling or crawling in traffic, the e-system might be the ticket.
 

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wow, that sux... did you ride in the winter out of necessity or fun?

I would be more worried about what you can't see.. the FZ-09 frame has lots of little crevices all over where this stuff could be festering un-noticed. If it was my bike I would tear it down to the frame go over each part then re-assemble. Sure its a bit of a restoration project, but before you do that you have to ask yourself how long you plan on owning the bike?

Best of luck with the repairs, i'm curious how much this project is going to set you back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I was one who rejected the idea of a chain oiler for many years. I cannot emphasize how wrong I was.

I haven't used the Loobman, but it's an affordable solution if you are good with remembering to give it a squeeze. I like that I don't need to think about it more than when I add the oil. I recently added a 'Lube Tube' to expand the system capacity even more. By my calculation, I should be able to go about 2000-2500 miles between refills. FWIW, I have the older/cheaper V System, not the electronic unit. If you spend a lot of time idling or crawling in traffic, the e-system might be the ticket.
I generally am good about cleaning the chain so maybe the loobman may work. I think that probably means I may invest the money in a centerstand to make chain cleaning easier, esp on the move. The Scottoilers are really expensive- and one of the main reasons I like the shaft drive systems- heavy as they may be.


wow, that sux... did you ride in the winter out of necessity or fun?

I would be more worried about what you can't see.. the FZ-09 frame has lots of little crevices all over where this stuff could be festering un-noticed. If it was my bike I would tear it down to the frame go over each part then re-assemble. Sure its a bit of a restoration project, but before you do that you have to ask yourself how long you plan on owning the bike?

Best of luck with the repairs, i'm curious how much this project is going to set you back.
I am not sure how long I plan to own the bike as near future plans are pretty fluid. But for now, I am keeping the bike long enough! This weekend, will be taking apart as much as I can, and cleaning up whatever I can. I will try to do it as cheap as possible. Last year had the same issue of corrosion on the points but was able to control it. The sudden onslaught of winter and excessive use of salt this time by the city of New York took me by surprise. Been good about washing the bike pretty regularly so I dont expect much harm to open flat surfaces. Points and crevices around bolts will need a thorough inspection.
 

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I can't help but think that an automatic oiling system makes the back end of the bike a complete mess... Am I wrong?
They can be a bit of a mess. Several things to consider:

1. Oil weight. You can run whatever oil you like, but I prefer the Scott stuff. It works well and cleans up easily. They make a 3 season oil (blue) and a warm weather oil (red). Some guys run the red longer to minimize the mess.
2. Drip rate is adjustable. 1 drip per minute is recommended.
3. Chain guard plays a large role.
4. How fast you run. The faster you go and the more you ride, the more you fling.
 
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