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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I find the FZ09 to be some sort of super hybrid supermoto/streetbike thing. It's awesome in almost all handling respects, but I'm still trying to figure out how it likes to lean. Part of me wants to always throw a knee out and drop into the inside like I'm on a crotch rocket. And part of me comes off the seat, using my upper-torso to control lateral balance exiting turns.

Haven't tried backing it in hard yet and the concept is the same, but I wanted to hear others feedback. Please share so I can test out some of your tips tomorrow on CA-33.
 

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To initiate lean angle....the rider must first countersteer. If you are not familiar with the term....do some research on the net. When you understand countersteer..then you can practice it on the road.
 

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My way is probably not proper but my main concern is not going down - especially with Cecil. I mostly stay centered on the seat, but lean my upper body and stick my leg and foot out through the turn. This allows me to compensate for uneven road surfaces and unexpected hazards quickly. When you move over on the seat it takes much longer to react to the unexpected. If the tire lets go my foot is already out and I can attempt a push off save. You do not have much time when leaned into a turn and the front tire hits a rock and slides out. We had that happen about a month ago on the Dorsoduro at about 40mph leaned over pretty good around a sharp turn. Within 2/10ths of a second from when the tire began to slide my leg and foot already pushed us back up (in 2/10ths of a second the front tire had already slid about 8'). The tire finally grabbed after the bike lifted up and then we leaned back over again and exited the turn near the outside of the lane. I mildly sprained my ankle, but it was completely healed in 3 days. Our friend was behind us and filmed it all with his gopro.

This way isn't going to win many races though, the more weight you shift the faster you can take a turn. But if something unexpected happens you may need to reverse that weight shift in a big hurry to save your life. There is a big difference from track riding and street riding.
 

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Just my opinion but before pushing this bike hard enough to need to ask this question step 1 would be ditch the pos Dunlop tires it came with, step 2 would be straighten out the suspension, step 3 would be flash the ecu so a mode isn't a bucking bronco. I've been treating mine like a muscle bagger so far, might change once I have tires that I trust.
 

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Don't know if it's proper, but I tend to only roll off the seat slightly and lean forward, knee out, lining my shoulder up with the (stock) mirror. I find this moves my weight forward enough to get decent feedback from the front end. It feels very natural for me, but YMMV.
 

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1. Counter-steering is a must or the bike won't lean no matter what you are doing with your body on the bike. (Plenty of video on youtube - Search CA Superbike Schools)
2. You can sit on the seat or slide over and hang a cheek off the seat. Hanging off will keep the bike more vertical. If you take the same turn at the same speed...you can have the bike lean less if you hang off. This will give you more traction because your tire is in a better contact patch.
3. Lean forward and get your helmet in the mirror and "kiss the mirror" if you want more traction (more speed is attainable in this position too)
4. Stay smooth and don't upset the bike with body movement.
5. Smooth on the throttle = faster through the turn.

That's all I got. YMMV
 

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Don't think, just do. +1 for CD and River Get the suspension set up for you, it might require new springs and a new shock on the rear the older ZX-10 and ZX6R shocks work if you are budget conscious, get that ECU flashed if you haven't already but if you have a newer model it should already be done. From what I've read Yamaha's fix is pretty good relative to what it was for the first year. Lastly definitely make sure you have a good set of shoes, I've been using the PR4's and I haven't had any issues but I'm not a track guy, nor am I an expert just an average enthusiast. If you know how to counter steer and go around corners in a bike then you shouldn't have to think about it just go around the corner.
 

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Don't think, just do. +1 for CD and River Get the suspension set up for you, it might require new springs and a new shock on the rear the older ZX-10 and ZX6R shocks work if you are budget conscious, get that ECU flashed if you haven't already but if you have a newer model it should already be done. From what I've read Yamaha's fix is pretty good relative to what it was for the first year. Lastly definitely make sure you have a good set of shoes, I've been using the PR4's and I haven't had any issues but I'm not a track guy, nor am I an expert just an average enthusiast. If you know how to counter steer and go around corners in a bike then you shouldn't have to think about it just go around the corner.
In addition to the above I would recommend the Aussie O2 controller to help with low speed engine surging. Also practice cornering using the look-ahead technique, it really makes a difference. Start easy and stay safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm currently running Q3s on it. It falls into turns a helluva lot quicker now. I swapped the rear shock about 2k miles back for a Ohlins ZX10 with a 610 spring (230lb rider). I've got a mechanic dropping new springs in the front with 10w Maxima fork oil for me today, and unless I shell out the dough for some cartridges, my suspension will be set. As for the ECU, I've got a 2015 model and it hasn't been too bad, most of my bikes have been literbikes with the exception of a 'Busa. Throttle finesse had to become a survival skill :D

Counter steer is how I initiate my turn, adding/reducing to pick my line. It's going to be nice once the springs are in. Should eliminate that brake dive and keep the front end from wallowing towward the outside. I guess I could've shed a few pounds to improve the suspension, but springs are cheaper and easier :cool:
 

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30 years ago when I had to go through a rider education course to legally ride at the age of 16 the instructor taught counter steering and leaning with the bike. I see that many motorcycle police are taught to sit upright and lean the bike underneath themselves much like motocross riders. I suppose that once you get the bike sorted out and you find yourself dragging your footpegs it may be time to learn how to properly drag a knee to reduce your lean angle.
 

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I lean in with my hips elbow, and shoulders (point where you want to go). My arms do little to no work. Your lower body should control the bike and your arms support you. When you use the handle bars to initiate and control a turn typically the result is less than smooth transitions and not very smooth riding in general. I still shift from side to side on my bikes to turn out of habit from racing. I'm sure it looks silly on the street to people behind me but it works and reduces fatigue. The whole knee slinging trend looks cool but isn't necessary. I rarely put my knee down racing unless I was unsure how far I was leaned, it can be a good reference at times but doesn't assist in keeping the bike any further upright than if your knee is tucked.
 

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Feelers touch easily on the FZ. I tuck in the inside foot tight to the peg so it doesn't drag. Shift my body weight to keep the bike more upright and keep better tire contact patch. The rest is keeping smooth inputs and enjoying the physics of riding a bike!

470483.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Feelers touch easily on the FZ. I tuck in the inside foot tight to the peg so it doesn't drag. Shift my body weight to keep the bike more upright and keep better tire contact patch. The rest is keeping smooth inputs and enjoying the physics of riding a bike!

View attachment 15314
Nice form Buck! Great pic!

I'm an avid fan of riding in my DC shoes as well, but after a car hooked a left in front of me on a 2 lane stretch and my shin taking the worst of it, I've switched to SDI riding boots. They definitely instill extra confidence & quite comfy.
 

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Trail brake into the turn, then you should be off the brake and neutral throttle by the apex. Knee out some, cheek off the seat, chin up looking through the turn. I prefer moving around over staying rigid on the seat. It makes the ride more fun and keeps the bike from doing all the work. I feel more confident this way.
 

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... My arms do little to no work.... When you use the handle bars to initiate and control a turn typically the result is less than smooth transitions and not very smooth riding in general.
Not sure if they still offer this, but take a look at the "NO-BS" bike. You are using you hands and handlebars more than you are admitting here.

I still shift from side to side on my bikes to turn out of habit from racing. I'm sure it looks silly on the street to people behind me but it works and reduces fatigue. The whole knee slinging trend looks cool but isn't necessary. I rarely put my knee down racing unless I was unsure how far I was leaned, it can be a good reference at times but doesn't assist in leaning the bike any farther.
Putting your knee out.. or leaning any body part off your bike at all is not intended to lean the bike farther, it allows less of a lean angle for a given speed. Take a corner leaning the bike underneath you at a fast pace, you will see the bike leaning to the edge of the tire, and you are almost at the max speed for that body configuration. Take the same corner at the same speed while leaning off the bike, extending your knee/elbow and you will see the bike is much more upright than the last pass, meaning you could take it faster now that there is more room to lean the bike over.
 

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Not sure if they still offer this, but take a look at the "NO-BS" bike. You are using you hands and handlebars more than you are admitting here.



Putting your knee out.. or leaning any body part off your bike at all is not intended to lean the bike farther, it allows less of a lean angle for a given speed. Take a corner leaning the bike underneath you at a fast pace, you will see the bike leaning to the edge of the tire, and you are almost at the max speed for that body configuration. Take the same corner at the same speed while leaning off the bike, extending your knee/elbow and you will see the bike is much more upright than the last pass, meaning you could take it faster now that there is more room to lean the bike over.
You completely did not understand my post. Leaning off the bike and reducing the angle of the motorcycle does not require you to fling your knee out.

Actually forget it. I'm not even going to continue. I know what I meant and I know how to ride. So I'm not going to continue this.
 
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