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Discussion Starter #1
The chain was really quite tight on the bike when I got it, someone else commented on that at work also. There was no free play in the links with it on the side stand and the most I could push it was about the specified amount .2" - .5", but that just feels wrong to me. It felt more like an alternator belt for tightness.

The manual says not to allow over 1" of slack or it will damage the frame. I don't really get that either.

So I backed it off a couple of flats on the adjusters so it has at least a little play when on the sidestand and then today I had my son sit on the bike and checked it in that condition - tight again - backed it of another flat on the adjusters.

Is there a consensus yet on how tight this chain should be? I really don't want to mess up the final drive bearing or wheel bearing.
 

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I don't have my 09 yet, but I'd rather error on the side of loose instead of tight. If too loose and it is rubbing the frame etc you will see it. Too tight and besides increased chain/sprocket wear it can cause wheel or transmission bearing failure. And keep the swing from moving freely.

The chain is at it's tightest when the sprocket and swing arm pivot centers are in a line, have a buddy sit on the bike with enough weight to line them up, the chain should still turn easily.



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Discussion Starter #3
I'm with you on the alignment thing and the chain being tightest at that point.
On my bonneville and bandit, I put the bike on the centerstand, disconnected the shocks and put 2x4's and other wood scraps under the tire until all axis were aligned - adjusted the chain at that point, so the slack was just gone - re-assembled and made a note of how much slack that was in the normal condition. Then just made all further adjustments to that dimension.

Of course with the FZ, I'm stuck at step 1.
No centerstand and can't disconnect the shock on a paddock stand.
Hence the post
 

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Maybe a ratchet tie down strap between the swing arm and the rear sub frame. Just an idea, not sure how practical it is to get a spot on the sub frame exposed etc.

Some owners will be replacing the shock etc, they can check/measure, but that isn't the same as doing your own.

Maybe set the play at .6 or .7 inch and check it often, looking for rubbing too.



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Is there not a rubber slider that protects the frame when the chain is too loose? (My Hawk GT has one, very handy bit of protection to have.)
 

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Manual calls for .2-.59" I would go for the high end of that.That is the tighest chain slack tolerance that I can remember seeing.
 

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The chain was really quite tight on the bike when I got it, someone else commented on that at work also. There was no free play in the links with it on the side stand and the most I could push it was about the specified amount .2" - .5", but that just feels wrong to me. It felt more like an alternator belt for tightness.

The manual says not to allow over 1" of slack or it will damage the frame. I don't really get that either.

So I backed it off a couple of flats on the adjusters so it has at least a little play when on the sidestand and then today I had my son sit on the bike and checked it in that condition - tight again - backed it of another flat on the adjusters.

Is there a consensus yet on how tight this chain should be? I really don't want to mess up the final drive bearing or wheel bearing.

Here you go:
View attachment 592
 

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My owners manual says something different.It says to place the motorcycle on the sidestand and the tip says nothing of
A stand and the wheel of the ground,it just says no weight on bike.Owners manual page 7-24. Hmmm?
 

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Chain tension varies as the swing arm moves through it's arc. So you need to adjust the chain with the suspension at the same extension each time for consistent results. On the side stand takes some weight off the rear, and not everyone has a rear stand. So Yamaha is saying on the side stand the play should be that much.



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The picture was from the Service Manual, not the Owner's Manual. The Owner's Manual is more for the average Joe, Service Manual assumes that you have mechanical experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
A bit suspect then - I'm all for doing the standard type adjustment, when i can figure out how to build a centerstand.

There is a plastic swing arm protector, but I will need to look at it a bit more carefully as I didn't notice a central rib for the rollers to run on.
 

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A bit suspect then - I'm all for doing the standard type adjustment, when i can figure out how to build a centerstand.

There is a plastic swing arm protector, but I will need to look at it a bit more carefully as I didn't notice a central rib for the rollers to run on.
What would be the benefit of a center stand ? Would there be any jack point for you to rest the bike on? I only see the cat and the exhaust under the bike. I can't image you would want to rest the bike entire weigh on those pipes.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
The swing arm protector does have the ridge on both sides - so that works and should preclude any damage to the frame from a slack chain or the chain plates wearing thru the protector. I did take another couple of flats of adjustment out today for a total of five flats. Finally the chain slack seems reasonable.

I've been looking around the footrest area for places to put a centerstand - not really an "on the bike" stand, but one I can put under the bike in the garage - and there really isn't anywhere easy to do it. I'm circling in on somewhere around the footpegs, but it isn't going to be easy. If I was Yamaha doing it, I'd use the frame spacers right behind the footrests, but then there is the problem of the pipe exit location, so I'm not surprised they didn't put one on. Doubt they can put one on.

So today, I got the hacksaw out and adjusted the cheapie cycle gear rear paddock stand so that it would lift the spoolies properly, instead of lifting them at the ends. I then tried the method suggested by the experts at paddock stand use here and was able to lift it by myself. It was not easy though. I'll make up a couple of pics to show what I had to do with the stand.

What would be the benefit of a centerstand? The biggest is that it goes with the bike and is easy to use, once you learn the trick to using one.
What can you do on a centerstand that you can't do on a paddock stand? Take the shock out and exchange it for a better one. With a jack under the engine, or pipes, you can raise the front end and do everything - down to steering head bearing removal. I can't imagine a front paddock stand allowing that to happen.

There is the bike lift, but you will be lifting on the pipes. Then there are the sidepost bike lifters that fit a bolt down a hole in the swingarm bolt - but as I noticed today, this bike doesn't have a hole in the swingarm bolt - at least on the left side it doesn't.

Perhaps I should stop fretting and build a "stout wooden box" as they say in the owners manual.
 

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My first couple of street bikes in the mid to late 70s had center stands, I liked them then but don't miss them now lol.

For changing the front tire I like a rear stand + a front stand, if it is a front stand that uses a pin in the bottom of the triple clamps you can take the forks off too.

For stuff like the rear shock I like to lift from above. Something like an eye bolt in the garage ceiling, a hand wench, straps, etc. If you have that arrangement you can skip getting a front stand for changing the front tire.



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All I will say is check your chain often... 1300 miles now and the chain is at 30mm or so. Never expect to change so quickly... not 75 HP anymore (FZ6R)
 

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Is it me or the chain is very noisy? Thinking out if the box... my chain was within specs when I bought the bike. 1400 miles later its double the play it should have. Now that I put it baxk to specs I can hear it on the freeway, even with the exhaust! I'm kind of tempted of loosen the chain up a bit to 20mm and see what happen. Not normal I think for a chain to stretch so much so fast... what do you guys think, any issues with yours?

I will give a dealer a call tomorrow to have their opinion too.

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My educated guess is that the chain was at 30mm for a reason. So I will readjust it to 20 - 25mm and see how it goes. If the noise is gone and the chain look like it goes to 30mm again and stay there... that's the number I will use. I rather change sprockets & chain if Im wrong then rebuilding the output shaft bearing because the chain was too tight. I will keep a very close eye on it for a while... I think everyone should to. Who knows how they came up with so tight free play numbers? (5-15mm) Not normal that my chain stretch 15mm in 1400 miles. At that pace I will need to change chain before my tires! LOL

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