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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I rode to DC from NYC. Have faced 35/40mph gusts before but today seemed worse. At one point, on an open bridge, cars slowed down because I believe they were getting blown around too. And slowing down made me feel like I was surely going to get blown away-could barely move till I got up to speed!
I tried many of the techniques in this https://rideapart.com/articles/how-to-ride-a-motorcycle-in-a-heavy-crosswindarticle (including comments)even before reading it with varying degrees of success-the flappering knee actually seemed to work best! I will try tomorrow and see if it is consistent.

Any techniques that you guys follow?
 

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Very carefully. :) I have ridden quite a bit on the eastern shoreline of Lake Erie which is one of the windiest parts of the country. Some say to ride near trucks to block the wind however from my experiences I strongly disagree. The worst is having the wind blocked only to have it hit you at an inopportune time. The absolute worst is traveling between two trucks around a bend and then having the wind shoot through the middle of them so avoid that like the plague. The best method I have in strong winds is to use my leg as a sail. You want to use the leg sail to counter the wind's forces of pushing you into oncoming traffic. I.e if the wind is blowing you to the left point your right knee outward to cup the wind and pull you back to the right, something like how a sailboat tacks into the wind. Try to put yourself into a position that if you are blown around that you won't be blown into another vehicle or immoveable object. That usually means staying away from the centerline of the road and giving yourself some space from the traffic moving in your direction. Slow your speed down a bit if safe to do so. It may feel more stable to go faster when it hits head on but if it shifts to the side it will really move you. Do you have a windscreen? A better windscreen may help some too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Yeah that's the technique that worked best for me too. Have to practice it more though. Stopping in the middle of this is the worst... Those darn cagers on the bridge nearly had me killed because of that! Had to keep my legs low till I got enough speed... And riding next to a truck on that abbe bridge,I felt the wind gushing in from under the truck, with just as much force!
 

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I just ride. It's like flying an airplane.
 
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As inane as it sounds, thinking very consciously about counter-steer while riding in wind was a game-changer for me. There's a stretch coming into Boston that is typically pretty gusty on a bike, and as soon as I started thinking more deliberately about using counter-steer in that area, I started finding that stretch dramatically more enjoyable.

Disclaimer, our ideas of "gusty" may differ :)
 

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If it's really bad and the highway is packed with traffic, that's when I head for Plan B. Hit the secondary or back roads to get where I am going, away from traffic and semi truck traffic.

Also I tuck in to reduce the human sail factor. When it is gusty, I also stick more to the centre of the lane. That way when a gust of wind hits you or the gusting wind stops for a second, you have more room on both sides if it does toss you around. I have had it where the wind stops blowing for a second makes you move more than a sudden gust of wind. Be cautious of approaching tree lines, under passes or even big buildings or structures beside the road. They can cause all kinds of weird wind direction changes.

I find the 09 is more forgiving in the wind from it's low centre of gravity, the DR650SE is another story, high centre of gravity in comparison and a wild ride on a windy day, lol.
 
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Tuck under the windscreen and stick a knee out into the oncoming wind.

If it's really bad, I'll get off the highway and take the frontage roads.
 

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Get down on the tank to reduce your cross sectional area. Counter steer, keep your eyes focused ahead where you want to go and enjoy the ride.
 

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I find the 09 is more forgiving in the wind from it's low centre of gravity, the DR650SE is another story, high centre of gravity in comparison and a wild ride on a windy day, lol.
While riding my DR on a six lane highway I had the wind push me all the way across my lane and onto the shoulder. I was shaking for awhile after that incident.
 

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I open an umbrella while riding and use it as a sail... same concept as Cecil described.
 

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I find the 09 is more forgiving in the wind from it's low centre of gravity, the DR650SE is another story, high centre of gravity in comparison and a wild ride on a windy day, lol.
A 2002 DR650SE is the bike I was riding when I had my house on Lake Erie and figured out the leg sail :) It is also the bike I was on when I had to lock my arms, tuck, and ease out from in between two trucks when the wind came through like a windtunnel. I so loved that bike, except that at 90+mph she would vibe out and my gas mileage would drop to under 30mpg. I put 30k miles on that bike and it never had an issue, and I crossed the country coast to coast on her in under 3 days. If she was a v-twin I would have kept her until the end of time...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ok, some of you are real jokers here.
Was all prepared for crosswinds on Sunday but all I found was rubber-necking cagers creating long traffic jams!


While riding my DR on a six lane highway I had the wind push me all the way across my lane and onto the shoulder. I was shaking for awhile after that incident.
Holy S****, that's scary as hell and I was thinking that would happen to me on Saturday!

A 2002 DR650SE is the bike I was riding when I had my house on Lake Erie and figured out the leg sail :) It is also the bike I was on when I had to lock my arms, tuck, and ease out from in between two trucks when the wind came through like a windtunnel. I so loved that bike, except that at 90+mph she would vibe out and my gas mileage would drop to under 30mpg. I put 30k miles on that bike and it never had an issue, and I crossed the country coast to coast on her in under 3 days. If she was a v-twin I would have kept her until the end of time...
The DR is considered very good- esp for solo touring. Read Jay's story on ADV going through 30 countries on his used DR650. Amazing stuff. I think for two-up, the KLR is king though.

If it's really bad and the highway is packed with traffic, that's when I head for Plan B. Hit the secondary or back roads to get where I am going, away from traffic and semi truck traffic.

Also I tuck in to reduce the human sail factor. When it is gusty, I also stick more to the centre of the lane. That way when a gust of wind hits you or the gusting wind stops for a second, you have more room on both sides if it does toss you around. I have had it where the wind stops blowing for a second makes you move more than a sudden gust of wind. Be cautious of approaching tree lines, under passes or even big buildings or structures beside the road. They can cause all kinds of weird wind direction changes.

I find the 09 is more forgiving in the wind from it's low centre of gravity, the DR650SE is another story, high centre of gravity in comparison and a wild ride on a windy day, lol.
True, the FZ is pretty good. I was reading that even the mighty GS gets fazed under crosswinds! I can only imagine what a DR or any tall skinny bike would be going through.
And it was the open areas between parts that had trees on either sides that were the worst. The knee pointing to the wind is the one solution that works very well- I am not sure if a windcsreen would help at all from winds hitting the bike from the side.
 

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It is funny but I have actually been looking into this concept lately. Some supermoto riders wear boots with sliders that mount on the bottom under your toes!
I have a brand new pair of Gaerne or how ever the heck you spell it still in the box. If you have small feet I'll make you a heck of a deal.
 

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Tuck and slide my butt back as far as I can. In my experience with my other bikes that had fairings, this would increase my down-force on the bike and I could continue riding at speed.
 
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